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Vampire Butt Connectors


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FYI.....

I don't mean to be a wet blanket here, but beware of those automotive T-Taps. Those are going to work great if you are talking about low voltage stuff (DC LEDs). HOWEVER, if you are using them for normal outlet voltages, I doubt the plastic is rated to insulate that high.

Be sure to check the insulation rating of them before using them at line voltage. If you don't see one, assume that since they are for vehicles, it's 12V not 120V.

That also can go for those "butt splice" crimp on, as well as any type of automotive connectors as well. But most of these are rated at 20amps, line voltage isn't usually more than that from a standard outlet, most often it's only 15 amp rated.

But I will say this for the automotive T-Taps, I've used them as splices for 120VAC/20amp wire and I have yet to ever feel one get hot or even mildly warm. I've had commercial LED strand rectifiers get mildly to moderately warm as opposed to these taps.

However, with that said, use them at your own risk.

FWIW: it's NOT the voltage that does the damage, it's the amperage that causes problems.

Edited by Orville
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... and it's not AMPERAGE that determines insulation thickness, it's VOLTAGE. Isn't this the second time I've corrected you on that? read here:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulator_(electrical)

I'll quote the important part: "When subjected to a high enough voltage, insulators suffer from the phenomenon of electrical breakdown." (emphasis mine)

FYI: A mere 10mA across the heart is enough to KILL, so even your 'It's the amperage that kills you statement' is barely a 1/2 truth. While it is true that a jillion volts can't hurt you if the amperage is .00000000000000001A, at any voltage over 40V (and before you ask, AC OR DC) as little as .010A can be FATAL.

Why 40V? Wouldn't you know that's about the voltage that human skin stops being an insulator and starts being a conductor due to the aforementioned electrical breakdown?

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Where is that damn popcorn eating thingy mac bob?

Have to agree with that darn viking. It might be current that kills (.01A). But it is the voltage that pushes the current. And as long as the connector is beefy enough to carry the current. It is the dielectric voltage rating that one has to also note. Otherwise the voltage can punch right through the insulator.

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When is it that someone that is so oblivious to common sense going to learn to quit spewing crap all over the place that is going to do nothing more than get themselves or someone else killed. I mean seriously if you want to kill yourself feel free but quit giving advise that can kill others. If you don't like my tone tough crap I'm just sick of ignorance and further more the tolerance to allow such ignorance to occur, especially when the igmorance can and will turn deadly!

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I don't mean to cause a pop-corn break. I just have a thing for safety.

Look, the easy thing to do is just use standard off-the-shelf stuff. When you do that, there are only a few EASY TO UNDERSTAND rules you need to follow. When you expand into more creative solutions, you absolutely MUST know what you are doing. I am not saying that you can't do things 'off book' safely. You can. But it takes more knowledge than just 'plug A goes to socket B'. You need to understand the fundamentals.

The fundamentals include more than just 'Wire move power!' You need to learn WHY things work the way they do. You need to know the finer points. Accumulating this knowledge should be viewed as being just as fun as buying a new controller.

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Ok, First I do not know who rescue is talking to, but maybe you need to tone it down a bit. Mike, the popcorn bit was about Orville and his comments towards your comments.

I have to admit, it has been some years since I last looked at those Scotch lok taps. And I really do not remember the voltage rating of those devices.

Back to rescue for a minute. how about jumping in here and lending a hand. Instead of sitting back and blowing up when someone makes a mistake.. Your starting to sound like me last year. :P

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I know... I'm not blaming anyone, but I am the source for the initial comment which caused the popcorn to start poppin :)

I can understand other's frustration when they see things that are potentially deadly. I'm not saying that it's OK to beat on someone (and really, that's not my call, it's the admins').

BUT

This isn't needlepoint, scrap booking, or model trains where the worst that can happen is a little blood and a damaged ego. This is electricity and it is NOT forgiving. There are VERY few links in the accident chain that lead from 'ooops' to dead when we talk about the flow of electrons.

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Ok, First I do not know who rescue is talking to, but maybe you need to tone it down a bit. Mike, the popcorn bit was about Orville and his comments towards your comments.

Sorry Paul was doing it on my phone and didnt try to quote, but no it was not aimed at you, there are just certain individuals on this forum that constantly spew unsafe practices and try to promote them. with that said no I wont tone down because I'm not going to watch stupidity kill.

Back to rescue for a minute. how about jumping in here and lending a hand. Instead of sitting back and blowing up when someone makes a mistake.. Your starting to sound like me last year. :P

I would love to jump in and help but as I said above some people refuse to ever admit they are wrong and seeing they have done every job on earth including correct engineers they are never wrong. And lord knows I'm the bully seeing I got upset with someone for promoting unsafe practices, but you know what at the same time it seems some of the LOR staff is finally opening there eyes to some of the spewing ignorance going on here and finally stepping in trying to stop it. Plain and simple short cuts in alot of things in life work great, shortcuts with electricity kills, so don't promote using 12volt items in a 120 volt world.

