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Can i set my LOR show up in snow?


XYrZbest
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there is probably about 1/2 in of snow on the ground, not too bad, but I want to setup my light show. one of my friends said that the extension cords will freeze if they get cold, is this true? can i set my show up in the snow? there is very little...

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Yes, yes you can. The electrons will still flow freely through a cold extension cord. ;)

+1 on electrons not freezing. Funny stuff.

Just try to elevate plug connections above the snow wherever possible. Your GFCI receptacles will appreciate it.

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+1 on electrons not freezing. Funny stuff.

Just try to elevate plug connections above the snow wherever possible. Your GFCI receptacles will appreciate it.

 

 

Yes, yes you can. The electrons will still flow freely through a cold extension cord. ;)

awesome I think my friend said that the cables get stiff, anyone know if that is true?

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As Jeff mentioned the cords will stiffen up, so do cat cables. If you are using Ethernet cables(like I do),the vinyl cover will crack open after one season. I make new ones when I need to since I don't use plenum cable, too expensive.

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Yeah everything is just a bit stiffer. When hanging your lights if they are incans. Plug them in and let them warm up just a bit and hang them. They are a bit easier to work with that way. We had success with that hanging lights at a friends house last weekend in the cold.

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If your using solid core cat5 cable, it does NOT bend well when its cold.   Stranded is better for cold where the cables may bend.

 

I usually leave my roof lights on all day to melt any snow around them (assuming its not lake effect snow).  Have had no 'cold weather' issues though.

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I have been running my show for years in deep snow and very cold temps in Northern Alberta. CCRs, CCBS, and 1/2 dozen pro and residential controllers with75k lights. Runs great, handling the lights and cords needs to be managed slowly and one at a time taken from a heated house or garage. It can be done just be very patient. This past weekend we got another foot of snow and temps dropped down to -34c. Show worked fine. Recommend buying a gas leaf blower to keep your decorations clear of snow. Have fun.

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there is probably about 1/2 in of snow on the ground, not too bad, but I want to setup my light show. one of my friends said that the extension cords will freeze if they get cold, is this true? can i set my show up in the snow? there is very little...

Sure that's why it's so dark  at the south pole, electricity is all frozen!   Brrrrrrr

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  • 8 months later...

This will be my first year doing LOR. I've had static displays consisting of 100,000 lights for upwards of 25 years. I've spent the last several years switching over to LED lights. I searched this particular thread because I get 15-20 feet (yes I said FEET) of snow every year and temperatures as cold as -50f. My concern was more about the electronics in the control box, not the flow of electricity. Should I put my controllers inside a heated building or will the be fine outside? I'm starting small (I bought 3 controllers during the summer sale). I realize this is an addictive hobby but I'm having a hard time thinking of ways to use all 48 channels. I won't have any spiral trees due the common 100mph winds. There are no RGB's in my future since I had to make a deal with the devil (wife) that our display will remain all white even when set to music. Anyhow if anyone has any suggestions or comments in regard to snow, cold, and wind or just general tips for a first timer I would appreciate it.

Thanks, Zvacman

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We specify industrial components, so our controllers are usually good down to -40.  They may continue to work at -50, but it is going to be a dice roll.

 

If you are talking that many feet of snow, you need to ensure the controllers won't be buried.  What can happen is the controller gets completely covered by snow.  When running they produce some heat which may be enough to melt the snow surrounding the controller - snow is actually a pretty good insulator so this can happen even in sub 0 temps.

 

Once the snow starts to melt, the water has no where to go but inside the enclosure.  Not good.

 

Normally we tell people to get the controller as close to where it is needed to save money in extension cords.  For you however, I think a heated building that can also offer snow protection is best.

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How do you see the lights to know they are working properly when they are under 20 feet of snow? I thought it was bad that I didn't put anything on roof because we could get possibly 2 feet of snow.

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