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I would like to clear something up.


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Yes we all are a bunch of OLD Farts here because my first computer was a Radio Shack TRS 80 using DOS operating system with 4K memory and was released in 1977 when i was 13 years old.

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Oh come on...you are all newbies! My first computer wasn't mine rather the USAF's but it was analog and was embedded into an F4. I was working on Mainframes when the first TRS80 came out, then Commodore64's. I still didn't own one till I built my first 386. I had more mainframe power at my fingertips at work than most people ever saw in the lifetimes. First mainframe though was a SEL 840A along with a mag tape drive but used an ASR33 Teletype with a paper tape reader to load the bootstrap so the mag tape would run. My first code was machine code directly to the CPU which we use to be able to repair!. Tons of ECL logic cards and (4) 8K core memory modules, 24 bit machine. CPU was huge with four major double-sided backplanes that swung outward and this was just the actual processor(CPU). Nowadays the internal parts of a CPU are so small that you require a very high-powered microscope or more. Yeah, technology has changed a lot over a very amount of time. My watch has more computing power than the main CPU in the Apollo capsules. This laptop I'm on this second has more power than the original Univac computer that helped develop the atomic bomb.

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2 minutes ago, dgrant said:

Oh come on...you are all newbies! My first computer wasn't mine rather the USAF's but it was analog and was embedded into an F4. I was working on Mainframes when the first TRS80 came out, then Commodore64's. I still didn't own one till I built my first 386. I had more mainframe power at my fingertips at work than most people ever saw in the lifetimes. First mainframe though was a SEL 840A along with a mag tape drive but used an ASR33 Teletype with a paper tape reader to load the bootstrap so the mag tape would run. My first code was machine code directly to the CPU which we use to be able to repair!. Tons of ECL logic cards and (4) 8K core memory modules, 24 bit machine. CPU was huge with four major double-sided backplanes that swung outward and this was just the actual processor(CPU). Nowadays the internal parts of a CPU are so small that you require a very high-powered microscope or more. Yeah, technology has changed a lot over a very amount of time. My watch has more computing power than the main CPU in the Apollo capsules. This laptop I'm on this second has more power than the original Univac computer that helped develop the atomic bomb.

USAF always had the good stiff while we Marines had the hand me downs

 

 

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4 hours ago, weigh2fast4u@yahoo.com said:

Lol this thread went WAY far away from what I said in the beginning. Lol 

Is that me…. Is that you

criss cross applesauce 

Edited by dibblejr
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9 hours ago, weigh2fast4u@yahoo.com said:

Lol this thread went WAY far away from what I said in the beginning. Lol 

They usually do dibble, I mean Chance.

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15 hours ago, weigh2fast4u@yahoo.com said:

Lol this thread went WAY far away from what I said in the beginning. Lol 

Yeah, just having fun 

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  • 1 month later...
On 9/1/2021 at 11:43 PM, Don said:

Loved my TI 99/4a. Was my first PC.
2400 baud was my first modem.

I'm not as old as some of you. :) I feel better now.

Im coming to this thread late!   Im old too.   TI 99/4a was my first owned computer.  It used the tv for a monitor and had NO hard drive.  I had to use a cassette tape player to save my basic programs.  Watching the tape counter was the only way to find and not overwrite your programs.  But three years before that in 1977 I took my first college programming class in Fortran.  No monitors at all and no disk storage.  I had to type my programs and the input data onto punched cards and kept a rubber band around the deck to keep them in order.   It was unforgiving of typos.  Each time I wanted to run the program I had to wait in line at the card reader machine then wait for the printout.  It told me if the compile was a success and then ran the program which had to output its results to paper.   Having a screen to see my typing and correct it and switching to a cassette tape to save my work was a big upgrade back then. 

Edited by ItsMeBobO
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On 9/2/2021 at 10:26 AM, dibblejr said:

You meant to say Morris Code and or telegraph. When I joined the USMC and went to Japan the only way to comm back home was via the USO and the telegraph i think.  Always could hear the person repeating what I was saying. Because of miss communication the old technology made me miss the fact that my Grandfather was very sick and dying. 

JR

I joined 1997 and was a Morse Code operator but they ended up phasing it out after about 10 years or less.  It's almost like when my Father-in-Law came in as a Flame Thrower and they phased that out after a few years...of course, not as cool...

haha.

Semper Fi.

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On 9/2/2021 at 9:58 AM, hasslerk said:

I still have mine in a box in the basement, along with the 12" black and white TV I used with it and the cassette tape player used for backups.

I also still have all my punch cards from college (CoBOL and Fortran decks) which were executed via the College's NCR mainframe (circa 1981).

Yes I am old.

Hey ! Another cassette player guy! I missed it earlier.    My HS class was 1976 but no computer classes were offered till college. I learned CoBOL in 1983 and got paid to do it until about 1996.  A lot of VSAM DB2 JCL CICS and even some assembly language in there.  I did a few years around '86 on some portable hand held computers with radios inside and tiny screens which were used in huge warehouses for pick bins.   Then we started upgrading our entire software inventory to com/DLLs for YK2.  I did a lot of years on the huge footprint  IBM monochrome terminals which were 80x24 characters (no color or pictures) and the keyboard was like a brick.  

