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GFI protection question


solm96

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Are you asking if you need GFI's on each output of the LOR controller? If you are there is no reason as long as the power supply for the controller is in a GFI just make sure if using multiple supply cords for controller that you don't go over the amperage. If you look at multiple other post's around here you can figure the amp. usage out. in other words just your power wires will need to be protected. not your circuts(lights).

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I'm new to all this but I personally just have 4 gfi outlets that we ran 4 independent breakers for. One for each controller. So just the power for the controllers themselves.

Edit: oops The Pest beat me to the answer but yea what he said.

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Thanks for the replys.
I have 6 GFIs for 3 controllers.
Just hoping that a short on one of my channels due to water or something does not hurt the board.

I have also measured the current draw of every set of lights that will be on each channel to make sure I don't over due it on any board.

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I would say you covered your bases just fine so fire it up and watch it go blinkity blink!

Oh and if you havnt used up all your channels yet. I would say leave a couple of open channels just in case something does go funky with one channel you have a backup. I left 3 channels open for backup, you just never know.

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Jeff Millard wrote:

solm96 wrote:
Just hoping that a short on one of my channels due to water or something does not hurt the board.


8< snip >8
So, the GFCI will protect against protected circuit to earth ground faults, but will not be of any help with shorts that occur between the hot and neutral.

Jeff


Okay, that makes no sense to me Jeff. If my GFCI gets a short, it trips, and if that short is still present when I try to reset it, it won't reset. I mistakenly wired something with a dead short some time back, when I plugged it in, the GFCI tripped, but you're saying it's NOT supposed to work that way at all? At least that's what I'm reading or am I missing something?

I thought GFCI's were to protect from both shorts and circuit interuptions, such as a bulb socket that may be sitting in a pool of water will trip it, had that happen on some wire frame deer, moved the bulbs up the legs off the ground and no more GFCI trips. But they don't protect from shorts per your reply and I have always thought they did both, mainly because I tripped mine when I miswired something.
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