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Radio Station Frequency


colelini00

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Hello everyone, I was curious if anyone has ever had any trouble broadcasting their music on a station below 88.0. I know most household radios can pick up stations lower than 88 and this is what I had planned on using since it is basically nothing but dead air. However, I'm worried about car radios being able to go this low. 

 

Any advice or thoughts are welcome. 

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I've used 87.9 for the past 7 years, never had a problem. One year someone in another neighborhood started broadcasting on that channel and stopped 2 days later, but that's been it.

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We're using 87.9 with no issues - it sounds clear as a bell within a block of my house in either direction, and then begins to get staticky. 

 

I checked the FCC website and no one has a license for that station within 10 miles.

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Beware, however, the radio-locator website is wrong as often as it's correct. Personally, I wouldn't even use it and I CERTAINLY wouldn't act on ANYTHING based soley on the results the site returns. Stick with the FCC website and verify what you find there by actually sitting in your vehicle during the evening and checking for available frequencies.

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I also like to tell people to stick their station midway between 2 stations that are powerful.  For example, if you have powerful stations at 101.5 and 102.5 and nothing between the two, use 101.9 or 102.1.  Sitting the in the middle of 2 powerful stations can mean a lot less hassle should something go wrong.  

 

First off, those 2 stations are going to bleed a bit onto either side giving you some FCC interference cover - no one is going to claim they are listening to some distant station at 101.9 when 101.5 or 102.5 are bleeding a bit to either side.  

 

Second, should your transmitter get a little wonky those two stations will just completely stomp all over you.  Cheap FM transmitters have a problem with 'frequency drift', and that drift becomes worse as temperatures change to extremes.  If your few little milliwatt transmitter goes off frequency and drifts up or down to 101.5/102.5 their 50K watt broadcasts will simply jam your signal out of existence.  That keeps you safe from the men in black.

 

The secret is finding 2 powerful stations with just enough of a gap to get between.  If you had stations at 101.7 and 102.1, you probably won't have any success at 101.9.  Sure you are between the 2, but again their bleed is going to stomp on you.  If you have stations at 101.5 and 103.5 and what appears to be nothing between, you probably want to stay out of 101.7-103.3.  You may find out that someone nearby has a very powerful antenna and likes to listen to 102.1 that happens to be broadcasting from 150 miles away.  You can't hear it, but they can.  If you start blasting WiW all over them, it does NOT matter if that station is 'out of market', the FCC can tell you to shut it down.  Commercial stations ALWAYS have priority over you - even ones a thousand miles away.  

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Thanks for the feedback everyone! Taking all of this into consideration I think I have made a good choice for my station this year. 

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