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I didnt get a chance to defend my comments before the original thread got locked.

 

Maybe and just maybe for the slow speed that LOR uses and that includes there higher speed net that they now have. Trying to patch a Cat what ever cable with solder joint is going to change the impedance of the cable. This will degrade the signal to the point it will not be received properly to be decoded.

 

As for my comment about using EZ connectors, the ones where you do not trim the length till afterwards (wire comes out end of connector). Well I suppose I learned how to do it before these connectors came out. And frankly I still use the older style. And have learned how to use the Cat6 connector with the "Bridge". Ya, so tongue in cheek was those that will take a short cut.

 

Know it all? No I dont know it all. But compared to a good number of you who have never soldered, know nothing about impedance, transmitters, Ohm's Law, Watt's Law, and a good number of other electrical electronics. Ya I am a fricken genius.

 

Grow some hide folks

 

Maybe I say something that you do not understand why. And maybe I dont do a real good job of going into every detail. And maybe some of you need to read and learn more to do this hobby .

 

Peace

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Well, I've soldered a cat 5 cable that was 75 + feet and had no issues.  Unless you're using crappy solder, I don't think you'd have any degradation at all.  Maybe I bought magic solder?   ;)  You need to chill dude...  Where's you're display, btw, it looks like we live fairly close to each other...

Edited by marsh28
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Well, I've soldered a cat 5 cable that was 75 + feet and had no issues.  Unless you're using crappy solder, I don't think you'd have any degradation at all.  Maybe I bought magic solder?   ;)  You need to chill dude...  Where's you're display, btw, it looks like we live fairly close to each other...

I have done the same and I am still using it after 5 years.

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According to Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category_5_cable.

 

I wouldn't think cutting and soldering it back together would do it any good as far as reliability goes.  It would never meet the cat 5 standards after doing this.

 

I'm guessing we may get away with it for our purposes here.   If I wanted a shorter cable, I would learn to make my own, or buy one that is too long, cut it off and add a new RJ45 plug.

 

Jerry

 

Sorry, can't get the link to Wikipedia to work...  

Edited by LORisAwesome
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I've gotta say, this is one of those waste-of-time threads about something not more than one person in a thousand will ever even attempt to do. Not to mention how many times someone that inexperienced would try before giving up in total frustration.

I've done a lot of dumb and unnecessary things in my life (like even responding to this thread) but trying to cut and solder cat5 sure isn't one of those things. Setting aside the obvious challenge of soldering wires not much thicker than a human hair, this seems like a stupifying amount of work for nothing. Assuming that one tins the ends of the wires to be soldered (and God help anyone who doesn't know to do that) we're talking about 16 acts of stripping wires, 16 acts of tinning ends, 8 acts of actual soldering. Then, add to that however you choose to seal those 8 solder connections, not to mention how many you have to do over because one of the eight fragile wires broke.

If y'all have that much extra time, how about improving your sequencing instead? Or something else that will have a direct effect on your display?

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