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Using two outlets as as outdoor/indoor interconnect?


taybrynn
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Maybe this is crazy, maybe this is aginst code -- I don't know. I'd like your opinions.

I've been thinking that it might be useful to have an indoor outlet installed and an outdoor outlet installed directly across from each other ... and simply interconnected with 12 gauge electrical wire. In other words, no power connected to them ... they would act as a pass trough and could be insulated and water-proofed as needed.

You could hook up an extension cord from the outside and feed indoors or hook up to in indoor outlet and feed it outdoors via a couple extension cords. I would view it as am electrical cord coupler, nothing more.

The purpose would be twofold:

(1) to run a LOR controlled channel to the indoors or vice-versa.

or

(2) to facilitate this use of other (existing) household circuits to feed an external LOR controller. Obviously, dedicated circuits outdoors would be cleaner ... but this would be cleaner than running cords out the window.

The more I think about it, the more this could be an alternative to creating a bunch of dedicated circuits. The downside would be extension cords inside the house.

Is this crazy, dangerous ... or does it make sense. I welcome you opinions. I'm just speculating right now.

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This idea is crazy and dangerous, but it makes some sense. What wouldn't work is the fact that you would have a female-female connection. In order to make this a male-female connection, you would need a male-male extension cord to link one side of the outlets to power. This is fine, as long as you plug one end into the non-powered outlet first, then plug the other male side into the powered outlet. If you did this the other way around, you would get a nasty shock if you accidentally touched the live male contact. For this reason, I believe this configuration would be against code. Does this make sense?

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EthanP wrote:

If you did this the other way around, you would get a nasty shock if you accidentally touched the live male contact. For this reason, I believe this configuration would be against code. Does this make sense?

Yes it does. Don't do it.

You are describing a typical "patch cord" concept, which is very cool right up to the point where you have 110 volts spurting out those three prongs in your hand.

Good idea... wrong execution (zap). :D

Charlie
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Push Eject wrote:

You are describing a typical "patch cord" concept, which is very cool right up to the point where you have 110 volts spurting out those three prongs in your hand.

Good idea... wrong execution (zap). :D


Ditto:)
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This would not be a a problem if you used an INLET on the inside, and an OUTLET on the outside - the only thing is you couldn't feed a circut back in, only out. Inlets are commonly used in mobile applications such as rollilng equipment cases used in theatrical applications or bands/DJs. Basically it's a male plug with a mounting ring to mount it. See the attached image.

Attached files 148767=8708-3D189.JPG

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I found it on Grainger.com. as part Number 3D189. They list it as Hubbell # HBL5278C. Grainger list price is $21.60, but I"m sure it can be found cheaper elsewhere. I believe I have seen similar at Home Depot, but I cannot say for sure.



A quick search shows they can be found online for about $10 a piece. That's probably as cheap as they'll ever be.



Also note, these are only rated at 15 Amp. I'm sure they make a 20 amp version (with a 20 A plug)

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Yes they do make them in a 20 amp. They also make them in 30 and 50 amp as well but they are not cheap and you wouldn't need any that big. I have them in my amp rack cases for my soundsytem. As Tom mentioned they are very common in mobile situations.

I don't think I followed it very clear but wouldn't it be like a surge protector? You are just looking to get multiple outlets from one power source correct and have the ability to be able to split that off with other ext cords?

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Thanks for the great replies.

No wonder nobody is doing this ... I figured somehow it was dangerous ... thanks for explaining how and why!

I've decided this is a non-issue for me for now. I'm just going to either do an indoor controller or use X10 for now (and all its limitations, I know).

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