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I am making two huge displays using coroplast. I have watched a couple of videos linked off of planetchristmas in which the poster used wood for his frames. I wasn't crazy about that idea, because of the condition of the wood over time, weight, etc... Just so you know when I say huge, I'm talking about the car I have drawn, 1937 Oldsmobile from A Christmas Story uses two sheets of Coro, so that's 4 ft tall and 16 foot long (Actually used another foot and a half of another sheet to finish the roof). The other display is Cousin Eddie's RV from Christmas Vacation. It uses a total of four sheets of Coro. So that's also 16 ft long,  but 8ft tall.

I have already used thinner to get the glaze off the coro,  primed it, and already drawn both vehicles. So before painting, I thought I should frame them so I can paint over and screws/ washers.

Who better to ask than you guys, do you have any better ideas for framing such a huge project? After all the work I am putting in to this, I seriously don't want the wind to destroy them.

 

IMG_3830.JPG

Edited by Roxxxtar
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8 hours ago, Roxxxtar said:

I am making two huge displays using coroplast. I have watched a couple of videos linked off of planetchristmas in which the poster used wood for his frames. I wasn't crazy about that idea, because of the condition of the wood over time, weight, etc... Just so you know when I say huge, I'm talking about the car I have drawn, 1937 Oldsmobile from A Christmas Story uses two sheets of Coro, so that's 4 ft tall and 16 foot long (Actually used another foot and a half of another sheet to finish the roof). The other display is Cousin Eddie's RV from Christmas Vacation. It uses a total of four sheets of Coro. So that's also 16 ft long,  but 8ft tall.

I have already used thinner to get the glaze off the coro,  primed it, and already drawn both vehicles. So before painting, I thought I should frame them so I can paint over and screws/ washers.

Who better to ask than you guys, do you have any better ideas for framing such a huge project? After all the work I am putting in to this, I seriously don't want the wind to destroy them.

 

IMG_3830.JPG

I personally use 2 x 2 to frame out my coro props or at least the 4mm variety, 10mm seems to be rigid enough to withstand most.

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That large of a sheet of coroplast is going to be a huge wind load.  A quick Google search found several windload calculators.  I would start by determining what the windload will be based on the highest wind speed that can be expected.  The wind load goes up at a squared function so it goes up very fast as the wind speed increases.

As for structure, for my 48x48 inch Holiday Coro singing faces, I used 3/4 inch aluminum U channel.  The Coro was attached to it with screws and 1.25 inch fender washers. I used the aluminum mainly for the weight savings.  I can’t tell you how well it will hold up in wind because the faces did not get mounted on the roof as planned because I was running really late.  That meant that the two faces just leaned up against the front of the house.  Next year will get them onto the roof.

Front_of_House_2018-12-03.jpg

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Try 1 inch aluminum angle , strong easy to work with and light. you could make all  the sections  and then bolt them together, take apart for storage.

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I use 2x4’s or 2x6 on my larger ones. My two snowman are over 6’tall.

I also use emt conduit to prop them up. Last season we had some 80mph winds and one snowman turned a little but did not fall over.

AL will cost use good $ and not add weight.

Best of luck

JR

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I totally agree about the wind load. 

Cut many  vent flaps (so the hinge is in a coro groove) which can easily  to unload the force . Look at those big banners strung across spans to see what I am suggesting

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/21/2019 at 6:19 PM, TheDucks said:

I totally agree about the wind load. 

Cut many  vent flaps (so the hinge is in a coro groove) which can easily  to unload the force . Look at those big banners strung across spans to see what I am suggesting

Thanks for the responses everyone. Would you mind elaborating on the “vent flaps” for a simple minded person like myself? lol 

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14 hours ago, Roxxxtar said:

Thanks for the responses everyone. Would you mind elaborating on the “vent flaps” for a simple minded person like myself? lol 

Think upside down, old fashioned key hole, CUT on outlines only, about 3" for the hole part. The top of the slot part (~1", is the "hinge" (not cut, the reason for being inline with the coro grooves:flexibility)

What was interesting, when I googled for a picture, the first banner company recommended AGAINST: Weakens the banner (not that it did not reduce load. But they did point out, it was a small % reduction of the total when they were included)

So maybe just stronger braces? Deeper anchors?

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