Jump to content

Powering RGBs


Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

We are switching half of our incans to RGB strips and nodes this year. So Excited!!

I believe I've done most of my homework to understand how they are powered and controlled, and not exceeding Amp and Watts limits, etc. So my question is probably stupid, but just need to make sure I have a grasp on it.

 

We will be running 72 RGB channels (24 strips & nodes). I have roughly calculated the TOTAL watts to be 1632.

That said, if I was looking at a 12V 400w power supply, I would need to purchase 5 of them to be able to accomodate the loads, correct?

And if that is correct, how do five units power only three CMB24D controllers? Would two of the CMB24Ds be run by two power suppliers?

I'm sure this is a riduculous question for some, but since I haven't yet received all the components, it's difficult to fully grasp the concept.  I'm more of a "hands on to figure it out" kind of person. :)

Thanks in advance for your helpful response(s)!

 

-Troy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All,

 

We are switching half of our incans to RGB strips and nodes this year. So Excited!!

I believe I've done most of my homework to understand how they are powered and controlled, and not exceeding Amp and Watts limits, etc. So my question is probably stupid, but just need to make sure I have a grasp on it.

 

We will be running 72 RGB channels (24 strips & nodes). I have roughly calculated the TOTAL watts to be 1632.

That said, if I was looking at a 12V 400w power supply, I would need to purchase 5 of them to be able to accomodate the loads, correct?

And if that is correct, how do five units power only three CMB24D controllers? Would two of the CMB24Ds be run by two power suppliers?

I'm sure this is a riduculous question for some, but since I haven't yet received all the components, it's difficult to fully grasp the concept.  I'm more of a "hands on to figure it out" kind of person. :)

Thanks in advance for your helpful response(s)!

 

-Troy

How did you come up with that count and load?  24 strips of what, 5m lengths?  How many nodes, or is that part of the 24?   I ask because that seems a bit high to me.  

If that works out to be the correct wattage, then we can go forward, but I am thinking some how you are way over.. Just a thought

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plasma,

Yeah, I'm HOPING that I am WAY over.  Here's what I'm looking at from Ray Wu:

23 of  http://www.aliexpress.com/item/-/1932713082.html

15 of  http://www.aliexpress.com/item/5MLED-strip-5050-SMD-12V-flexible-light-60LED-m-300LEDs-White-White-warm-Blue-Green-Red/1745388908.html

My "calculations" happened by adding up, and mutliplying all these together to arrive at the wattage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may want to get the pixels from ray and measure the power output.  or Ask ray to verify the power consumption in Full white.

 

According to ray, the use 0.28 watts each

 

but holiday coro has similar RGB nodes while a single color draws 0.28 watts... full white draws more like 0.68 watts

 

 

You can probably still use the 5 power supplies... just be carefull to not push full white.

\

Edited by Crazydave
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is more to it than total amperage.   How long are the lines going to the strings/strips,  how many nodes in a continuous piece,  where is the controller in relation to the strips/strings.  How many controllers (do the controllers have separate power inputs for output sections  etc.

 

i.e a 16 output controller with 2 powered halves may power 16 strings up to 50 nodes with all power cumming from the controller (if each sting is connected to the controller.   The same situation with 8 double (50 node) strings may NOT be enough power when used off 8 of the outputs (need power injection)   etc. etc.

 

Point is total draw and total available power is usually NOT enough information for a proper setup.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plasma,

Yeah, I'm HOPING that I am WAY over.  Here's what I'm looking at from Ray Wu:

23 of  http://www.aliexpress.com/item/-/1932713082.html

15 of  http://www.aliexpress.com/item/5MLED-strip-5050-SMD-12V-flexible-light-60LED-m-300LEDs-White-White-warm-Blue-Green-Red/1745388908.html

My "calculations" happened by adding up, and mutliplying all these together to arrive at the wattage.

Did you already buy these?  Do you have any idea how bright that is going to be???  Did you want it to be really bright... cause it is going to be.  hee hee.

 

you are at about 1660 watts or 138 or so amps at 12vdc for just the strips.  Those strips are about 72 watts each theoretically.    .06Amps per set of 3 LEDs in series.  Not including losses..

 

That does not include the nodes.

 

Ya know.. if you haven't ordered yet, you may find it more economical and easier to deal with if you would get WS2812 strips.. even if you make them dump strips in software you can still inject power directly into the strips where needed.  You won't need any high power controllers for RGB and you won't have all the heat to deal with at a single point.  Just a thought! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Put the calculator down, this is simple.

 

You have 3 CMB24D controllers.  Each of those has 2 power inputs.  

 

Connect a separate power supply to each input and be done with it. If you were to use a 400 watt power supply on each input, you'd have plenty of power and you'd keep those power supplies happy and not warm them up too much.

 

When sequencing, ask yourself if you really need 100% white.   Test out those strips and you'll see that 80% white looks just as spectacular as 100% white. Use a kill-a-watt meter to see  how much power you save by going to 80% brightness instead of 100%.

 

Good luck!

Steve

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It may make the wiring a little messy, but it's possible to split the strips among the power supplies however you want. Here's how:

  1. Tie the negative (-) terminals of all the power supplies together.
  2. Tie the (-) terminals of all the controllers together, and connect them to the (-) terminals of the power supplies.
  3. Connect the positive (+) terminal from each controller to a power supply, or use a separate low-wattage power supply to power the electronics of the controllers separately.
  4. Connect the RGB leads from the strips to their channels, but don't connect the common anode (+) lead.
  5. Connect the (+) lead from the strips to the (+) terminals on the power supplies. Evenly distribute the strips among the power supplies.

That's an option, but I like flyinverted's method better because it's much neater.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Don locked this topic
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...