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Hey guys-

I am planning to go with LOR next year- and just trying to figure out how to accomplish this. My roof lines carry about 14amps total (I run 20 amp circuits). If I want them ALL to stay in sequence together- and operate off one channel, how do I wire that up? Can I have one circuit dedicated to one channel in LOR? Do I just have that one circuit wire directly into my LOR box, then out to the lights? Or, do I have to span this across multiple channels?

Thanks for the help...

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Well, the triacs are rated at 16 amps, so, theoretically, if you only used one triac per bank, you could put 14 amps on it, although that's pushing the limits. Best option is probably an SSR or using multiple channels.

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Robin wrote:

You don't.
I believe that there is a max. of 8amps per a single channel. Check the instructions, LOR web site and the Wiki.


That's mainly due to heat buildup from the other triacs and limitted heat sink space. They are actually 16 amp triacs. I think 14 amp is pushing the limits, but you *can* go a bit above 8 if you have the larger heat sinks.
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You could easily split the lights up onto two channels, and turn them on and off simultaneously. I do that in a lot of parts of my sequences, though not for power reasons, just because I want that part of the song to have two channels doing the exact same thing at the same time.

D.T.

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You can try and go the SSR method but you will not be able to dim, just off and on.

I had this same problem this year because my entire roof line takes 13 amps per color and I have 3 colors, Red, White, & Green which takes a total of 29 amps. I had to split it up on 6 channels, 2 channels per color so each channel was around 7 amps. What then gets tricky is you can only have 15 amps per side on a controller. If I put 2 of my channels from the roof on the same controller, I was at 14 amps and only had 1 more amp for 6 channels. I ended up only putting 1 roof channel per side of my controllers (I have 5 controllers) so I would have sufficient amps for the other channels.

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Yea , I would use a few channels to do this. Like channel 1 and 9 .The triacs can hold a load at 8 Amps but can surge to 16Amps for a few seconds. I would say you are at risk of blowing a triac if using one channel. And you wont be able to hook much to the rest of the channels only having 4 Amps left to use on that side of the controller.

Just food for thought

Mike

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ok- soo...

When the power comes into the LOR unit- does it all come off of ONE outlet/circuit? Or, can I hook up multiple circuits to the input? So for example- obviously my roof lines have to be on their own circuit due to how much power they draw in. Do I have a separate input into the controller just for that circuit itself? Then all my other outputs can run off of other circuits as well?

Mike- I'm also here in Gilbert- where's your display, and how many channels you running? I'd like to come check it out.

Thanks guys!

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A SSR is a Solid State Relay. They have different ratings so check you voltages and currents on both sides. I have not found it bad to buy one with a "higher than you might ever use" current rating :smile:

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Do I just google "solid state relay" and product info will display? Is it something I can buy at say, a Radio Shack? Does it need to be built?

So many questions....I think I need an electricity 101 class!:)


Sally

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A relay is a switch. You can have a small amount of current turn on/off the switch- but when it's on, it uses an outside current to power the thing.

So for this- you can have LOR turn ON the switch, but when it goes on, it doesn't use the current that was used to turn it on, it uses a separate power cord to actually power the lights. When the LOR says 'turn off', it closes the switch and shuts off the power to the lights.

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Okay...so the LOR channel only turns it on, what is being turned on is plugged into an alternate power source not the LOR controller. Correct?


S

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azspecter wrote:

ok- soo...

When the power comes into the LOR unit- does it all come off of ONE outlet/circuit? Or, can I hook up multiple circuits to the input? So for example- obviously my roof lines have to be on their own circuit due to how much power they draw in. Do I have a separate input into the controller just for that circuit itself? Then all my other outputs can run off of other circuits as well?


Thanks guys!


If you have the 16 channel controller, yes, their are two inputs, each for 8 channels. Each side has a fuse and I think the right side controlls the logic side of the controller. So if you do spilt the circuts then you can get your 20 amp on the 8 channels but you might have to use 2 or 3 of them. Or use all 8 for more effect, or a relay to save channels.



--Daniel L
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Yeah, I think a relay is the way to go. That way, I can just use 1-2 channels for my entire roofline- and not max out my controller and waste channels. Anyone know of a good relay that will allow dimming, twinkling, etc?

Thanks

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A relay is an ON / OFF device. You won't get any shimmer or fade out of it. If you try, the relay will just "chatter" and cause radio frequency noise and then burn out early. Not your desired intent.

Technically, what you need is a Current Amplifier, and a high wattage capable one at that. Looking on the net, I didn't find anything that made me say "Eureka!"

If you are up to the job electronically, you could just get a much higher rated Triac, mount it with its own heatsink and fused power supply and run the trigger/gate signal from the optoisolator over to the new Triac.

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Im surprised there's not an easy solution, out of the box for this in LOR. Im certainly not the only one who is running high voltage circuits all on one channel- think of the commercial displays out there. Certainly they dont buy HUNDREDS of channels just so that they can link them all together off across many channels, when all they need is 1-2 channels.

Doesn't LOR have an easy solution for this?

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RichardH wrote:

You can try and go the SSR method but you will not be able to dim, just off and on.

I had this same problem this year because my entire roof line takes 13 amps per color and I have 3 colors, Red, White, & Green which takes a total of 29 amps. I had to split it up on 6 channels, 2 channels per color so each channel was around 7 amps. What then gets tricky is you can only have 15 amps per side on a controller. If I put 2 of my channels from the roof on the same controller, I was at 14 amps and only had 1 more amp for 6 channels. I ended up only putting 1 roof channel per side of my controllers (I have 5 controllers) so I would have sufficient amps for the other channels.

This is very similar to my situation. I have 4 colors (rgbc) all C9's. So my plan at the beggining of the season was to have chanels 1-4 for each color and then use 9-12 for the other half. Well before I put all the C9's up I decided to go ahead and pop every other socket off the wire so my amps actually got cut in half. So now I can actually have them all on at the same time, when before I could only have two colors on at the same time.
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K,

First off keep in mind that all lights are C9's and that there is actually four runs of lights. One for each of the four colors.

Channel 1 is 1/2 my green lights, 2 is 1/2 my red lights, 3 is half my blue lights, and 4, is half my white lights. The other half of the lights are on channels 9,10,11 & 12. My original plan was to use normal 12" spaced lights and then when you add the other 3 colors the spacing would actually be 3" to the nearest next colored light. Well I soon discovered that the 3" was too close because you actually have to leave a little slack in the line to lay the lights like that, so the spacing is actually less. And then with the fact that the C9 bulbs are around an inch in diameter there only seemed to be between 1" - 1 1/2" from actually bulb outside to bulb outside. Way to close. So I decided to go ahead and pop every other light socket off of my strands so that from green bulb to green bulb is around 24" and from green to red is around 6".

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