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Buying a LOR System


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Hi, all

I'm wanting to buy an LOR 144ch system. What is the Diff between LOR and LORII?

When do they have sales? I have been to the LOR web-site and I see what they cost. Boy hope the wife does not blow up.....;)

I quess what I'm asking should I wait to buy?

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Hi and welcome.

I highly encourage you to read this forum carefully. The questions you ask are routinely answered here. Please also review the information on www.lorwiki.com -- it will help answer the basics for you.

LOR II is the second-generation of Light-O-Rama products. It's nothing you need to worry about since it's a free upgrade for existing LOR users (software and firmware), just be aware that a (rumored to be much) more powerful version of the softwareis coming (hopefully) soon. Nobody knows when (probably not even LOR employees).

As for the sale, yes there's one coming -- sign up for the email list on www.lightorama.com and you can be notified. Again, nobody knows when, or how much, or anything. Last year the sale was in May, and each product had its own discount. LOR products are already competitively priced so don't expect miracles.

-Tim

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With 144 channels, you will want to start your programming now. You can expect to spend about 10-14 hours per 1 minute of songs. I base this on 96 channels last year.



Good luck. You will love the LOR experience. Go ahead and prepare for your extension cords and support materials too.

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I dont want to discourage you. But as Dale said 144 channels is going to take a lot of time. 06' was my first year with LOR and we jumped in head first with 96 channels. However I also started playing with the LOR software back in 04'. And still I wouldn't of had anything close to a decent show if the wife hadnt helped me finish sequincing just before Thanksgiving. It does take a lot of time to do sequinces and the more channels you have the longer its gonna take. You may wanna start a little smaller.

Although I don't know your lifestyle, you may have a lot more time then some of us.

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Yeah, if you're going to go from a stand still...to a flat out sprint, you'll need to spend a lot of time, way before summer even, but I see you're already on your way. If you're going to buy that many boards, I would buy a starter package right now and start working on it before the sale. Although, I wonder if there is a quantity discount available for you now. You may want to talk to Dan about that.

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Jetboat,
I would wait and get them at the sale. There is no real upside to having the controllers now. Not much that you can do with them that you can't do in May or June.
I went from 0 to 184 channels in one swoop and it came off just fine. I waited for the sale and got the controllers in plenty of time to put them all together. If your buying the Showtime products, theres even less of an issue with time.
As long as you keep sequencing, know what everything is going to look like, know where everything is going to go etc. it will simply be a matter of putting everything together come the holiday season.

Good luck!
Tim

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A repost of mine from another thread. Target audience would be those who are getting started in their first year of animation...

I've said this many times. Don't know if people listen or not, but I see some of the same mistakes made every year.

Here is how I got started in '05 with 80 channels.

1) Evaluate my current display. Which elements will I keep? How many channels will those elements use?

2) How many channels can I afford? If this number is less that #1, repeat step one. If more than step #1, see step #3.

3) Buy channels.

4) Design new elements for newly purchased channels.

5) Decide on final layout of display, incorporating new and old elements.

6) Verify electrical loads. Create spreadsheet/document on how you will connect your lights to the controllers.

7) Verify power. Both at the channel level and breaker level. If overloaded at the channel level, redesign display.

8) Only now do you begin the work of sequencing your lights.



Again, using this method I was able to save myself many hours of work. The only reason I had to re-work some of my sequences was because I broke my own rules, and changed some design elements 'late' in the year. (By late, I mean July.)

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Hehehe...I know you are. It will be worth it in the end though so, keep that in mind while your pulling it out. ;)

Jetboat man wrote:

Thank you Tim. I really apreciate it. But I will say I'm pulling what hair I have out....lololo:laughing:
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Jetboat man wrote:

Thanks... I just spent $1375.00 just for a 200amp panel

I hope you mean upgrading to a 200a panel??
We spent over $2500 to have our service feed buried
No more wires in the air!! Really cleaned up the look of the house
With this years purchases I was upset I let the electrician talk me out of a 300a service upgrade. But with LOR I will not need it. This will be my last year as a totally static display

I'll be happy with starting with 48 channels - most of which will go to my mega tree
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