Jump to content

Need CAT5 wire pattern


Guest guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Which is correct?

I am having an issue with my line going to the mancave (garage).

How can I check which should be used against the outlet in there?

"PlanetChristmas: Lighting Advice.... and more!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BetterDays wrote:

Which is correct?

I am having an issue with my line going to the mancave (garage).

How can I check which should be used against the outlet in there?

"PlanetChristmas: Lighting Advice.... and more!"


The standard you select (568-A or 568-:), shouldn't matter as long as you use the same standard on each end of the cable. You will end up with a straight pass-thru cable.

You can even make up your own standard - use the colors in alphabetical order - as long as you use the same pattern at both ends. Something other than 568-A and 568-B is just harder for someone else to come along behind you and support.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

BetterDays wrote:

Which is correct?

I am having an issue with my line going to the mancave (garage).

How can I check which should be used against the outlet in there?

"PlanetChristmas: Lighting Advice.... and more!"


Do you mean wiring "punch block" LAN outlets that are marked 568B or 568A?
If that's the case, use the 568B color code wiring diagram.
Be sure you use the "Straight Through" wiring diagrams like the one found HERE.
You don't want the "Crossover" cable.

Is this what you are looking for?

Edit: I see "rsingletary" and I posted almost the same time.
Like he said... just be consistent throughout your entire LAN network.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grinch wrote:

BetterDays wrote:
Which is correct?

I am having an issue with my line going to the mancave (garage).

How can I check which should be used against the outlet in there?

"PlanetChristmas: Lighting Advice.... and more!"


Do you mean wiring "punch block" LAN outlets that are marked 568B or 568A?
If that's the case, use the 568B color code wiring diagram.
Be sure you use the "Straight Through" wiring diagrams like the one found HERE.
You don't want the "Crossover" cable.

Is this what you are looking for?

Edit: I see "rsingletary" and I posted almost the same time.
Like he said... just be consistent throughout your entire LAN network.


Can someone please explain the difference to me?

Thanks!
Kevin
Link to comment
Share on other sites

rsingletary wrote:

You can even make up your own standard - use the colors in alphabetical order - as long as you use the same pattern at both ends. Something other than 568-A and 568-B is just harder for someone else to come along behind you and support.

This is a very bad idea for 2 reasons. First you may end up with a "pair" that consists of 2 single wires from different twisted pairs thus eliminating the benefits of twisted pair wiring. Second, the pairs are arranged in a particular way within the outer insulation so as to reduce crosstalk between pairs. Changing the pairs around can eliminate this benefit.

TED
Link to comment
Share on other sites

BetterDays wrote:

Grinch wrote:
Do you mean wiring "punch block" LAN outlets that are marked 568B or 568A?
If that's the case, use the 568B color code wiring diagram.
Be sure you use the "Straight Through" wiring diagrams like the one found HERE.
You don't want the "Crossover" cable.


Can someone please explain the difference to me?

Thanks!
Kevin

A "strait through" cable is used to connect a device such as a computer to a networking component such as a switch or router. With some older equipment you need a crossover cable to connect networking components together like when a switch is connected to a router. (Newer equipment does not usually require crossover cables because these devices can figure out and use either type of cable.)

From the point of view of the actual wiring the difference between 568A and 568B is that the orange and green pairs are reversed. With 568B the orange pair is connected to pins 1 and 2 and the green pair is connected to pins 3 and 6. With 568A the green pair uses pins 1 and 2 and the orange pair uses pins 3 and 6. In terms of the signal transmission the color does not matter as long as you use the same pattern (either A or :( on both ends of a given cable. If you use A on one end and B on the other end then you have a crossover cable. There's a pretty good explanation of this at the link above.

TED
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with TED. Don't try to just go in some sort of order. Each Pair is trwisted together to eliminate tenuation. Not that you need to know what that means.

The big question is, if you are building your own cable and you purchased a cheap-o crimper and never crimped this type of cable before, good luck.

Chances are you will wind up creating problems that will cause you to pull evrry hair you have out of your head.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John Pidliskey wrote:

Chances are you will wind up creating problems that will cause you to pull evrry hair you have out of your head.

Thankfully, I have very little hair...
No guard on the clippers, but the longest setting.

Easier to keep it short than prove to world how much my hair has actually thinned out.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really, try this trick,

Spend the money on a pre-built cable.

Cut it, then splice in the extended amount of CAT-5 you need.

I use a water proof connecter. Then, I use shrink-tubing over the splice.

I use this for my extended power runs as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wired Cat5 (for the first time) to 14 LOR controllers and didn't have one problem (it suprised me). It only took 4 wires (any color as long as they were the same) to each connector and everything works great.

Just keep the same wire color format for each plug. That's it.

Just my thoughts,

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John Pidliskey wrote:

Really, try this trick,

Spend the money on a pre-built cable.

Cut it, then splice in the extended amount of CAT-5 you need.

I use a water proof connecter. Then, I use shrink-tubing over the splice.

I use this for my extended power runs as well.



This has already been run through conduit, so I will try the new plug wiring first.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...