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No red light flashing on unit 1


caniac
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caniac wrote:

it is plugged in and it has a live circuit.  what do i need to check?


how do you know the circuit is live?

did you measure the voltage at the outlet?

then see if you have the same voltage on each side of the fuses in the case.
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JBullard wrote:

caniac wrote:
it is plugged in and it has a live circuit. what do i need to check?


how do you know the circuit is live?

did you measure the voltage at the outlet?

then see if you have the same voltage on each side of the fuses in the case.
extension cord and plugged a light into each outlet going to the controller. this is a dedicated circuit and the other controller on it works fine.
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caniac wrote:

JBullard wrote:
caniac wrote:
it is plugged in and it has a live circuit.  what do i need to check?


how do you know the circuit is live?

did you measure the voltage at the outlet?

then see if you have the same voltage on each side of the fuses in the case.
extension cord and plugged a light into each outlet going to the controller.  this is a dedicated circuit and the other controller on it works fine.


Then get out the multimeter and start checking voltage to each side of the fuses. If the voltage is different, them pull the fuse and make a continuity check. If bad, replace the fuse
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JBullard wrote:

caniac wrote:
JBullard wrote:
caniac wrote:
it is plugged in and it has a live circuit. what do i need to check?


how do you know the circuit is live?

did you measure the voltage at the outlet?

then see if you have the same voltage on each side of the fuses in the case.
extension cord and plugged a light into each outlet going to the controller. this is a dedicated circuit and the other controller on it works fine.


Then get out the multimeter and start checking voltage to each side of the fuses. If the voltage is different, them pull the fuse and make a continuity check. If bad, replace the fuse
that only works if you have one of those and know how to use it. I fail on both parts of that quiz. Is it a standard fuse?

this unit worked and worked fine halloween. I did leave my controllers in the yard given that I was going to be setting up Christmas early. was that a bad thing?
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caniac wrote:

that only works if you have one of those and know how to use it.   I fail on both parts of that quiz.  Is it a standard fuse?

this unit worked and worked fine halloween.  I did leave my controllers in the yard given that I was going to be setting up Christmas early.  was that a bad thing?

-------------------------------------------------------
Ok, when you asked what you needed to check.......

If you do not have an inventory of replacement fuses from LOR, then the 15 amp fuses for microwave ovens will work.

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The fuses should be fast acting 15 amp ceramic fuses.

The link for the LOR fuses is below. I just ordered a pack several years ago when I ordered some controllers, luckily haven't needed to use them, but I have them in inventory for that night when a fuse may blow.

http://store.lightorama.com/12pafu15afaa.html

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JBullard wrote:

The fuses should be fast acting 15 amp ceramic fuses.

The link for the LOR fuses is below. I just ordered a pack several years ago when I ordered some controllers, luckily haven't needed to use them, but I have them in inventory for that night when a fuse may blow.

http://store.lightorama.com/12pafu15afaa.html
so do you think one fuse blew or both? is it common for the controller to not work at all when one fuse blows?
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JBullard wrote:

If you have the CTB16PC controller, the power for the board electronics is supplied on the right side.

So perhaps if the problem is the fuse, that would be the one to check first.
that is what I have. my confusion is this, it worked fine two weeks ago for my Halloween show so what would cause the fuse to blow.
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We don't know for certain that the problem is a blown fuse until a continuity test is made on the fuse or it is replaced and then the controller starts working.

I have been using LOR since 2007, have 30 controllers, and never had a bad fuse (so far :))

But if the LED light doesn't even flash, then it suggests a power issue, either a line cord, fuse, or fried onboard electronics.

Wouldn't have a clue without using a multimeter to test the unit.

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JBullard wrote:

We don't know for certain that the problem is a blown fuse until a continuity test is made on the fuse or it is replaced and then the controller starts working.

I have been using LOR since 2007, have 30 controllers, and never had a bad fuse (so far :))

But if the LED light doesn't even flash, then it suggests a power issue, either a line cord, fuse, or fried onboard electronics.

Wouldn't have a clue without using a multimeter to test the unit.
a quick look at the circuit board doesn't show any sign of stress (have seen a few fried PC's). fuse sounds easy enough to try but how do i trace a line cord issue. if it is a fried controller then what kind of warranty is on these and how quick is the warranty turn around?
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JBullard wrote:

How many amps were you pulling on each bank of the controller?
nothing is plugged in yet so that would be zero, will be running LED's and a rope light signing Christmas tree plus a few LED based mini trees.
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caniac wrote:

Wouldn't have a clue without using a multimeter to test the unit.a quick look at the circuit board doesn't show any sign of stress (have seen a few fried PC's). fuse sounds easy enough to try but how do i trace a line cord issue. if it is a fried controller then what kind of warranty is on these and how quick is the warranty turn around?


Tracing a line cord issue is easily done with a multimeter.

Is this one of the units you bought from WOW lights? Do they offer the standard LOR warranty or something else?

I think I read in another post, either yesterday or today that LORs repair center is backed up 3 or 4 weeks, which is normal this time of year.
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JBullard wrote:

caniac wrote:
Wouldn't have a clue without using a multimeter to test the unit.a quick look at the circuit board doesn't show any sign of stress (have seen a few fried PC's). fuse sounds easy enough to try but how do i trace a line cord issue. if it is a fried controller then what kind of warranty is on these and how quick is the warranty turn around?


Tracing a line cord issue is easily done with a multimeter.

Is this one of the units you bought from WOW lights? Do they offer the standard LOR warranty or something else?

I think I read in another post, either yesterday or today that LORs repair center is backed up 3 or 4 weeks, which is normal this time of year.




I bought this at WoWLights. Another Option worst case I guess is to buy another controller while this is being repaired (if it needs that) assuming there is no backorder on new.
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Max-Paul wrote:

I highly suggest you get a VOM and learn how to use it. You are past the Mr. Christmas stage and a VOM is your friend.


I highly suggest this comment, worded the way it is, was not appropriate.

I do agree that this hobby can be enhanced by having a basic knowledge of electricty (both for safety and trouble shooting), and some inexpensive basic electrical test equipment also helps.
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JBullard wrote:

Max-Paul wrote:
I highly suggest you get a VOM and learn how to use it. You are past the Mr. Christmas stage and a VOM is your friend.


I highly suggest this comment, worded the way it is, was not appropriate.

I do agree that this hobby can be enhanced by having a basic knowledge of electricity (both for safety and trouble shooting), and some inexpensive basic electrical test equipment also helps.

I understand the benefits but it really isn't my forte, I am a programmer by trade and that is where I tend to focus my "talents". If it becomes a necessity then I will most likely hire an electrician. Our home is a 70's era house (with all the joy that comes with that) and come spring I have contracted with an electrician to replace my power panel so that I can have 2-3 times the dedicated GFCI circuits for my display.
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JBullard wrote:

My house is 50's era, and since I use LEDs, can run the whole display from only a couple 15 amp outlets.

In my case, switching to LEDs was cheaper then adding additional electrical capacity.

Without going into any real detail we have discovered all sorts of weird things over the past few years plus the existing power panel opens into the laundry nook (had to modify the cover so our front loaders would fit while allowing access to the breakers). Flipping it around to the other wall will give us room for four more dedicated breakers plus clean up a few wiring issues.
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Guest Don Gillespie

Once you check the fuse you want to check to see what kind of amps you are drawing on each channel, a killo-watt meter is great for this, last year or the year before I can't remember, I was blowing fuses all the time on the contoller, I finally went and purchased a killo- watt meter I found that my old incadesent lights were the problem I took them out of the display replaced them with LEDS and the problem was fixed.

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