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Amps question for water pumps


myextremelife
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Hey 2012 was my first light show in good old florida, im 19 and having some trouble..

 

Can someone who is really good with the LOR system or amps tell me how many of these

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/lawn-garden/pumps/14-horsepower-clear-water-pump-with-float-switch-68486.html

 

can safely go onto a standered LOR 16 channel?

 

the electrically status our 120V~ / 60Hz / 2.3 A

 

since its 2.3 amps and channels 1-8 can handle 15 amps, does that mean i can put around 5 on channel 1-8? without a problem?

 

Sorry if this is confusing. :unsure:

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I wouldn't use that one at all, check the reviews.  No one had success with that pump.  I know its cheap, but its cheap.  Go for something quality, and you might be happier and get a better longevity.

 

I agree.

 

Check here: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_water-pumps+submersible-utility-pumps

 

There is also "inductive kickback" you get when switching motors and solenoids on and off.

Relays are generally OK.

 

But you might want to insert a Solid State Relay inline with whatever pump you get, just to protect the LOR controller.

Make sure it's the A/C in and A/C out model.

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I agree.

 

Check here: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_water-pumps+submersible-utility-pumps

 

There is also "inductive kickback" you get when switching motors and solenoids on and off.

Relays are generally OK.

 

But you might want to insert a Solid State Relay inline with whatever pump you get, just to protect the LOR controller.

Make sure it's the A/C in and A/C out model.

So just have the pump line going into the input & the output plug into the LOR?

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One of the output channels from the LOR AC controller would go to the relay input.

 

The output of the relay would be connected IN SERIES with the pump and another AC power plug.

 

If this is confusing, best check with an electrician to avoid wiring problems.

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So just have the pump line going into the input & the output plug into the LOR?

Two key words here are "Solenoid" and "Contacts".

 

Basically, the LOR controller will control the relay "solenoid" to open and close the relay "contacts". Then a seperate power supply which is constantly on will be connected to the input "contacts" of the relay. The output set of "contacts" will go to the pump. When the LOR controller activates (supplies power to) the relay "solenoid", the relay "contacts" close which completes the circuit to the pump thereby suppling the power from the seperate constant power supply.

 

The reason for using a relay is because energizing the solenoid takes a lot less power to close the contacts versus water pumps. Usually the pumps are higher in amperage draw and many times are too much for what the LOR controller is designed for.

 

As stated previously, if your not sure, ask someone with knowledge on these, especially dealing with electricity.

 

Hope this helps.

Edited by Santas Helper
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Out of curiosity, are you flowing water for a few minutes then off for a few minutes, or trying to choreograph a dancing water show?

 

If it's a dancing water show, you could use a constant pump with a surge tank, and smaller valves for the individual jets.

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Then you might go with a good quality water pump followed by a one gallon surge tank then a four-way manifold that has lines going to electric valves where you want the water jets to appear.

 

Sample of an electric water valve: http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-4-Pneumatic-Plastic-Electric-Air-Water-Solenoid-Valve-Normally-Closed-110V-AC-/121070522593?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c305d90e1

 

These small valves can be driven directly by a LOR AC controller without much problem.

 

If you have a plumber friend or local folks at your hardware store, they can probably help you with the plumbing part.

 

I'm assuming that because you picked a submersible pump that you would recirculate the water in your display.

 

There's people who have done this on Youtube; search away and pick their brains and keep us posted.

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The surge tank should keep enough pressure for the water jets, but the pump may need a pressure switch.

 

This assumes the pump is capable of 20-40 psi. And that pressure would be good enough for your water jet display.

 

Look what you're learning about plumbing. There's a video somewhere about how the water jets work at the Bellagio in Las Vegas.

 

Here's a short one on

. I've seen an hour long special on cable TV somewhere. Edited by Ken Benedict
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  • 1 month later...

So what is a good cheap but safe and reliable relay to use with LOR? I have about 40 strands of C9's and quite a few spotlights that I'd like to put on a relay instead of using up all my channels due to amp draw. I'm searching the forums but its very time consuming so any guidance is appreciated. I'll eventually switch to retrofit LEDs, but after buying 3 controllers this year it's not in the budget

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Then you might go with a good quality water pump followed by a one gallon surge tank then a four-way manifold that has lines going to electric valves where you want the water jets to appear.

 

Sample of an electric water valve: http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-4-Pneumatic-Plastic-Electric-Air-Water-Solenoid-Valve-Normally-Closed-110V-AC-/121070522593?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item1c305d90e1

 

These small valves can be driven directly by a LOR AC controller without much problem.

 

If you have a plumber friend or local folks at your hardware store, they can probably help you with the plumbing part.

 

I'm assuming that because you picked a submersible pump that you would recirculate the water in your display.

 

There's people who have done this on Youtube; search away and pick their brains and keep us posted.

I have electric selenoids just like this one on my Air ride suspension on my truck. I ran them about 145psi (with air) no problem. The reaction time was instant. Should be able to work with water too and just have a pressure switch to keep the pressure from getting to great with the pump running constantly. Or if you have an extra channel/timer have the pump come on x amount of time before to build up pressure.

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