Jump to content

Thunderstorms to Thundersnow


Guest guest
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest guest

Different kinds of weather events will affect us doing showtime (Christmas, Thanksgiving, 4th, Halloween, etc...).



From thunderstorms to thundersnow... what do you do?



Post a comment, reason, or etc below. This should make an interesting discussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

In the event of rain, keep it running. I do not like the idea of deflated inflatables getting filled up with water.

However, if it really starts to pop lightning like candy, I will turn off the lights and power to the controllers at the breakers. I do not want to have to replace valuable equipment. But will still leave inflatables going.

The controllers themselves are installed in NEMA 3 boxes and are essentially weatherproof. No need to disconnect anything as it too hard to reconnect in the dark after the rain subsides.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

I just don't worry about it. Maybe I should disconnect it but I doubt it would fry everything, fuses should handle most of it.

Edit: Come to think of it in Canada I get VERY few rainstorms during the display season and almost NO thunderstorms.

Zac

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

I tend to let it run until the GFI breaker trips. Since it is still somewhat warm here in November, It is not uncommon to see rain. I hope to wrap all connections this year to prevent this from happening again. I only had 3 days last year with no lights on due to rain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

Hmmm...

I would think the most vulnerable items are the controllers. Especially the network connection through the cat5 cable. Cat5 cable is a notorious lightning magnet, depending on it's termination characteristics, and I don't know if the CTB-16D etc are protected in any way from an induced spike from (say) lightning. RS485 transceiver may have ESD protection but, in my view, it's unlikely to survive a ligtning spike.

In my view the only way to be as sure as you can would be to disconnect EVERYTHING from any possible path to earth. However, I realise that that would be extremely impraticable :shock:

What say you?

Martin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

If it is raining I shut everything down. I am not talking a sprinkle or two but when the rain comes down everything goes off. The next day I start checking everything after it has had some time to dry out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

We tend to get at least one good thunderstorm during te lighting season the last few years.. you could calculate the lengths of wire in every strand of lights and figure you have that many feet, yards, miles of antenna. Reference Ben Franklin and his kite. Not much that you can do with that amount of wire. It would make sence to disconnect the expensive stuff from the antenna. Mainly the computer and controllers but only if there were lightening present. Keep your insurance up to date... And enjoy the light show



Joe

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

The first time I've seen the term "thundersnow" outside of a weather book. Thanks!:]

we mostly get rain and wind. I usually run my display anyway. Haven't had any problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

I would disconnect from the computer in the case of lighting... I keep the show running through all weather conditions in the winter. Rain, snow .....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest guest

I use 130v. MOV's on all my controller power inputs. I do this mainly for chopping the spike that happens when you turn off incuctive loads. Yes, there can be a huge spike because I run a few motors in the display.

A by-product of this is some lightning protection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...