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Has anyone tried these RGB Floods?


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I see what appears to be fair deals on these RGB Floodlights in 50W, 80W, 100W, 200W and 400W configurations.   IP65 rated.

 

I tried to call the US vendor, but couldn't understand much of what she said due to an accent.  I tried to get a rough equivalent of the LED wattage to an incandescent bulb so I could spec it out right.  Critical in all this is ensuring if these are E1.31/DMX compatible, but didn't quite get the answers either way.  

 

I know a 100W incandescent puts out about 1750 Lumens and a 75W incandescent bulb puts out between 600-1100 Lumens, but CFL bulbs put out the same amount of light with about 35W.  I'm very unclear on how many lumens would come from an RGB led flood like this one.   One popular LED site for home can down lighting says their 12W White LED bulb replaces a 65W incandescent.  If that's true and the specs stay constant, would I be in the ballpark with planning 50W flood to cover the equivalent light from a 150W incandescent? 

 

 

Just wondering if anyone else has experience with these in a wall wash configuration.  

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10W-20W-50W-100W-200W-400W-LED-Floodlight-Security-Flood-Light-/171069046009?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&var=&hash=item27d4827cf9

 

 

 

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I have pondered the same question concerning the RGB floods.  Inspite of all the posts on the subject, the best way I found was to just purchase one of the 10W 120v versions (these can be converted to 12v very easily).  Everyone's needs will be slightly different so just get one and test it.

 

Here is a link to one of the better comparisons between the 10W and 30w floods, although not the same unit as what you noted previously

 

http://forums.planetchristmas.com/index.php?/topic/53311-got-rgb-led-dmx-floods-now-available-for-pre-order/

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Thanks guys.   I tried the DIY route using 10pc of RGB rectangles in a cheap hallogen light casing I gutted. I built a prototype easy enough, but the low light didnt excite me.    There certainly must be a big quality difference given that you're both guiding me away in the same direction.      

 

These two models appear to be very close in specification and appear much more effective than my prototype.   The video on the first model was incredible.   It makes me wonder if I should mothball my crappy 12v low voltage landscaping lighting year round.  

 

 Your recommendations are good enough for me.  I'll get some on order today, and report back.        Thanks-Guys! 

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I bought some of these last year and they didnt have plugs...also they were bright,but the default setting was constant changing....I ended up giving them to my mom who liked the constant flashing.....there made pretty decent but it would be brighter and better quality if you build them yourselves.

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I bought some of these last year and they didnt have plugs...also they were bright,but the default setting was constant changing....I ended up giving them to my mom who liked the constant flashing.....there made pretty decent but it would be brighter and better quality if you build them yourselves.

 

Here is a link to hacking LED floods.

http://forums.lightorama.com/index.php?/topic/26405-10w-rgb-flood-light-reverse-engineering/#entry248815

 

You bypass the circuitry inside to use with any controller and go 12V. Very easy to do with any wattage type LED. These are much easier since the waterproof housing is included.

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Nice.    I cant believe the amount of information that's out here in the forums.  What a great bunch of folks. 

 

Thank-you. 

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We get the "how bright is it" and "will it work on my house" question quite a bit and the problem is, that it's a very hard question to answer because it can't be boiled down to even just an issue of lumens.  There are a large number of factors as to the angle, number and design that come into play.  Here is the answer from our flood FAQ page:


 

Q:  How many flood lights will I need to light up my house / garage / fence / porch / other?

 

  • A:  There are a number of factors that affect the number of floods required for your display.  Due to the number of different situations and factors, we would recommend reviewing the following information and then watching some of the Customer Videos (tab on this page) to determine the number of floods that will be right for your display.  If you are not sure, start with one and perform testing aginst your specific structure.
    • Reflectivity of surface - If you are reflecting the light off of a surface (as opposed to directly pointing them at your audience as "blinders"), this will have the greatest affect on the floods usability and output.  Examples of surfaces that reflect poorly are - dark brick, dark painted surfaces, roofing, trees, dark stucco or any other dark surface.  When illuminating a dark surface, additional flood lights will be required.  Consider placing your floods in front of windows with white blinds or against props or structures that are lighter in color

    • Height and width of area - These floods output at an angle of about 120 degrees, as such, the area they will cover varies depending on the distance from the area being lit.  So, placing them 10ft away from a wall will cover a larger area but at a lower level of light compared to a flood only 5ft away from a wall.  If this area is highly reflective (white), this may not be an issue but if the area is dark, you may need to move the flood in closer and add additional floods for full coverage.  Also consider where you are placing the flood - if you are attempting to illuminate the underside of a second story soffit, you would be better to place the floods in an elevated position closer to the second story, such as on a lower roof.

      Structure / house design - it is always easiest to illuminate a smooth, flat surface.  Given that most houses have elements that prevent this, such as columns, curves, porches, windows, protrusions and other design elements that break up the dispersion of light, often more than one or many floods are required to archive a smooth and even coverage over the entire area being illuminated.  As a side benefit of using a number of floods is that you can now control each one individually, allowing more complex sweeps or chases over the face of the structure.

 


Q:  Should I use a "High Output" flood or a lower level output flood?

A:  There are a number of factors that determine if would be better to use a High Output flood or a simpler, lower level output flood:

  • High output lights usually cost about $100-350+ per flood due to their need to more complex housings due to heat dissipation issues (higher output LED based floods are less efficient.
  • The more floods you have, the more sequencing options you have.  If you have 4, 6 or 8 floods over the face of a house, you can easily chase or "roll" colors over the face of the house.  When you have one or two high powered floods, the effect is greatly diminished.
  • High output lights are great where you need a huge amount of light in a focused area, such as up lighting a tree.  Where this can be an issue is when they are used on houses or other large objects.  When you light up a house, you want smooth even color over the entire face of the house.  Since most houses are not completely flat, that means that you'll have columns, gables, soffits, porches, etc that need lighting directly on them to ensure that there are no dead spots or shadows.  This is accomplished just like the theater does it - with a range of overlapping lights.  That then means you need lots of them, say, 4-10 floods, not just one or two.  To test this on your home, get a large flash light and stand in your yard where you want to place the flood light(s).  Then look for how well the coverage is, how far back you need to be to get the area of coverage and if there are dead spots.
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