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Controller provide network power?


butlerlj
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I have two CTB16PC gen3 controllers. During a troubleshooting process I noticed with AC power to controller 2 only, and a network cable connected between controller 1&2 that I have accessory  power on controller 1.  I do not have AC power to controller 1 nor do I have a network cable from pc to controllers connected. Naturally when I disconnect network cable  from between 1&2 I no longer have accessory power on controller 1. Now everything works fine but it seems to me when I connect power back to controller 1 that the two accessory powers from controller 1&2 would be bucking one and other. I tried to search info on network data/power but didn't find anything.

Larry

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1 hour ago, butlerlj said:

I have two CTB16PC gen3 controllers. During a troubleshooting process I noticed with AC power to controller 2 only, and a network cable connected between controller 1&2 that I have accessory  power on controller 1.  I do not have AC power to controller 1 nor do I have a network cable from pc to controllers connected. Naturally when I disconnect network cable  from between 1&2 I no longer have accessory power on controller 1. Now everything works fine but it seems to me when I connect power back to controller 1 that the two accessory powers from controller 1&2 would be bucking one and other. I tried to search info on network data/power but didn't find anything.

Larry

Bucking, requires  difference. When both are properly powered, they simply PARALLEL . 2 @ 9V batteries with the +'s together and the -'s together. I expect wire resistance will balance minor voltage variations.

IIRC some newer controllers have a jumper that can be removed to prevent Accessory power transfer (common usage ELL power)

 

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I am certainly going ahead and run it this way. I just thought someone with knowledge of LOR network protocol would explain what is going on. ie. what pins carry data, voltage or sync pulse or whatever.

thanks, Larry

Edited by butlerlj
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2 hours ago, butlerlj said:

I just thought someone with knowledge of LOR network protocol would explain what is going on. ie. what pins carry data, voltage or sync pulse or whatever.

Doing this by memory, but I think I have this right.  Data is on pins 4 & 5 (known correct).  Power is on pins 3 & 6 (I don't remember which is + and which is -).  This is normally used for powering ELLs or Directors.  Pins 1 & 2 pass through from one RJ45 to the other without any other connections.  I recall that 7 & 8 are not connected. 

The pins 1 & 2 pass through can be used for an alarm circuit.  For example, on the last controller, put a jumper between pins 1 & 2 on the otherwise unused RJ45 jack.  Split out pins 1 & 2 at the computer end of the network and hook an alarm detection that is looking for that short at the far end.  If someone disconnects a controller, the alarm detects the loss of continuity and does whatever you want it to do - turn on lights, sound an alarm, trigger a shotgun (just kidding on that last one).

 

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