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RGB color correction


Dr_Aplet
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Has anyone found that the color pallet, when building a sequence is not even close to what comes on the lights?  While sequencing I select a color and build a sequence only to find that it doesn't come out at all on my 10w RGB Color Floods.  For example i picked orange but it came out white. same with purple?  What i have found to do is go to the hardware settings and manually dial the colors in.  I set the base color then add the complementary color and calculate the number by multiplying by 2.55

what i mean:

to get orange

on the "LOR hardware"  

Red =100%
Green= 2%

100 = 255 in the color pallet
Red= 255
Blue=0
green= 2% X2.55= 5

in the sequencer in the color pallet put in those numbers and you will get that color.  That's a lot of work to go through and it looks like red in the color pallet. Is there anything that can be done?  Do I need to do a hardware compensation? I don't want to spend forever building a sequence that looks like I am color blind.

Edited by Dr_Aplet
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I just mix my own in the rgb channel and those use percentages. There is also a presets button in the toolbar next to the intensity dialog where you can save your favorites. After 10 yrs I pretty much know what to expect. I rarely use the color tool except in motion effects and as you say a good orange is brown or red.

I also have pixels and floods hooked up most of the time for verification.

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Here is my standard recommendation.  Hook up the lights - preferably in the location where they will be used - and use the hardware utility to play with levels while you watch the actual lights.  Once you get the color that you want, document it.  Repeat for other RGB lights.  Each set of RGB lights WILL look at least a bit different.  Even different batches of the same pixels from the same source will likely look a little different.

Standard recommendation #2 is unless you really need to, stick with the three primary colors (Red, Green, & Blue), the three secondary colors (Yellow , Cyan, & Purple), and White.  White will require playing with it to get the same white across different props.  I use Orange a lot and it takes very subtle adjustment to get a good orange.

BTW, the reason for testing the lights in the location where they will be used is because background will affect the "look".  This is more true when the lights will be lighting up your house or in close proximity to structure.  Think about this.  A flood light that is illuminating the front wall of your house will look massively different if your house is red brick vs white stucco.

 

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13 hours ago, Dr_Aplet said:

Has anyone found that the color pallet, when building a sequence is not even close to what comes on the lights?  While sequencing I select a color and build a sequence only to find that it doesn't come out at all on my 10w RGB Color Floods.

Yup... When in the Hardware Utility if you test with Purple it will look Purple, but not when using the windows color palette in Sequencer.. I have also found that the intensity plays a big factor in the color... Yes it was disappointing to see what looked very good on the PC screen only to be way off when viewing the lights playing outside.. So I just consider it another Lesson learned and another software compensation that needed to be made..

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34 minutes ago, Jimehc said:

Yup... When in the Hardware Utility if you test with Purple it will look Purple, but not when using the windows color palette in Sequencer.. I have also found that the intensity plays a big factor in the color... Yes it was disappointing to see what looked very good on the PC screen only to be way off when viewing the lights playing outside.. So I just consider it another Lesson learned and another software compensation that needed to be made..

It’s not an”software” compensation (whatever that means) problem.

Its learning that not all colors are going to look well with whatever the background maybe.

You have to “learn” what looks best in your show. No “color compensation” is going to look good for all. That’s why there is a spectrum.

JR

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Quote

When in the Hardware Utility if you test with Purple it will look Purple, but not when using the windows color palette in Sequencer..

There was no background - it was the color selection and the actual color of the bulb....

Edited by Jimehc
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The intensity plays a part.  When I first got into pixels, the original setup was all at 100% and I had to tone everything down.    Then once I discovered I could reduce the pixel intensity (in my case in preview using Dimming curve), it made it so much better.   But I found there was a point where it went the other way where too dim didn't show enough of the colors I wanted.  

In your case, since its a flood, the point was a flood on blank background will give different colors of a flood on a white background (and everything in between).

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