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Water inside my Flood light


tomsusie
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I purchased two new 50w Flood lights this year and they worked great.  When I brought them inside recently I noticed one of them has water inside the light part.  I have no idea how the water got in or how to get it out again?  I took the frame off the front glass and it looks like it is well sealed all the way around.  I've tried tipping the light in different directions to hopefully get it to drip out but no luck.  Has anyone had this problem or suggestion as to how to get the water out?  It was working right up to the end but they were out for a few weeks after the holiday lighting season and we've had a very wet start of the year.  Somehow water got inside but I'm at a loss as to how to get the water out.  Any and all suggestions will be appreciated.  Thanks!  Tom

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Posted (edited)

so it caused no problems?  that's good to know.  DId it eventually just evaporate?  Thanks for your response.  I hadn't thought about it being condensation - but that would make sense.  Also explain how it got in there.

 

 

Edited by tomsusie
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1 hour ago, tomsusie said:

so it caused no problems?  that's good to know.  DId it eventually just evaporate?  Thanks for your response.  I hadn't thought about it being condensation - but that would make sense.  Also explain how it got in there.

 

 

Moisture trapped will lead to corrosion. IMHO  Allow it to stabilize temp  in a dry location (while your humidity is low 😛 ) , open it up and let it dry out, then seal .

(Opening up while cold will condense more moisture inside) A recharged silica pack in the back box may help KEEP it dry.

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so I should remove the glass so It will dry out and then reseal after it is dry.  Just regular silicone to reseal?  Thanks for your input.

 

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2 minutes ago, tomsusie said:

so I should remove the glass so It will dry out and then reseal after it is dry.  Just regular silicone to reseal?  Thanks for your input.

 

Check the seal material when you open it. if it is a dry O-ring, maybe a little silicon GREASE. Avoid gluing when possible. Maybe Form-a-gasket if the seal is torn or damaged. You want something removable.

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I found the same problem this year with my 50 watt floods. You need to open them up and get the water out. I found the water had oxidized the back reflector. I took fine steel wool and removed it. Made it like new. I just cleaned and reseated the rubber gasket to the glass. Make sure you check the seals where the connections attach to the body also, as water can also enter there.

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Mine looks like it is silicone that was applied (not as a ring or preform).  The water appears to be just in the front by the glass?  Can it get behind the light assembly?  I would rather not take that apart if I don't have to.  Appreciate everyone's suggestions.  I will get that done very soon so it can dry out.

 

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You could try using CLEAR Flex Seal liquid applied lightly{thinly} around the glass, it drys crustal clear, and shouldn't affect the light output or look of the light.

I use this stuff to seal a lot of things, C7 sockets where the end wire is exposed., where I may splice in an RGB builb and cover the clear or shrink tubing that matches the wire color.  I also use the black flex seal for some applications as well.   This stuff works really great for water-proofing and sealing any extra holes that may not be needed.

I usually find all the Flex Seal products at Ace Hardware.  This stuff us awesome and works extremely well in a wide variant of temperatures!

P.S. Forgot to mention, Flex Seal also has a Flex Seal Water-proof tape, clear, black and I think a couple other colors that could be used instead of the liquid.  Much neater and less messy than the liquids or pastes.  I haven't used the Flex Seal Tape as yet, but plan too when I run out of the liquid I have on hand.

 

Edited by Orville
Add the P.S. about Flex Seal Tape.
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On 3/9/2021 at 8:59 AM, Orville said:

You could try using CLEAR Flex Seal liquid applied lightly{thinly} around the glass, it drys crustal clear, and shouldn't affect the light output or look of the light.

I use this stuff to seal a lot of things, C7 sockets where the end wire is exposed., where I may splice in an RGB builb and cover the clear or shrink tubing that matches the wire color.  I also use the black flex seal for some applications as well.   This stuff works really great for water-proofing and sealing any extra holes that may not be needed.

I usually find all the Flex Seal products at Ace Hardware.  This stuff us awesome and works extremely well in a wide variant of temperatures!

P.S. Forgot to mention, Flex Seal also has a Flex Seal Water-proof tape, clear, black and I think a couple other colors that could be used instead of the liquid.  Much neater and less messy than the liquids or pastes.  I haven't used the Flex Seal Tape as yet, but plan too when I run out of the liquid I have on hand.

 

Thanks Orville.  I have not used Flex Seal but have seen many commercials for it on TV.  Always wondered if it worked as well as they make it look.  I will look into that.  

Thanks to everyone for your responses.  All are very helpful. Appreciate your time!

