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NOW THE DOORBELL IS A PROBLEM


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:shock::{ It´s me again!!

Now a new problem is... when someone comes to my door and rings, the lights go off and the software gets blocked so i´ve got to start everything again... what should I do??

thanks!!

Polita:happytree:

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I'd unhook the door bell, and put up a sign to like knock, the old fashion way.

Also please fill in your profile info, it's always helpful to others to know where you are if you ever need help. Thanks

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hahahaa yep! that´s what i´ve done! a little sign of... knock the door! hahaha

thank u!

and by the way... how do you do to put that gif image in your signature?

thank u so much!



Polita:happytree:

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yep! just like that! someone comes and rings the bell, and lights go off... let me say that the ringbell is switched to the electricity... I think that the solution will be unplug the ringbell and put a real bell for the season... hehehE:]

Polita:happytree:

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Unless you're using Wireless LOR and a wireless doorbell, I'm truly at a loss why this would be happening.

Or maybe you're so close to popping a breaker that the doorbell pushes you over :laughing:.

Fortunately, nobody ever comes to visit us so our doorbell stays lonely...

-Tim

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Traditional electric powered doorbells typically use a decent sized transformer to throw the hammer that hits some kind of tuned pipe (unless you have an electronic bell) to make the bell sound. I've seen that transformer in many places in houses I've been in over the years, but primarly in the crawlspace, attached near what was probably the most convenient junction box to get 120V from, to run the transformer.

I'm guessing it's actually the transformer creating enough erroneous noise (rougue signal) to confuse the heck out of your LOR signal line. That noise could be strong enough to propogate down the AC line (lines?) and even traverse the Main Breaker panel back down to your controllers. (A lot like the X-10 signal does). It might just be in the proximity of one or more of your controllers or signal line, and a little location adjustment could fix it.

I would start by locating the transformer that runs the bell, and identifying the circuit it rides on, and it's proximity to your LOR network and power sources.

Jeff in Raleigh

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politadiaz wrote:

yep! just like that! someone comes and rings the bell, and lights go off... let me say that the ringbell is switched to the electricity... I think that the solution will be unplug the ringbell and put a real bell for the season... hehehE:]

Polita:happytree:


Well this is a new one on me. I will be sending you an email and asking a few questions if you don't mind.
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yeah yeah! no problem.... I´ll answer enything :}, by the way my ringbell is kind of a chime and it is switched directly to the energy, is very small... I don´t know too much about this, but it is a common chime I think, it is not wireless.

My connection to the pc is USB and the chime is like 5 meters up ahead the LOR card, BUT the ringbell button is like 2 or 3 meters near to the card, sorry about my english, i´m doing my best :laughing:



Thanks!

Polita:happytree:

LightORama wrote:

politadiaz wrote:
yep! just like that! someone comes and rings the bell, and lights go off... let me say that the ringbell is switched to the electricity... I think that the solution will be unplug the ringbell and put a real bell for the season... hehehE:]

Polita:happytree:


Well this is a new one on me. I will be sending you an email and asking a few questions if you don't mind.


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Hmm? Since he will not update profile for location I can assume that he at least lives in a different country as he uses the term meters. Now what I am unsure of is what voltage he operates off of and would that make a difference?

It is always helpful to know where someone lives. If nothing else than to help trouble shoot a problem.

So at least please tell us what country you reside.
Thank you

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Yes yes... i´m sorry i forgot to fix that in my profile... sorry:].

I live in México, and trust me, I don´t have an idea of the voltage and that stuff you ask... SORRY:laughing: I will ask my dad tonight... thanks!!

And by the way... is SHE not HE:laughing:....

THANKS!!

Polita:happytree:

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Sorry about the he she thing! Well you never know I guess.

I know nothing about Mexico but did think maybe the UK or somewhere else where they use a different voltage.

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Maybe they have a high current doorbell like this: http://www.lightorama.com/chimeomatic.html ;)

However, with the comment "the software gets blocked" it seems more like an interference issue rather than a breaker tripping issue. We run into similar issues at our big ham radio station (http://www.nk7u.com) with RF getting into the computers causing lockups. I just can't imagine a doorbell causing enough hash on the AC line or somehow coupling to the CAT5 line to get into the USB port to cause a lockup. Could happen I guess. If there was some sort of hash/arcing when the doorbell was pushed, you may be able to hear it on an AM radio.

I'd disconnect the doorbell.

Jim.

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Most inexpensive doorbells are a simple solenoid. You press the button, the metal center rod shoots up or down, striking one chime, but the striker stays in that position until you release the button, then a spring pushes the metal rod back to were it started, hitting the other chime. Sometimes there is a relay switch involved to help the process.

Ding, Dong. Ding, Dong.

If the solenoid isn't wound well, it can create a strong magnetic field. If the relay contacts are bad, it creates higher frequency noise in the power line that could interfere with the "zero crossing point" of the controllers' Triacs.

Doorbells usually are powered by a transformer for two reasons. It reduces the voltage at the actual door button (so you don't electrocute someone) and it can also block some of the electrical noise since high frequencies won't make it through a power transformer.

Polita, your solution is to disconnect the doorbell or replace it. I'd just disconnect it.

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Polita!

Replacing the doorbell is easy! I had to replace both of mine this year! The directions are easy to follow (only requires a screwdriver) and only takes a couple minutes! However, I'm not sure if you have a Walmart nearby....:laughing:

Good luck!

Kathy

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Sorry if I answer today!, I wasn´t able to get into the web because my internet service was failing...

Thanks to all for ur interest, i went to home depot yesterdey and buy a ringbell that some guys there suggested me, it is an electronic ringbell that doesn´t interfer anymore witht LOR card.

Thanks 4 ur support and we still in contact.

Polita:happytree:

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