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Rgb vs CCR market research


bobschm
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I was just calculating. If LOR could get the price of CCR pixels below $200, it would be worth buying those instead of the DIY headaches of the Ray Wu method. We're talking about the selection, soldering, troubleshooting, and programming headaches costing time and money.

If the price point came a bit lower, I would bite. I suspect others would too. A "buy 3, get one free" sale would probably sell more than they could manufacture.

I'm just saying. Anyone else?

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I ran the numbers once.  For a 16 ribbon tree:

 

Ray Wu:  $1,100.00 for a total of 2,400 pixels (7,200 dmx channels)

$600 for the 16 5 meter ribbon w/ 150 pixels each including shipping

$300 for 6 100 watt power supplies including shipping

$200 for 2 sandevices E6804 including shipping

 

LOR:  $4,000.00 for a total of 800 pixels (2,400 dmx channels)

16 CCR with power supply and controller w/ 150 pixels each of which you can only create 50 pixels per strip.  I assume it includes shipping.

 

Hmmmmmm.

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That's what I mean. At current pricing there's no comparison. And the more you need the worse the pricing looks.

But don't forget you need to order extra from Ray since you might not be able to get exact replacements later if anything fails. And if it fails during the holidays, you won't be getting it in the next few days.

So I guess the question is, what price is the convenience and time saving of the LOR products worth? What price would it take for you to buy?

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You have to know when to hold them and when to fold them.  We are in the DIY hobby space.  LOR is in the free market business space.  They have to determine where their break-even point is and what the magic price point is to get enough buyers in order to make the break-even point and reach their financial goals.  I don't think I'll show my hand just yet.  The action is on LOR.  Let's be patient.

Edited by Alien407
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I'm with Bob.  I definitely like the fact that LOR's pixel offerings are as close to plug-n-play as anything in the business, and I recognize that there's always a price to pay to support excellent customer service.  But LOR's pricing is a show-stopper for me to get from where I am to where I'd like to be regarding RGB using only their products.  Every year the lure of DIY grows stronger and stronger, and with me transitioning into semi-retirement, my increasing amount of available time makes the plug-n-play argument weaker and weaker each time I revisit it.

 

In some regards, I find LOR's pricing reminiscent of many hearing aid dispensers who post outrageous "regular" pricing and then come down from those prices via a myriad of discounts and specials just like a Mexican flea market.  When's the last time Ray Wu had a "sale"?  Doesn't seem like he needs one.  I've always said that if retailers can survive selling items at "sale" prices, then they should be able to survive selling those same items at those same prices every single day, so why not cut the crap and make it easier on everyone?  (And I don't just talk the talk, I walk the walk every day in my hearing aid dispensing office.)

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If you went with pre-sale pricing and products, you could create a 12 strip (or even 16 strip) pixel tree with an e682 controller (or two), power supplies, and materials for $1000 or less.  It's definitely not plug n' play but its going to produce comparable, very similar effects in my opinion.  Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love LOR and the LOR controllers I have, I think it's a great product and it's worked awesome for me.  I guess there's a price to pay for that, but when does it become too much?  I'm learning more and more everyday and finding new products and ways to create some of the same effects which is making it hard for me to hang onto LOR equipment.  If I sold it off I could buy 4x's the channels with other products.  Arrggh, so tough because I want to hold my allegiance to LOR but I'm torn...

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For me the support is worth the price..

I am not much of a DIY ( have a renard something that has never been taken out of the box and a controller that need to be solder just gathering dust).

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The game will really change when a company like Holiday Coro starts selling 50 meter strips with soldered connectors and a small, E1.31 controller for 100 bucks.

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For me the support is worth the price..

I am not much of a DIY ( have a renard something that has never been taken out of the box and a controller that need to be solder just gathering dust).

I should buy that PC controller from you that needs to be soldered . That way I can see if I can do it on my own.  I only need the card. You can keep the enclosure & the wires. If I can solder that card then I might get more confident in going beyond that.  Sometimes I wish I would have kept two controllers that I sold to you. Now I know someone who wants me to help them out in Leduc via (plug & play). Now I can only let them borrow one 16 channel controller & the mini director unit & supple them with an SD card & sequences. If I had another controller or two then they could have a 32 channel setup with a spare controller just in case.

Edited by lightzilla
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If I sold it off I could buy 4x's the channels with other products.  Arrggh, so tough because I want to hold my allegiance to LOR but I'm torn...

Well that fellow on the PC forum sold his 6 Lor controllers very fast & went the D.I.Y. way in rgb. I said that to say I know a fellow right now who would buy a few of them if the price is fair. You could sale your Lor stuff fairly easy I would think.

 

I agree with George here....

 

"m with Bob.  I definitely like the fact that LOR's pixel offerings are as close to plug-n-play as anything in the business, and I recognize that there's always a price to pay to support excellent customer service.  But LOR's pricing is a show-stopper for me to get from where I am to where I'd like to be regarding RGB using only their products.  Every year the lure of DIY grows stronger and stronger, and with me transitioning into semi-retirement, my increasing amount of available time makes the plug-n-play argument weaker and weaker each time I revisit it."

Edited by lightzilla
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I keep hoping LOR will switch to a volume business model.

 

Reminds me of the guy selling apples for $100,000 each. When someone pointed out that he would not sell many apples that way, he replied, "But I only have to sell one!" :rolleyes:

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In what seems a lifetime ago I managed a waterbed store.  (Actually it was the early 1980's.)  New owners took over one day and immediately changed the prices and set them sky high.  Their position was if we were good enough sales people we'd be able to GET those prices from customers.  About that same time a competitor opened a similar store, almost literally right across the street.  They sold many of the exact same products - same brands, same models - but at approximately half the price that ours were marked.  (Which was very close to where our prices had been before the new owners took over.)

 

We had people shop us due to the store name, reputation, and the fact that the store had been there for years.  We explained everything to them about the merchandise, and answered their questions.  And sold next to nothing - even to repeat customers.  We watched out the window as our potential customers left our store and went directly to the competitor and purchased from them.  One by one, my sales staff left.  (Most went across the street.)  Our store, along with the new owners, lasted for four months.  The competitor, who was at the cutting edge of the industry at the time, is still there.

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IMHO, LOR should understand that they have two (2) distinct products.  One is hardware and one is software.  If they make sure their hardware is of high quality, with high functionality and set their prices competitive, they can sell a lot of product.  If they make sure their software is comprehensive, intuitive, robust, easy to use, price competitive AND HARDWARE AGNOSTIC, they can sell a ton of product.  I know they offer design services, but that's another business to talk about.

 

Just thinking out loud.

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Well that fellow on the PC forum sold his 6 Lor controllers very fast & went the D.I.Y. way in rgb. I said that to say I know a fellow right now who would buy a few of them if the price is fair. You could sale your Lor stuff fairly easy I would think.

 

 

The guy that sold his controllers that cheap was STUPID ...the price wasn't only fair......... it was ridiculous ............i can say that cuz that guy was me  (I certainly didn't do my homework before listing them)

now I'm biting my nails hoping I can buy fast enough on LOR's spring sale to make up some of the the difference for not planning. 

 

I think LOR will continue to do well even with there currency pricing structure because in this world there are  Walmart people who take what they  get and then there are Macy's people who only want the best and service and are willing to pay for it.   

Edited by gmac
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