Tom

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On 3/11/2021 at 5:11 AM, tomsusie said:

Thanks Orville.  I have not used Flex Seal but have seen many commercials for it on TV.  Always wondered if it worked as well as they make it look.  I will look into that.  

Thanks to everyone for your responses.  All are very helpful. Appreciate your time!

Tom

The only Flex Seal I won't recomend is the paste type.  Once the paste can is opened and used, you can't seal it back up to keep it from hardening in the can.  I tried the paste and it's not worth the cost.  The liquid is a little messy, but you don't have the insets that come with the paste.  Opened mine and used very little on a project.  Tried doing what it stated to keep it pliable by putting in the insets and get the air out from between the paste, insets, and top of the can, followed the directions exactly, but when I opened the can 2 days later to use it, the whole can had hardened and it was useless. 

That's when I tried the Flex Seal Liquid, again, a little messy, takes a little longer to dry, but it doesn't dry out like the paste did in a sealed can!  And I had to toss the entire can of paste, so I'll never use the paste or recommend the Flex Seal Paste, but the liquid has worked for me for going on close to a year with no dry out issues in the can and has sealed and used to repair some things very well, including some shoes {mainly rubber flip flops}.  I want to try the tape because you can cut it down to size, and it's supposed to seal up just as good as the liquids and pastes, plus the tape wouldn't be messy.

I use large, medium or small paint brushes to apply the Flex Seal Liquid where I need it, or depending on what I'm sealing may just dip the item in the liquid in the can {like where a wire and heat shrink connections are made}.

If you do use the Flex Seal liquid, it forms a nice flexible water-proof rubber seal, and it's not that difficult in some areas to get it off using an X-Acto knife and a small pair of needle-nose pliars to pull it off if needed.

 

 

Edited by Orville
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Greetings 

just a quick note to Orville and others losing expensive materials after opening them up. Orville mentioned that Flex Seal Paste would set up after opening the container. If the material sets up because of oxygen or moisture then a bottle of Bloxygen (available on Amazon) will do the trick. It’s an inert gas that lays on top of the material stopping the material from chemically setting. Works great on oil base paints and many other expensive materials. Doesn’t work on latex paint’s. 

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23 hours ago, tomsusie said:

Thanks Orville for the additional information.  Very helpful!!  Have a great Friday!! 

 

You're welcome.  I'm going to be buying some Flex Tape for my 2021 Christmas Display.  I still have a few strands of LED and Incandescent lights I might use in my display this year and instead of using the hard plastic child proof caps on the ends of te light strands, going to use the Flex Tape {clear} cut down to size to cover any female end plugs on the strands as well as any open female ends on the pass through plugs. 

Will also try it on the extension cord and other cord connections by wrapping it as tightly around those connections and see how the Flex tape holds up in the rainy season this summer before committing to using it on the cords in my Christmas set up for 2021..  Will test it out with the cords lying on the ground to see if any GFCI issues occur. 

Hoping the Flex Tape Clear will allow me to leave the cords flat on the ground at their connection points without having to use stakes or other means to keep those connections off the ground.

Will let folks know how the Flex Seal Tape works out after I've conducted some tests with it.  If it does work as well as claimed, will sure help a lot of us out with those pesky cord connection issues, and even some other areas of a display that might need a little weather and water-proofing!

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10 hours ago, SeeFromSpace said:

Greetings 

just a quick note to Orville and others losing expensive materials after opening them up. Orville mentioned that Flex Seal Paste would set up after opening the container. If the material sets up because of oxygen or moisture then a bottle of Bloxygen (available on Amazon) will do the trick. It’s an inert gas that lays on top of the material stopping the material from chemically setting. Works great on oil base paints and many other expensive materials. Doesn’t work on latex paint’s. 

I really don't think that will work with the Flex Seal paste product, it dries to a flexible rubbery compound and it may be or have latex in the compound.  When dry it does feel a lot like it could be latex based,  But since I tossed it, can't say for certain on the paste.   The liquid seems to be quite different and doesn't dry out, so not sure what the difference between the two are, but the paste is a no go as far as I'm concerned.   Just not worth paying $15-$20 for a small 1 pint can of this stuff, just to have it harden ti a solid rubber brick in the can within a day or 2 after opening.

I'll stick with the liquid that stays useable, and I'm about to buy the Flex Seal Tapew to start experimenting with to see how well it will work under rainy, wet conditions and outside in the extreme Florida summer Sun {heat}, including some days in our winter season}.

But thanks for the suggestion, it's appreciated and I'll keep it in mind for other products I may use.

 

Edited by Orville
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