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Power Out Transfer Switch?


therosses5
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Okay, so what if I'm short one or two channels from creating the 'perfect' show because I want to use something in one or two sequences and I've used up all my channels already and I'm too poor and it's getting late in the season to purchase another controller?

 

Is there a device that would allow me to send a power pulse of some kind (clap on - clap off, LOL) to it on a channel that would cause a switch to the output of a 2nd receptacle plugged into a set of lights?

 

I'm looking for a poor man's way of adding 1 or 2 channels temporarily without having to purchase a whole controller.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

you could do a "sum" (and gate) type switch, with a bunch of rectifiers and some cheap relays, but all said and done, you would most likley be at over 1/2 the cost of an additional LOR board. save your money and do the extra board next year....

 

Greg

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See if you can combine some of the similar looking channels and use what you freed up.

 

If LOR designed their AC controllers differently, you could get twice the number of channels from a controller using commercial technique called "dimmer doubling".

I've used this to control two stage lights differently from each other using only one dimmer channel.

Sends the top of the waveform to one light and the bottom to another.

And requires a lower voltage bulb or light string.

 

Since it's not available, it's not an option. Just thought I'd bring it up.

Edited by Ken Benedict
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Dimmer Doubling?  Never heard of that one.  Interesting..

 

Technically I understand it from how you discribed it, but the lower voltage bulb requirement, is that much of an issue for stage lighting?  Are they readily availible? 

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Since each light only sees one half of the sine wave, it's a lower voltage to light the filaments with.

 

Hence, they have 77 volt bulbs to use for dimmer doubling. Works pretty good; no flicker and same brightness.

And only one power circuit used.

 

At the end, it's just two power diodes; one pointing to the first light and the other pointing to the second light. Waveform looks funky.

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