Jump to content
Light-O-Rama Forums

Recommended Posts

Kudos Bob, really appreciate all you do.

Question on how to,

Adding RGB channels, 150  under the same group, is there any way to make these all list automatically with the same unit ID in all of them and map out the circuit numbers in sequence instead of doing it individually?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos Bob, really appreciate all you do.

Question on how to,

Adding RGB channels, 150  under the same group, is there any way to make these all list automatically with the same unit ID in all of them and map out the circuit numbers in sequence instead of doing it individually?

 

Hmmm... "Yes, but". 

 

First, you mean 150 RGB channels, not 150 channels, right? That is, you mean 450 channels grouped three apiece into 150 RGB channels, as opposed to 150 channels grouped three apiece into 50 RGB channels?

 

I'll give two suggestions.  The first won't work in this particular situation, due to the number of channels.  However, I just want to mention it because I think it would be the easiest way, if you were using less channels.  The second way will work for you, but will be a few more clicks.

 

(1) If you were using 16 RGB channels (48 channels) or less, then I think the quickest way to do it would be this: Right click on the button of some existing channel or RGB channel or whatever.  From the popup menu that opens, select "Insert Device", then either "Insert Device Above" or "Insert Device Below".  A dialog will open asking you about the device you want to insert.

 

Set the "Device" dropdown box to "RGB Device (Non-CCD)".  Set the name of the device, make sure "Add as a group" is checked, set the channel mode appropriately (i.e. "RGBRGBRGB" or "RRRGGGBBB"), pick the unit ID and network, set "Channels" to 48 (or whatever), and "Channels per Unit ID" to the same number.  Then click OK.

 

But that won't work for you, since you're using more than 48 channels.  So:

 

(2) The high-level idea here is: ( a ) Add 450 channels that are automatically populated with stuff like unit/circuit.  ( b ) Convert them to 150 RGB channels.  ( c ) Stick those 150 RGB channels into a group.  And here are the details of how to do it:

 

Go to "Tools", then "Channel Configuration".  In the Channel Configuration dialog, click "Add Controller".   Choose the device type and such, then set "Channels" to "464 Channels" (it only allows groups of 16, so you can't say 450, but we'll clean up the 14 extras later).  Click "OK to exit the Channel Configuration dialog.

 

Now you've got 464 new channels at the end of your sequence (or track).  They're all set up with the unit ID that you chose, and circuit IDs from 1 to 464.  Now we want to convert them to RGB channels:

 

Right click on the first, and select "Convert to RGB Channel".  The "RGB Channel Conversion" dialog will open.  Choose the name of the RGB channel, not including the pixel ID (that will be done automatically for you) - for example, maybe "My RGB Device".  Check the "Also do this for following channels", and say to create 150 RGB channels.  Click OK.

 

Now you've got 150 RGB channels, all named like "My RGB Device 1", "My RGB Device 2", and so forth.  You've also got 14 "leftover" channels, but forget about them for the moment.  What we want to do next is put all 150 RGB channels into a group:

 

Right click on the first, and select "Convert to Group".  Give the group a name (e.g. "My RGB Device").  Leave "First in group" as "My RGB Device 1"; change "Last in group" to "My RGB Device 150".  Click "Create Group".

 

Now you've got a group called "My RGB Device", which contains 150 RGB channels called "My RGB Device 1", "My RGB Device 2", and so on.  Those RGB channels are set up with the unit/network you chose, and with circuits ranging from 1 to 450.  I think this was your end goal, right?

 

If so, then all that's left to do is to clean up a loose end: Getting rid of those 14 "extra" channels.  You could delete them one by one, but I find the following little trick makes deleting a block of channels easier:

 

(1) Convert them to a group.  (2) Delete that group.

 

I hope this helps.  If you have any additional questions on this, please let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, thank you so much, this is what I was looking to do. Amazing!

Go to "Tools", then "Channel Configuration".  In the Channel
Configuration dialog, click "Add Controller".   Choose the device type
and such, then set "Channels" to "464 Channels" (it only allows groups
of 16, so you can't say 450, but we'll clean up the 14 extras later). 
Click "OK to exit the Channel Configuration dialog.


 


Now you've got 464 new channels at the end of your sequence (or
track).  They're all set up with the unit ID that you chose, and circuit
IDs from 1 to 464.  Now we want to convert them to RGB channels:


 


Right click on the first, and select "Convert to RGB Channel".  The
"RGB Channel Conversion" dialog will open.  Choose the name of the RGB
channel, not including the pixel ID (that will be done automatically for
you) - for example, maybe "My RGB Device".  Check the "Also do this for
following channels", and say to create 150 RGB channels.  Click OK.


 


Now you've got 150 RGB channels, all named like "My RGB Device 1",
"My RGB Device 2", and so forth.  You've also got 14 "leftover"
channels, but forget about them for the moment.  What we want to do next
is put all 150 RGB channels into a group:


 


Right click on the first, and select "Convert to Group".  Give the
group a name (e.g. "My RGB Device").  Leave "First in group" as "My RGB
Device 1"; change "Last in group" to "My RGB Device 150".  Click "Create
Group".


 


Now you've got a group called "My RGB Device", which contains 150 RGB
channels called "My RGB Device 1", "My RGB Device 2", and so on.  Those
RGB channels are set up with the unit/network you chose, and with
circuits ranging from 1 to 450.  I think this was your end goal, right?


 


If so, then all that's left to do is to clean up a loose end: Getting
rid of those 14 "extra" channels.  You could delete them one by one,
but I find the following little trick makes deleting a block of channels
easier:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New video: Windows Shell Commands.  This is a way to get LOR to tell your computer to do... something... whenever a particular sequence starts up.  More or less anything you can tell your computer to do, you can tell LOR to tell your computer to do.

 

Warning: This video is over 20 minutes long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, Can you give me a hint on how to use a music video to create a sequence and then display the video while also displaying the sequenced lights? Hope that made sense.

 

Chip

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess that was not clear at all. Looks like by using windows shell commands I can activate the video along with the sequence.

 

I will try to be more specific in the future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is there any place where we will be able to find these videos in the future? Let's say looking for them next year.

 

Thanks. I haven't seen these until it showed up under view new content. I know I'll forget about them in a few months, but would like to know if they are in the tutorial video section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indi....its a sticky at the top of this forum...LOR S3 Software Suite 

Found it.

 

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess that was not clear at all. Looks like by using windows shell commands I can activate the video along with the sequence.

 

I will try to be more specific in the future.

 

Hi, I'm sorry, I missed your original question.  You're correct that you can use Windows shell commands.  You might also want to consider building the sequence with a video file instead of an audio file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New video: Fade Down Up Chase.  This is just a little example of using the Chase, Copy/Paste Multiple, and Fill tools.  It results in an inverted fade being chased through an all-on background.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×