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Labels for light cords.


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I have looked through the forum, but could not find this thread. What is a good way to label your cords? Very wet, cold environment, wondering about what may hold up better. 
Thank You! 

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A lot of what I use is color codes.  You can use color marking tape (available from Home Depot or Lowes), but I prefer colored Heat Shrink tubing (my color sets came from Amazon).  I have all 10 colors of the electronic resistor color code and just a little quarter inch or so length is all it takes.  If it is something that will have more than 9 (such as the 26 strings of my pixel tree), each cable is marked with two color - for example string one is black ( 0 ) and brown ( 1 ), and string 26 is red ( 2 ) and blue ( 6 ).  You do have to remember which digit is first if there are more than one.  My standard is that the the first digit color is towards the middle of the cable and the last digit is closest to the connector on the end.  This obviously works better if you know the resistor color code...  If this does not make sense, I can post photos.

 

 

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I have generic lengths, I identify them by stripe of colored electrical tape. I don't like labeling a cord for a specific item, this saves me time during set up.  

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I sue a Mix (cuz I changed my mind along the way)

I use large (Colored) Flag zip ties:  D1-8, S1-8 (no 16 porters) because I have both types of controllers in the same CG1500.

I also put a Yellow Zip near the connectors on the 4-core cables and Orange on my 3 Core because the look the same except when looking at the pins.

On my AC cords, I just use a different colored zip at each end (and I have 3 colors of SPT), It is rare I have more than 3 cords to the same prop that are not ner the controller,so tracing is easy the Brown(cord) w/blu is not on

 

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Last year I bought these on amazon and printed 2 copies. I've found them to be weather proof. At least so far!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B086895XMS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

When I first got into LOR and started making my own cables, I did make them to length for each prop. Maybe it was a mistake, but it saved me a lot of zip cord. I guess the right thing would have been to move the controllers closer to the props, but I live on a corner and am the first house in the neighborhood and don't want them walking away. So, I label both ends with the controller number/channel and prop. and I bundle them into a couple of snakes so that all of the 16 mega tree cables are together and all of the 10 mini trees are together. I run the snake out to prop area and then it's easy to know what goes where. At the controller, all the ends are right there and, again, it's easy to see what goes where. 

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2 minutes ago, tlogan said:

Last year I bought these on amazon and printed 2 copies. I've found them to be weather proof. At least so far!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B086895XMS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

When I first got into LOR and started making my own cables, I did make them to length for each prop. Maybe it was a mistake, but it saved me a lot of zip cord. I guess the right thing would have been to move the controllers closer to the props, but I live on a corner and am the first house in the neighborhood and don't want them walking away. So, I label both ends with the controller number/channel and prop. and I bundle them into a couple of snakes so that all of the 16 mega tree cables are together and all of the 10 mini trees are together. I run the snake out to prop area and then it's easy to know what goes where. At the controller, all the ends are right there and, again, it's easy to see what goes where. 

I found using tape type flags subject to easy damage as they all end up in the same area (controller end).

I use my sharpie to write length on the Vampire Plug. But I am learning to make Groups of standard lengths  (n x 5') to avoid massive coils that love to get snarled.  (I also mark pre-made cords near the plug. Stupid Walmart 50' cords can vary up to 1/2 foot (shorter. cut wire, then attach ends logic vs finished length)

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I had that problem when I as using masking tape! These in particular seem to be pretty tear resistant. This will be my second year using them, so we'll see how they hold up.

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I use a combination of different color zip cord and color coded zip ties for all of my groupsprops and spt cords to easily identify groupings and individual props within each grouping.  Each prop will generally be in the same location and cords are cut to each specific length plus about 5’ extra to allow for installer error.

For example, everything on the house uses white zip cord.  My house roof lines all start with a Blue zip tie against every male and /or female plug on prop and cable.  To indicate each prop in that grouping, I then use a second colored zip tie (Orange for my second story roofline) next to the first away from plug.

I then color code on my printed channel layout list with highlighters or markers to match each grouping and individual prop.

Controller 1, Channel 1 - Roofline, 2nd story - White Cord/Blue/Orange.

Controller 1, Channel 2 - Roofline, Dormer - White Cord/Blue/Green

Controller 1, Channel 10 - Window Surround, Garage - White Cord/Orange/Yellow

Controller 2, Channel 1 - Mini Tree 1, Red Lights - Green Cord/Red/Red

Controller 2, Channel 5 - Mini Tree 2, Red Lights - Green Cord/White/Red

It’s a lot of zip ties, but it works for my AC channel display.  It may get more complicated in larger displays than mine.

.

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I know this won't work for everyone but I use blue painters tape with a black sharpie pen and label both ends. I just use unit numbers and channel numbers. For example 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 etc. I then use white kitchen trash bags to group props like mini trees, medium trees and arches. I then put the bags in wheeled trash cans so when I'm setting things up I can just grab the bag I need for each element. Since I cover my controllers with black contractor bags the male ends hold up great. So far the female ends are doing pretty good too. But when needed I can just rip off the old and replace with a new tag. 

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I go with a low tech solution.  A strip of duct tape with the channel or port number written on it in sharpie.  At the end of the season I use a sharpie to fix any numbers that have faded or replace any duct tape that has reached the point where it is no longer usable.

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Similar to other here who have posted, in my bundles of 3 cords (one for Red, Green, and White) I wrap a piece of Colored Electrical Tape on each end to label which color strand goes to what cord.  Around the whole bundle I tape the 3 together using black electrical tape and use a plain Label maker to label the cord bundle.  I also use the Label Maker for all the regular cords as well.  Most my controllers are covered or darn close, so I put the labels toward the Male end and they have help up for several years.

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I use a brother strip printer and then I coat them with some Loctite transparent flexible sealant to seal them onto the cables. I have also used clear 5 minute epoxy.

Edited by Timothy
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