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Singing Pumpkin Help


martsycart
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I'm wanting to do a singing pumpkin (AC) for Halloween this year, and I was wondering what lights I would need to get started. A lot of the pumpkin templates I've found have a small number of lights for the eyes and mouth. How do I achieve such a small number when string lights come in higher counts? 

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18 minutes ago, martsycart said:

I'm wanting to do a singing pumpkin (AC) for Halloween this year, and I was wondering what lights I would need to get started. A lot of the pumpkin templates I've found have a small number of lights for the eyes and mouth. How do I achieve such a small number when string lights come in higher counts? 

Normally the faces have to go on a frame like a 2x4 frame. I always use led lights so cutting is not recommended, I will use the smallest string I can and whatever lights are left over I wind up and shove them inside a small black garbage bag then secure on the back of the 2x4 frame. They do make blackout light covers but the bag is just easier and quicker.

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If using incandescents, I have found the smallest strand are 10 or 20 bulbs, 10 bulbs each bulb is 12V, 20 bulbs each bulb is 6V {10 lights x 12V = 120V,  20 Lights x 6V = 120V.  You can find strands of 35, 70 and up.  

But if you're looking for these smaller stands, 10 or 20 bulb count {incandescent} and use standard AC Current, I have found mine many times at an Everything for $1.00 store.   I have gotten these in both Orange and Clear bulbs at Dollar Tree Stores.  I've never found other colors besides these 2.

If I need a specific color, I'd have to go to a hobby or craft store and get some "stained glass" type paint to paint the bulbs in a color I need.   This type of paint will allow the bulb to be painted with a translucent color, that is, the light will shine through the painted bulb.  These type paints work very well for painting clear bulbs to make them a color you need. 

And these "stained glass" paints come in all colors, purple, orange, blue, green, yellow, red, white and variations of those colors.  These paints may be a little costly, but they are the only ones that work best for coloring any type of clear incandescent bulb to any color you might need.

But the above reply using blackout caps or the black garbage bag method and hiding the "left over" bulbs is what most folks will use, cheaper than the "staine glass" paints.

All depends on "your preference" to how and what you want to do to achieve the final finished prop.

Edited by Orville
Correct spelling errors I missed.
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