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FM Transmitter (Lower Signal)


mpha9c
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I purchased a FM Transmitter that transmits way beyond FCC Guidelines. Would a (Inline Attenuator Pad) bring the signal down to where it needs to be for transmitting? Trying to wrap up the last bit of things I need to get everything wrapped up for my display.. Any thoughts on this would be great.

 

Thanks everyone.

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This one is a little more money, but is the one I used on my FM Transmitter for just under a year: http://www.mpja.com/10db-Feed-Through-Attennuator-Terminator/productinfo/16547%20TE

 

After a bit of use on the transmitter and transmitter electronic component burn in, they usually even out and don't broadcast as far as when brand new.

 

Mine was transmitting 5+ mile radius when I first got it, I would take the attenuator off after every 3 months of use and check how far the signal was getting, after 6 months, my transmitter "stabilized"  and now doesn't broadcast as far, still broadcasts a wee bit over the limit, but not like it was doing when new.

 

Depending on how your antenna connects to your transmitter, mine uses coax connections, will depend on what style attenuator you need to get.

 

The attenuator goes between the antenna output and the FM antenna itself.

 

And yes, I'd highly recommend using one, and check about every 3 months {remove attenuator} to see if the signal has stabilized to just at or slightly over the limit.   Mine transmits about 1-2 houses on either side of me and across the street, which should be okay.

 

As long as it doesn't interfere with any other radio stations, you should be good to go.   I try and keep mine at least 5 point steps clear from active channels, that is, I use 99.7, so as long as their are no active frequencies from 99.2 to 100.5, and I'm as close to the middle of those freq's, I'm good as I won't be interfering with any local stations.  

 

Although distant stations that may use the freq. and able to come in clear at times, may pose an issue.    Although I am over 150 miles away from a station that uses 99.7, sometimes it does come in, although usually static or transmission is broken and not really all that clear, you should be fine.    Been using the same freq.now for 3 years and haven't had any issues. 

 

This is just my experience with the transmitter I use, others may have differing experiences.   I do believe it all depends on the make and model of the transmitter and your antenna setup.

Edited by Orville
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  • 2 weeks later...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003FO4UHW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Orville what connection is the antenna on this FM Transmitter. This is what I purchased and I bought some Attenuator pads and there not this connection the normal cable coax. What would you recommend?

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The type of connector on that fm transmitter is TNC. Similar to BNC but it is threaded. If you bought one of the attenuators that were on the bottom of that amazon page they are f-type. You could buy an adapter to go from TNC to f-type then a second adapter to go from f-type back to TNC or just buy a TNC attenuator. I believe for every 3db of attenuation you cut your output in half.

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Here is another problem, unless I missed it in the description. These attenuators have a max power in. I did not see if you can only use it up to .01 or 100 watts. If you push to much power into it, you'll burn it up and the bad swr might burn up the output transistor.

 

A word from the wise. ASK first then order. Or you can pay again to get what you actually need.

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