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The line from the main box is #6 Romex and only about 50 feet long. Each outlet has been "snipped" to allow for two circuits on one outlet. The wire from the breakers to the outlets is #12.

I just finished making 22 mini tree's from 2 tomato cages each. Uuuugghh.. I think that I shall have nightmares of Tomato cages and Zip ties chasing me for several weeks to come. lol..

Thanks in advance.


Attached files 73636=4541-DSC02436.jpg

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I don't think that twisting the grounds together is up to code. Here is what you should use instead. You can get them at home depot or lowes or any electrical supply shop.



Edit: I just noticed your wire sizes. I would check to make sure your wire size is adequate. This link should help. http://www.planetchristmas.com/WireSize.htm

I don't want to bash your work but I wouldn't want you to have a fire.


Attached files 73646=4548-pACE2-976322dt.jpg

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The main box looks good from what I can tell (can't tell wire sizes, etc). 20A breakers need #12 wire (or larger), 15A need #14 (or larger).

That "rubbermaid container" definitely wouldn't pass an inspection, though. Technically you should run the conduit down to your outlet boxes (you'd have to use a different style). What is the purpose of the rubbermaid container? I doubt it's waterproof in that configuration, and it doesn't look like you're outside anyway...

EDIT: Ok I looked again, and maybe you are outside? In that case, you should replace the outlet boxes with proper outdoor rated ones, then use "in-use" covers on each of them. Then you can scrap the rubbermaid box, which I doubt is weatherproof in that configuration on its side anyway...

In use cover:

6198923.JPG
-Tim

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Don't plan on pulling a full load on #6 as it is very under rated for that load. What size is your breaker that feeds this panel? Tie your grounds in with your neutral bar and consider another ground rod. As mentioned, local code in my area specifies the nice little boxes with the clear covers that will close while plugged in.

Other than that, it looks like a good clean job. I do not see an issue with using Ceel-Tite, It has a better rating than your box (I assume the box is rated 3X?)

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Eric R wrote:

Tie your grounds in with your neutral bar

No don't do that. It's a code violation to tie grounds and neutrals together anywhere but your main service panel. In any subpanel, they must be kept separate. As mentioned above, you should use a separate grounding bus. Not sure code will like them all just twisted together, although I personally can't imagine that being an actual hazard as long as they have a good connection together.

-Tim
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tfischer wrote:

Eric R wrote:
Tie your grounds in with your neutral bar

No don't do that. It's a code violation to tie grounds and neutrals together anywhere but your main service panel. In any subpanel, they must be kept separate. As mentioned above, you should use a separate grounding bus. Not sure code will like them all just twisted together, although I personally can't imagine that being an actual hazard as long as they have a good connection together.

-Tim

My bad, you are correct Tim. I looked at the code.
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Did you apply for a permit from your local city hall? They are usually very helpful and can tell you exactly what is required, and will do an inspection to make sure everything is up to code. This is a must.

I'm not a licensed electrician but I've got a lot of experience and I see several problems. Is that a 100amp rated subpanel attached to a 2 pole 100amp breaker? If either is a no you've got a problem.

Second, according to my NEC chart, the feeder hot wires should be #2 copper- not #6! There needs to be a grounding wire that runs from your main panel to the subpanel and connects to a grounding bar. The conduit looks too small to handle the larger size wires.

Third, as mentioned, the rubbermaid container isn't Kosher. Each 12 Ga wire needs to be in conduit connecting to (10) individual waterproof outlet boxes (one for each circuit), with appropriate covers. I would install 20amp GFCI duplex outlets in each box.

Fourth, the grounding wires have been cut too short, and each needs to attach to grounding bar.

PLEASE talk with your local building inspector and/or a licensed electrician to get specifics on what is required for your area. It will save a lot of problems and worries in the future. :}

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So what does the code say about rubbermaid containers? document.write('tongue.gif');tongue.gif Other than that, I think you're good. I would replace those boxes with ones having conduit knockouts, and you'd be OK.

As far as the ground wires go, it isn't pretty, but I don't believe the code requires a grounding bar (although I'd use one). You do need to do two things if you don't use a ground bar. You need to put some sort of connector on that. You can't have them just twisted together. Either a big wirenut (if they make one that big), a crimp sleeve, or possibly a split bolt would work (although technically, split bolts aren't rated for that many wires). Second, you need to have the box bonded to ground. I don't see a ground wire going to the box itself? If you installed a ground bar, the box gets grounded automatically since the bar is bolted to the box.

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One more thing - those aren't the correct fittings for that sealtite. Those are PVC fittings. For the sealtite, you need a compression fitting specifically designed for that conduit. I wouldn't consider that a safety hazard, but it doesn't meet code either.

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Install a ground bar, if wire are to short, it ok to splice in the panel, this will also ground the panel.

Do not install the bonding screw that comes with all panel, this is used for when the panel is installed for your main service, you panel is a sub panel.

Install no larger then a 60 AMP 2-pole breaker feeding your sup panel, # 6 wire is only rated for 60 AMP.

Use weather proof box's and covers out side, with GFCI receptacle.

Use correct fittings with seal tight flex or PVC pipe.

Over all I think you did a great job.

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Yes, was told not to tie in ground with neutral at all. Keeping them separate. As for the ground, they are wired in pretty tight.

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Yes, it's a 100A panel but as you see I am only using it for 40 amp. It will never get over 40 and that's what the #6 is rated for. Actually 50 so I am under there. As for the rubbermaid, somebody else had done this on their setup last year and suggested it and his pictures got a lot of raves. It's all temporary.

Everything else was talked about here and at Home Depot and was ok then. Snipping the outlets into separate circuits too.

Thanks

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As for the ground, they are wired in pretty tight.

You need to use the ground bar or a split bolt to tie all the ground together, even if they are wired tight, per NEC. The ground bar is the best, remember you dealing with electricity, if you do not give it the path it need to go to ground it will find it own path to ground, and it could be YOU.

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I would highly recommmend a GFI somewhere... Either on your main panel, or each of the outlets. (Outlets are better to help narrow down problems.)..

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Question. Not that it's not important, but if a grounding bar is as important as everyone is saying, why do they not install one in the box??

Just wondering. Thanks

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llbarnes wrote:

Question. Not that it's not important, but if a grounding bar is as important as everyone is saying, why do they not install one in the box??

Just wondering. Thanks

An electrician told me once that the bar is entirely optional because of the different configurations of the box itself. According to him, you can change the size of the bar (number of contacts) for the application, and in some areas, what was done above (twisting the wires together into a big knot) is acceptable for a sub-panel. Keeping in mind, one of those wires (#4 or #6 for 100 amp box) needs to go to the main and connect there.
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llbarnes wrote:

Question. Not that it's not important, but if a grounding bar is as important as everyone is saying, why do they not install one in the box??

Not sure. But they have provisions for it, and they sell them alongside the boxes for < $5...

My guess is that if you had a very small building, such as a cabin, this sort of box could be a main service panel, and in that case you wouldn't need the separate grounding bus. But in actuality, it's probably just a way to keep costs looking lower.

-Tim
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Thanks guys. It's just odd that #1, it doesn't come with the grounding bar, and #2 that I have to drill holes to accomadate for a grounding bar.

I'll be getting one of those wire clamps regardless.

Thanks

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llbarnes wrote:

#2 that I have to drill holes to accomadate for a grounding bar.


Really? The subpanels I've put in have had a place where they go, with predrilled holes and a little raised indentions so the screw doesn't go further than the back panel...

-Tim
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