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Method of narrowing beam/coverage area of spot lamp


marsh28
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I want to narrow the beam on a few of my 90 watt outdoor floods so they are more focused. Anybody know how I could do this? Would I need to attach sometime of aluminum reflector? Thanks

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Cray Augsburg

OK. This may sound a bit silly, but . . .

I used high-temp black "grill" paint to cover the "lens", leaving a much smaller opening in the center. Because of paralax, you can't get a tightly focused beam, but you can reduce the coverage. You can even make the beam oblong for vertical or horizontal elements. A little experimentation will be necessary.

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Interesting DIY solution. Was the light output still is great for the area that wasn't blacked out?

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marsh28 wrote:

I want to narrow the beam on a few of my 90 watt outdoor floods so they are more focused. Anybody know how I could do this? Would I need to attach sometime of aluminum reflector? Thanks
Have you looked at narrow beam LED floods?

had a couple of props I wanted to light up this year and last but didn't want to light up everything around it. worked great for me.
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Cray Augsburg

The area where light was allowed through the lamp's lens is as bright as it was before painting. Unfortunately, this method does not "focus" all the light from the filament and send it through the opening. It really just reduces the wideness of the beam.

And the disclaimer: Your mileage may vary.

Give it a try and see if it gives you the result you desire.

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Did this for one of my Halloween spots, take a piece of 4" solid aluminum dryer duct and cut a 12" length. Spray paint the outside black. Place it around the outside of the bulb. There will be a small gap at the bottom but that doesn't matter much. Then I used black electrical tape to hold in place. Make sure your light is a Spot bulb and not a Flood bulb.

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Of course, switching to bulbs that are spots is an option.

I use a combination of spots and floods depending on the application.

Have found over the years that I have overall better results by using the proper product for the task.


Just my opinion though.

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