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lor unit/channel assignments


Gerald Corey
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What are the uses of the 0A, 0B, etc units after Unit 09 in the Channels listings of the LOR boxes? I see Unit 10 after 0F. I previously just reassigned them to Unit 10, 11, etc and then when I got to Unit 10 made it Unit 16 and so on. Seemed to work as assigned. Just not sure if I should do something else or does it matter?
Thanks,

Rosemary

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As long as your unit numbers match on the hardware, and the sequence editor, you will be fine.

The reason for the alphabet soup ID's goes back to the deluxe controllers, and the allowed 240 controllers per network. Using just decimal numbers, it would take three dials, and extra electronics and software, as compared to using two dials with 16 positions each.

Choosing not to use the 0A-0F, 1A-1F .... AA-EF addresses is really no different than if you arbitrarily decided that you were only going to use numbers with digits from 0-7. You leave a number of valid addresses unused, and as a result, you limit your maximum number of controllers you can connect.. In your case, using just 0-9 digits, you will only be able to speak to 99 controllers. Of course, at that point, you could go back and start filling in the gaps.

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Rosemary,

It's confusing, but these pertain to hexidecimal numbers in programming. This was important when you set the number of controllers in your hardware utility. If you set the maximum controllers to 10 and one of your controllers had a unit ID of 10 it would NOT be found. This is because the tenth controller is ID OA. If you have a controller set to ID 10, that is actually controller number 16. Totally confused now?

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Denny wrote:

Rosemary,

It's confusing, but these pertain to hexidecimal numbers in programming. This was important when you set the number of controllers in your hardware utility. If you set the maximum controllers to 10 and one of your controllers had a unit ID of 10 it would NOT be found. This is because the tenth controller is ID OA. If you have a controller set to ID 10, that is actually controller number 16. Totally confused now?


Thankfully the newer hardware utility with 2.1.6 (actually probably earlier) changed that field from max controller number to max ID, so that is no longer an issue...
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Actually, it is based on the hexadecimal numbering system (base 16) that is used in all digital computing.

Hex decimal hexadecimal

0000 0 00

0001 1 01

0010 2 02

.

.

1001 9 09

1010 10 0a

1011 11 0b

It all has to do wth bits and bytes - which computer systems operate on. wikipedia has a pretty good page on this subject:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexadecimal

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sjmiller, you done a fine job of illustrating some of the 3 major ways of counting.

But sir your first columun is mistaking labeled. It is not HEX, but binary.

Otherwise a fine job and beat me to the punch.

rosemary on a side note. Computers only know two states. Either a data bit (one unit where as byte is 8 units) is either one or off or 1 or zero. I can not articulate this next bit of info, but programmers at one time programmed in Octal which is a count of 0 - 7. Then they went to Hex which is a count of 16, 0 - 15. This is what we are doing when we set the ID of the controller. We are programming in that ID. And as it has been noted earlier we can program the ID of 0 - 255 to each controller. Thats because 00 in hex equals 0 in decimal and FF in hex equals 255 in decimal. Just a bit more to confuse you if the right hand place equals 1 - 15, then the left hand place is a number multiplied by 16. As someone else noted 10 in hex is 16. and h20 (a small "h'" in front of a number indicates the following numbers are in Hex format) equals 32. Ok so here is an case example but now I will throw in a right hand number too. What do you think h37 equals? Well first we take the left number and translate it to decimal. 3 X 16 = 48 + 7 from the right side = 56. One more but a bit more tricky h2C. This would be 2 X 16 =32 plus c = 12 (A =10, B=11 and C=12) so we now have 32+12=44.

Sorry if that bored you, but one last little tidbit in binary 16 is 1111. Remember those are bits, ones or zeros. And when you have 4 bits it is called a nibble, 8 are a byte and 16 area word.

Gee everything you always wanted to know about computers, NOT.. LOL

Sorry

Max

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Max-Paul wrote:

And as it has been noted earlier we can program the ID of 0 - 255 to each controller.

Actually, controllers can have an ID of 1 - 240. That's 01 through F0. If you set the rotary switches in a controller to 00 it will reset the controller. F1 through FF are probably "reserved for future use", but please correct me if they're actually used.
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Steven,

You are more than likely right. A feeble light is going off in my head about some kind of restrictions. I know that there are a few members who might get close to using 240 controllers. I just kind of got carried away with my explaining Hex.

Thanks for the correction.

Max

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Years ago, I could almost read ascii text in a hex dump as fast as the ascii panel next to it. Now days, most of the time, I can recognize or name the multiples of 16 (in decimal) under 255, and am almost as fast a couple of powers of 2 either side of that.. Same for identifying the closest 2^^x (x<8) under a given number. I'm best at it when I've been helping people prep for their CCENT, or CCNA exams recently.

But, if LOR had never built a switch configurable controller, there would no longer be clear reason to preferentially represent the unit ID in hex instead of decimal. If all the controllers were addressed through the hardware utility, why would the hardware utility and sequence editor have any reason that they should present it as hex instead of 1-240 decimal? After all, IPv4 addresses are 8 bytes.. They could easily be represented as a 8 digit hexidecimal number, and it would be the closest parallel to how the bits are encoded in the packets, but you virtually never see it represented that way. (though supernetting and subnetting would in some cases be easier in hex) Same here. If it were not for the switch configurable hardware providing the preference for a hex, I would expect the unit addressing to be presented in decimal. One more reason to back that up: All numbers stored in a computer are stored in binary, even if they are stored as ascii string representations, they still stored in binary. However, in all high level programming languages that I am aware of, what is the numeric representation that is the default for application user interaction? I can't think of any exceptions to it being decimal. I can think of environments I have worked in where there was no native support to accept a hex number from the user, and stuff it into an integer. If you wanted to interact with the user in hex, you had to collect it as a string, and then convert it to decimal, then stuff it in the integer.

And now, I've succeeded in providing an answer just as un helpful to the OP's question as most of this thread. :D By the way Rosemary, did we manage to answer your question to your satisfaction somewhere in all this?

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klb - we all probaby confused the hell out of Rosemary - after all it was a really simple question to start wth:)

The question we should have asked is how many controllers do you have, the answer would have been relevant, now we sound like blow hards - pontificating...:shock:

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