Jump to content
Light-O-Rama Forums

Upgrading LOR1602W to 40amps


bwaldrep

Recommended Posts

If I want to upgrade a LOR1602W to handle 40amps (20amps on both sides) I know I need to replace the 2 power cables to 20amp 12/3 cables, and change the fuses to 20amps, but does anything else need to be changed?

Looking at the LOR1602W, each input power cable go to each fuse, and then from the fuses to the power switch, and then to the circuit board. The current cables from the fuse to the switch, and switch to the board are 14AWG cable, so wouldn't this also need to be changed to 12AWG? (In my mind, why upgrade the power cable, if the internal cables are still 14AWG)

I also see 2 spots on the board where a fuse could be placed, why are those there?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Up to a four foot length, you can use 14 awg wire. The board has two fuse holders because the board is also sold by itself, without the case and cables. In this case you would install the fuses directly on the board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you upgrade the board to 40 amps, then EVERY ELEMENT of the 2 20 amp circuits must be rated for 20 amps. For each circuit, this would be the breaker, the wiring to the outlet, the outlet, the plug, the plug wire, and the fuze inside the LOR.

The plug/outlet are the 'T' shaped ones rather than the 'I I' shaped ones which most common.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being a 1602W, I believe it should have come with the high power heat sinks, and the heat sinks connected to the metal case for even more heat transfer...

I've only ever upgraded one to 40A. I figured that since I was voiding the UL listing anyway, that I would go with the most reliable configuration, and eliminate any question about the current rating of the fuse holders, switches, and associated wiring. I ran my new 20A cords directly to the controller (the hot leads do not go to the same place the do in the standard configuration) and installed the 20 A fuses directly on the card. The inner face was completely removed.

If you go this way, you want to be completely sure that the fuses really are connected in line. Probably a good idea to test that they are, but don't cook yourself while testing. I would probably:


1) Leave the fuses out, plug both leads in, and ensure that the controller does not come on.
2) Unplug the controller.
3) Add the fuse to the right side. Plug in both sides. Ensure that the controller powers up. Try to turn on a string of lights on the left side to ensure that they do not power up.
4) Unplug the controller.
5) Add the fuse to the left side, plug the controller in, and ensure that everything works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know someone who upgraded their setup to 20 amps PER CHANNEL. I wouldn't recommend it. His heat sinks were very large. He has since gone the DIY route, putting the 20 amp channels near the load, and no more than 2 channels per enclusre. He brought the two-channel controllers to an animated lights group meeting I went to.

He was looking to run motors, and used the heat sinks to handle the heat the inductive kickback causes.

He is aware that these mods invalidate warranties.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the info.

To address a few comments. I have already run 4 dedicated 20 amp GFCI protected circuits to recepticles outside, with a in use weather covers.

I'm probably going to upgrade one of my showtime devices to 40 amps, just to make sure I have enough juice in one area of my display.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...