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When cutting RGB strips, what works best to prep for soldering?


Santas Helper

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Hope the title sounds right.

If I have a 16' strip but want to cut it shorter and then solder the other part with a couple feet of wire (making two seperate sections but on the same channel), what is the best method to strip down to the surface under the protective coating to get to the pads to solder the wire on?

I was thinking a razor blade and trim it down to the pads?

A heat source to met it off?

Not sure if others have tried or even ran into this situation. Thought I would ask before exploring on my own.

If I confused anyone, please let me know.

Thanks,

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If this is the solid silicone/resin type then its just a case of using a razor blade. The coating comes off very easily from the pads. Just make sure when you cut that you dont apply too much pressure as you will then damage the tracks on the strip. Then its just a matter of removing the cut coating with the razor blade tip and making sure that the pads have no coating on them. I definetly would not use a heat source and there really is no reason to.

So i think you already know what you need to do, but are unsure of what the results will be. So give it a go, take your time with it and again make sure you dont apply to much pressure when cutting the coating as that will damage the strip tracks.

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If this is the solid silicone/resin type then its just a case of using a razor blade. The coating comes off very easily from the pads. Just make sure when you cut that you dont apply too much pressure as you will then damage the tracks on the strip. Then its just a matter of removing the cut coating with the razor blade tip and making sure that the pads have no coating on them. I definetly would not use a heat source and there really is no reason to.

So i think you already know what you need to do, but are unsure of what the results will be. So give it a go, take your time with it and again make sure you dont apply to much pressure when cutting the coating as that will damage the strip tracks.

Thanks,

yes, the solid resin (waterproof) type

And yes, I was unsure of the results trying the razor blade method. I guess it's just being careful not to use too much force like you mentioned.

Thanks again,

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You don't need to solder! William pointed me to these after I had done mine with soldering. This vendor has what you need to git R done!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/20X-RGB-Connector-PCB-Adapter-3528-5050-RGB-LED-Strip-10mm-Strip-Strip-D-/320926275708?pt=US_Lighting_Parts_and_Accessories&hash=item4ab8b2587c

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You don't need to solder! William pointed me to these after I had done mine with soldering. This vendor has what you need to git R done!

http://www.ebay.com/...=item4ab8b2587c

Jim,

you might have missed my point. I will be "cutting" the strips in two seperate pieces and reconnecting them with an extion in between.

I'm going to have no way to connect with those in the link you provided once I cut the strip.

If your senario is the same as mine, what did you do differently to make this happen? How did you connect the end that was cut without soldering?

Maybe I'm missing something?

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Those connectors snap onto the strip after you cut. As when you cut you still have the solder pads on both the parts of the strip. Those provide a quick way to attach them as they have small pads that contact the solder pads on the strip and carry the wire. You would still need to waterproof everything you have done with these regardless. His post was to save time on the soldering, not the removal of the resin. This would be the extension in between without having to solder to the actual strip.

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The reason i prefer to solder on the Ray 4 pin and 3 pin plugs than use these connectors is because this makes everything modular and easy to setup, pack down and store. The soldering is less effort than most would think. Just use some clear heatshrink and put a dab of non corrosive neatral cure silicone inside the heatshrink and shrink the heatshrink. You will then get a great weatherproof connection. With these connectors you will still have to attach/solder a plug or add additional wire length anyway.

Still the connectors are not a bad option for those who think soldering may beyond their skills.

But as also mentioned in a previous thread, these connectors come in different widths so its important to ensure you buy the right sized connector to suit the strip. Also a 4 pin connector will not work with a 3 wire strip.

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Those connectors snap onto the strip after you cut. As when you cut you still have the solder pads on both the parts of the strip. Those provide a quick way to attach them as they have small pads that contact the solder pads on the strip and carry the wire. You would still need to waterproof everything you have done with these regardless. His post was to save time on the soldering, not the removal of the resin. This would be the extension in between without having to solder to the actual strip.

Thank you very much for explaining this. I did not know those existed. Something to think about.

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The reason i prefer to solder on the Ray 4 pin and 3 pin plugs than use these connectors is because this makes everything modular and easy to setup, pack down and store. The soldering is less effort than most would think. Just use some clear heatshrink and put a dab of non corrosive neatral cure silicone inside the heatshrink and shrink the heatshrink. You will then get a great weatherproof connection. With these connectors you will still have to attach/solder a plug or add additional wire length anyway.

Still the connectors are not a bad option for those who think soldering may beyond their skills.

But as also mentioned in a previous thread, these connectors come in different widths so its important to ensure you buy the right sized connector to suit the strip. Also a 4 pin connector will not work with a 3 wire strip.

You have a very good point. And I was wondering as to what you said, size of the connectors. My job at work work requires soldering so I feel good about my abilities. Looks like two options to think about here.

Thanks again very much.

Very helpful from both parties. :)

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Just my opinion about connectors and being outside. Heck I work with some of the older controllers. Thank God we are replacing some of these. But the point is this. Contacts oxide and signals fail over time. I looked at those connectors and I dont see gold plating on the contacts. So, they are going to be more susceptible to failing. I believe in the power of soldered connections. Less likely to fail. But someone did make a good suggestion. Add some of that no-ox grease to help keep the contacts clean and working for you.

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Thank you for your thoughts and input Max-Paul.

For sure things to think about.

I'm probably goin with the soldering of stranded wire method.

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