Jump to content

Puff of smoke


Richard M
 Share

Recommended Posts

Tonight I saw a puff of smoke in one of my bushes with the lights as I was outside watching. Then I noticed a few lights on other things didn't come on in the sequence. Ran up on the porch to see were the smoke came from. It was from an extension cord to the bushes. It had been raining tonight and it seems rain got in the extension cord connection. It was black and burned on the light plug. It blew a fuse on one side of my controller. I told cars the show was over and had to shut down. Now to get fuses. What a night.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NO GFCI & WET CORDS/PLUGS/LIGHT STRINGS = BURNED AND FRIED EXTENSION CORDS, LIGHT STRINGS, BLOWN FUSES, FIRES and/or DAMAGED ELECTRONICS as well as MELTED MALE/FEMALE and even the END FEMALE PLUG(s), which could ALL also short and create a fire if there isn't a GFCI in the circuit!

With GFCI & WET CORDS = TRIPPED GFCI, which in turn shuts down everything until things dry out or you find what the issue(s) is/(are) that caused it. No burned cords, melted sockets, plugs or blown fuses(in most cases).

Sounds to me like there wasn't a GFCI in the circuit, I would never do a display without one, just a great preventive measure to keep my house(and possibly even my neighbors) intact and ME(and others) ALIVE!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, and I'm going to try and be the voice of reason here.

The GFCI debate has been had many times around here. Some say you need, others don't. Some point to the NEC code for one year, and some for another year. Some say it's stupid, others smart.

Can we please not go down this road?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since I'm not allowed to post info that could possibly help or save someones home or life via a PM I received from another member, I have deleted this post.

[align=center]You're on your own.[/align]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...