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Controller 2 blew a fuse, so controller 1 won't even work?


Robert G.
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So, controller 2 blew a fuse (all of a sudden, after running for 4 days) and I replaced the fuse holder and fuse. Now for some reason controller 1 won't even power on. Both units have good fuse holders and fuses, power is running through the cords, and the switches are good. Why is board not getting any power in either controller? Also, controller 2, when switched on, the lights plugged into it flicker real fast then it shuts. Controller 1 won't even do that..Both lights on both controllers don't light up...Both controllers dead?

Again, here's a summary:



Controller 1 light doesn't flash.

Controller 2 light doesn't flash.

Both controllers are getting power through the cords and switches, but not the board.

Why would controller 2 also "kill" controller 1?

Need desperate help, thanks.

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You replaced the fuse holders in #2. Is this a showtime controller that also has the on off switch in a metal box? Do you own a volt meter? If so, have you checked the voltage at the outlet? Do you have an outlet checker to make sure your outlet is wired correctly? And I cant explain how #1 would go dead with a fuse blown on #2. Why do you think you blew a fuse anyway? Do you have any idea what your load is like on #2? Oh, and are you using 1 or 2 voltage input plugs? Is #1 and #2 on the same outlet? Same Circuit Breaker? And just to be clear, what model of controller.

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Controller 1 and 2 are the 16 channel 15A controllers, (8 on each side, 2 plugs). They are seperate outlets and circuits. Unit 2 most likely blew due to overloading it, which was fixed, but still won't turn on. All the power is fine, just why arn't these working?

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You can plug a string of lights into each of the outlets powering your controllers and they light up? Lets start there and eliminate that.

Also, suggest working on one controller at a time to avoid confusion. Disconnect all of your lights when working on the controller, so if you still have an issue with the lights, you don't keep blowing fuses or do any damage to the controller.

for controller 2, you say you replaced the fuse holder and the fuse? Why replace the fuse holder, unless it was burnt to a crisp (which would suggest bigger issues)? Not sure what model, etc., but did you actually replace the fuse holder, and if so, with one that is the proper size and physical fit? Do you have known good fuses, proper physical size? Are you sure they haven't blown again?

You say the board is not getting power, but you have power thru cord and switches. How have you verified that? You mention controller 2, when powered up, the lights flicker real fast, then it "shuts"...meaning?

If you have a DVM, you can very easily trace back from the board and see where you are losing power. Start there...the 9-16 side powers the electronics (processor, etc), so no power on that side will leave the board dark.

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We've used the proper tools to test where the power is. I replaced the fuse holder because the glass fuse blew up inside. It is the correct fuse/holder. When i say the lights flash real quick, as soon as you flip the switch on the lights flick once. The controller doesnt even get power and the light doesnt flash.

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Robert G. wrote:

We've used the proper tools to test where the power is. I replaced the fuse holder because the glass fuse blew up inside. It is the correct fuse/holder. When i say the lights flash real quick, as soon as you flip the switch on the lights flick once. The controller doesnt even get power and the light doesnt flash.

Have you verified you have 120VAC at the board? Physically put DVM probe on the board and verified it has power on both sides...1-8 and 9-16?

You say the lights flick once...but then say the controller doesn't get power....I'm confused.

There are two sides to power...the "left side", 1-8, is for channels 1-8. The "right side", 9-16, also powers the processor and all electronics. If you don't have power to that side of the board, you won't have a flashing LED.
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question I dont see it controller 2 first in the chain, if 2 cant process and send a signal, #1 cant get a signal if #2 isnt powered properly. I may be way off but anything Ive had to daisy chain in the past, the chain fails where the error starts.

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controller 1 DOES receive electrical power through the plugs and switch. Power is running through the fuse wires and such..its the fact that the board is not getting the power.

controller 2 has the same exact problem EXCEPT the board must be getting power for a split second because the lights flash once.

The controllers are not connected to eachother and no lights are connected.

Theres really no other simple way to explain this problem..

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What model controller? Are they the metal case 160X series? Or the PC series (plastic enclosure)? Assuming metal enclosure if you have a switch.

Have you opened the controller and verified no burnt wires? Can you identify the last point before the board where you have power? Thats the troubleshooting you need to do. If you have a DVM, will be failry simple.

I'm not sure there is any other troubleshooting advice that can be given other than to trace back from where power is brought to the board, and if you don't have it there, trace back to the next connection point, and see if it is there. And you need it on the 9-16 side to light up the controller electronics; thats most critical at this point.

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The light to flash on and off for a brief time is normal to see if you have lights attached to the outputs when the input cord supplying power on 9-16 is plugged in. This is the time it takes for the electronics to settle.

The original poster mentioned replaced the fuse holded because the glass fuse blew up inside the holder. I have not known LOR to ship controllers with glass fuses. They have always been the ceramic bodies fuses. So I do question the fuse being correct.

The statement made by someone that one controller has to be working to pass the signal down the line is FALSE. The signal is a daisy chain and the boards are listeners on the line for information for them. If you examine a board with NO components on it you will see the communication ports are basically all bussed together.

As far as the controller that is not powering up. You say you have power to the connections on the board. Correct? This needs to mainly be on the 9-16 side as this input side powers the electronics. If you have power all the way to the connection on the board. Do you have the 2 little jumpers on the header to the right of the transformer? You can also use the troubleshooting guide on the LOR site to help trace power on the board.

Chuck

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For those that asked, the model is the LOR1602W controller.

The reason I replaced the fuse with a class one was because the old 15 ceramic one blew, so I bought new ones. (glass.)..Not going to use those anymore.

But channels 9-16, the cords are indeed getting power.

Also, cmoore, you mentioned to check 2 little jumpers on the header? I guess I'll have to check those out. If they arn't getting the power..does that mean the boards busted?

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Robert,

The little jumpers I mention that go on the 4 pin header is what sets the voltage input for the transformer. For 120VAC there should be one jumper on the left 2 pins and 1 jumper on the right 2 pins. The jumper is the same type that is on the header up near the LED.

If they are missing or one is missing on the board that will not powerup, then the transformer is not energized. The transformer not energized, then the electronics have NO power.

Chuck

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If the controller is dead, it means either you don't have 120V at the controller board; and when I say that, I mean measured at the controller board itself. I can't tell from the thread if you have physically opened the case and checked with a voltmeter, or not.

If you had a working board, it blew a fuse or fuses, and replacing the fuse did not bring it back to life, I'd be making 100% sure you had the proper size (length..) fuse and holder. If either of those are not the right physical size, you'll have a break in the AC path, and your board will not get AC voltage. You may want to check and make sure you don't have any broken fuse pieces or debris in the fuse sockets.

As mentioned, the fuse on the right side is the critical one for the electronics on the board, and hence, a flashing LED indicating the board is alive.

My guess is, you've got a relatively simple issue with both controllers. It might be worth stepping back thru each step you took after the fuses blew, and making sure you did not create any additional issues. It seems beyond odd that you would have an issue with a second one just because a fuse blew on the first one...the only common point there is essentially your 120V supply (outlet power).

Hope that helps.

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Guest Don Gillespie

you the one thing I have not seen is have you unplugged every channel, meaning nothing plugged into the controllers, then plugged the controllers in, (you are using fast acting ceramic fuses right?) then see if the controllers stay on, if thats the case have you tried a killo-watt meter to make sure you are not overlaoded this happened to me last year the killo-watt meter saved my show keep us informed.

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