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Weather protection for outside plugs


FarrOut
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An electrician friend of mine recommended using Permatex dielectric tune up grease in the female sockets outside.

He had a tube that he used for motor cycle spark plug wires.  

We squirted some in every socket, both the ones that had something else plugged into them, and the ones that were open.

Looks like it should help.

http://www.permatex.com/products-2/product-categories/specialized-maintenance-repair/electrical-system-maintenance/permatex-dielectric-tune-up-grease-detail

Edited by FarrOut
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Just use horizontal to base down. If using base up, be sure socket has a drain hole. If it doesn't, drill a 1/16th hole next to the center tang (not through the wire) Grease in my 180deg August attic just wouldn't end up good.

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I haven't seen any issues with plugs.

 

I did find that I have blue lights lit when red was on.

When I went to check it out my wires were hidden in J-Channel and there was a puddle of water in the channel.

I no longer put my wires on the bottom J-channel.

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A total waste of time. You wind up with slimy receptacles and little more. I've used thousands (literally) of extension cords (mostly indoor) and hundreds of splitters outside in rain, sun, and snow/ice. Never had a single problem with water ingress in over 30 years. (I HAVE gotten in the habit of elevating connections that are likely to be under water if it rains so the water can drain out.) You can't prevent water from getting in, you can only make sure it has a way to drain out again.

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