But now that I am off my soap box yes I am more than happy to help out you can ask several members we communicate often via PM. if the whole PC, got to treat everything with kid glove so no one got offended thing would go away I would help out here more.

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Guys - I think EVERYONE is missing the point.

I've yet to see where anyone has addressed the thread's title, and come up with a method of connecting vampire's butts. I haven't even seen anyone explain WHY a person would want to connect the butt of one vampire to another. Can we please get this thread back on track here?

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I am an electriciain, But I am also a human. I have a bad tendency to prove that to often. But I have also seen those times that I get on my soap box, that someone calls me on it. Oh! I fully agree that electricity can kill. And I have been very lucky with the number of times I have been bit.

And good advice is to check out (make sure) that all of the free advice is good advice. Again homework is important in this hobby. I try to give good advice, but it also helps to have others verify or double check that advice. I know if I should get stumped and ask a question. I will not just jump at the first reply.

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well first off yes i responded to his first post it did not mention voltage used and i posted a possible source in no way did i promote any unsafe act or try to convince anyone to do any thing or buy any thing i think i see where this is headed and where its coming from mike im not refering to you or your post

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I am an electriciain, But I am also a human. I have a bad tendency to prove that to often. But I have also seen those times that I get on my soap box, that someone calls me on it. Oh! I fully agree that electricity can kill. And I have been very lucky with the number of times I have been bit.

(I'm going to use you as an example, and it is going to sound like I am belittling you. I'm not - my point is going to be that 'If Even a pro....')

And therein is the problem I see. You are a professional, yet even you have made mistakes. If someone like you with training and experience can make a mistake, the guy that does this for a hobby is MUCH more dangerous.

Those few times you were bit, I'll bet one of 2 things happened: 1 - For some reason you didn't follow best practices and got whacked. 2 - You followed best practices and those saved you from being a statistic.

I admit I've been whacked a few times. Back in the 80s I worked in an arcade and serviced Video games and Pinball machines. I remember cleaning this one pin table with the vacuum. I made sure I had the power off while working in there. The next thing I know, I'm on my backside about 3 ft away. Yea, the switch was off, but the table was still plugged in and there was line voltage in the cabinet. I touched it :) ( or should I say :( )

I knew better. I should have pulled the plug. Thankfully I was doing the 'TV safety' thing by only using 1 hand while the other was in my pocket. Otherwise I shudder at what the consequences would have been.

I also agree with your assessment of getting a 2nd opinion. That's good advice in everything.

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Guys - I think EVERYONE is missing the point.

I've yet to see where anyone has addressed the thread's title, and come up with a method of connecting vampire's butts. I haven't even seen anyone explain WHY a person would want to connect the butt of one vampire to another. Can we please get this thread back on track here?

Every time I read the thread title, I keep thinking there is a job I will never be desparate enough to take.

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My two cents worth says to use C7 bulbs on SPT1 or SPT2 wire.

Get preassembled sockets or install your own just as long as you need them to be.

It's all 120 volts AC no matter which strings are put onto the trees in what order.

Run a longer length for the male plug and you're good to go.

Your situation is you have 30 wonderful trees to decorate (I'm jealous) and a gajillion sockets to install (I'm not jealous).

Also you have invested a lot already in the LED style of lights.

The type of lights you have, have strange wiring (some are in series, some are in parallel with each other) and some resistors and maybe some diodes thrown in the mix.

Those are difficult lights to customize without a bit more engineering on your part.

That engineering is risky and all of the above people are trying to keep you from turning into a crispy critter.

If these were low voltage strings (5v-24v) and you made a mistake, you would just let the Secret Smoke out, and learn from it.

I'm not sure that there's an easy solution, unless others have a novel (and safe) idea.

Any other suggestions, anyone?

Edited by Ken Benedict
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Honestly I think the easiest would be to use either black out caps or like you mentioned tape off the lights you don't want to see, but that would end up being costly and wasteful with the amount of lost lights. The next best bet would be like Stephen said and I would cut, strip soldier, seems to be easier than having to crimp so much.

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Sorry need to finish off part of this O.T.

Mike no problem using me for the min. BTW each time the shock was across the one hand from say thumb to pinky.

Note about those Scotch loks. In my mind but forgot to mention. What if the insulation is say 32VDC. What happens when you then wrap them in standard black electric tape? Is it now possible to use those connections without worry about getting shocked while handling them with power applied? Cause that is how I would install them. First a good wrap on one then a wraps of electric tape around both to hide those blue or red splices to make it look neater.

Thats all I got to say about this. Sorry Col.

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