IBM_3277_Model_2_terminal.jpg

 

 

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1 hour ago, ItsMeBobO said:

Hey ! Another cassette player guy! I missed it earlier.    My HS class was 1976 but no computer classes were offered till college. I learned CoBOL in 1983 and got paid to do it until about 1996.  A lot of VSAM DB2 JCL CICS and even some assembly language in there.  I did a few years around '86 on some portable hand held computers with radios inside and tiny screens which were used in huge warehouses for pick bins.   Then we started upgrading our entire software inventory to com/DLLs for YK2.  I did a lot of years on the huge footprint  IBM monochrome terminals which were 80x24 characters (no color or pictures) and the keyboard was like a brick.  

IBM_3277_Model_2_terminal.jpg

 

 

IBM 3270 (green screen) 1/2 duplex EBCDiC. those things were heavy  only topped by the 5080 Color CAD terminal

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16 hours ago, ItsMeBobO said:

My HS class was 1976 but no computer classes were offered till college. I learned CoBOL in 1983 and got paid to do it until about 1996.  A lot of VSAM DB2 JCL CICS and even some assembly language in there. 

Sounds familiar! HS, 74, Learned CoBOL early 80s (whatever year it was under Reagan that the Air Traffic Controllers went on strike and got fired...there were three of them in my class!). Lots of CoBOL, JCL, Utilities (SYNCSORT!), CICS, Fortran, VSAM, DB2, IDMS. Programmed into the mid 2000s. I did some pretty amazing things in the early 2000s with IDMS for the government but they kept saying it couldn't be done (no matter how times we demo'd it)  and then never implemented it.  Got into management  and came back to it for a while in 2014 for a year. And it all came back to me in no time...like a bad dream! Back to management now.  Close to retiring but think I could code CoBOL forever if I could something 100% remote.

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PDP1104 used for an remote site alarm system.  If we had to do a completely cold start, we had to open a book with around 30 lines of printed data.  For each line, there was (I think) 8 binary bits for address and 8 binary bits of data.  The computer had a row of toggle switches for the address and data and then one for load.  You loaded in the around 30 bytes and pressed run.  That was the bootstrap.  After that it would load the program and remote alarm configuration from paper tape using a model 35 teletype machine.  That got retired in the mid 1980s.

 

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8 hours ago, tlogan said:

whatever year it was under Reagan that the Air Traffic Controllers went on strike and got fired

That was 81.  My cousin Gustave was controller LaGuardia and was fired.   ~1984 I went to his graduation from chiropractic school in Brooklyn. 

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Another cassette user here too on my first computer, a TRS-80 Model 1.  I, got my first computer when RS released the old Model I TRS-80 right after I got out of High School, 4K Ram, monochrome {black and white monitor, 4K RAM {I ran out of Ram with the first program I ever wrote for it!  And that was on the same day I got it home and set it up! LOL}, No Hard Drives or Floppy diskettes were available, paid 5++ times more for it than any home system out here today.  Had to take out a loan to buy it, glad those days are gone!   Then the expansion interface came out for it, then floppy drives, 5-1/4" diskettes, and upgradable to 16K, finally 5 MB Hard drives became available and went up from there.  Then a TRS-80 Color Computer, back to cassette again, UGH, but also used game cartridges, which was pretty awesome at the time., then the others started coming out from them like the Model 2 and Model 3 systems, which were big improvements.  I actually started operating a BBS system on a Model 3 TRS-80 and moved up to an IBM Clone later on with more options and power, a whole whopping 64K ram and color monitor, had a lot of ANSI games on my BBS as well for users to play, also had Fido-Net messaging system and another messaging system that came out a few years later down the road, can't recall the name of that one.  Last BBS Software I ran was called TriBBS, then quite a few years running that and the internet finally went public and the BBS systems basically fell by the wayside.  Of course, I started with a 300baud modem, then 2400, and finally ended on that note with a 56K modem.  And I do remember when AOL was the only BBS type option available too, and expensive too at the time.

And when I took programming classes in high school, it was a punch card reader connected to a calculator, hanging chads' anyone?  If you didn't punch the card correctly and left any of those, it could sure mess up the results of your program, or it wouldn't run at all.  Using that stylus to punch holes in 30-50+ cards was just, oh, so much fun!  Wasn't it?

BTW: The name of my BBS was "Cematary BBS", might have been spelled "Cemetary" or "Cematery", yes I know Cemetery was misspelled, that was done on purpose  That was a LONG time back, mid to late 80's through the early to possible mid 90's, so I'm not exactly sure how I spelled it back then.  But it was one of those. LOL  And the SysOp's name I used was always M.T. Tombs.

And the longest distance call I ever received to my BBS was from somewhere down under, Australia. Chatted live with this guy for over 2 hours!

 

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1 hour ago, Orville said:

And when I took programming classes in high school, it was a punch card reader connected to a calculator, hanging chads' anyone?  If you didn't punch the card correctly and left any of those, it could sure mess up the results of your program, or it wouldn't run at all. 

When I was learning to program at the Computer Learning Center, (remember that?) we started on punch cards. ONE of the card machines had ONE character that didn't punch what you typed. It PRINTED what you typed so that it read right, but it didn't PUNCH the letter you typed. You had to find that out the hard way. You generally got one shot per day to run your program and the first time you used that machine it could take all day to figure out why your program didn't run the night before. You had to check every printed line and punch card against your hand written coding sheet. Once you got past the first couple of weeks, you could submit your sheets to the key punch operators and have them do it (again, lucky to get the card deck back the next day) but they were prone to typing errors too. 

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