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hard drive crash


doug petschke

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Ther comes a time when the ole hard drive on the computer craps out.

this time i was somewhat prepared.

Tip 1 back yer chit up!

Tip 2

I had all of my sequences backed up on a cd (the whole LOR folder

I had most of the audio too!

Tip 3

I had saved my license email

Tip 4

I had saved an email from lightorama dan from the last time i had a crash!

I upgraded from the website

EVERYTHING went as smooth as silk.

I still havent tried to run everything yet but... I am hoping for sucess there too.



BTW Thanks Dan and LOR

back to sequencing!

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All i need to do now is learn how to type!

doug petschke wrote:

Ther comes a time when the ole hard drive on the computer craps out.

this time i was somewhat prepared.

Tip 1 back yer chit up!

Tip 2

I had all of my sequences backed up on a cd (the whole LOR folder

I had most of the audio too!

Tip 3

I had saved my license email

Tip 4

I had saved an email from lightorama dan from the last time i had a crash!

I upgraded from the website

EVERYTHING went as smooth as silk.

I still havent tried to run everything yet but... I am hoping for sucess there too.



BTW Thanks Dan and LOR

back to sequencing!
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Strange...one of my hard drives burned up tonight...just finished taking parts off an extra one I had and got the burned one up and running so I could get to the files on it...

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Just last week the hard drive on my lap top died. I lost everything on that computer. Not much on there that I needed except all the sequences from last year which I probably wont use much of since I am expanding this year to many more channels. I did have every thing sequences, music etc on my desktop, portable HD and flash drives so all I had to reinstall was the software for a few programs. I just thought I have not installed the lor software yet. Guess I better do that.
Terry

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Just found a free software package that you can backup your files to another one of your computers if you have them networked.

Only have to pay if you want to use the remote feature. You will need a high speed internet connection to make the remote work well.

So I can now backup all my computers to each other, have three computers and each one will be backuped to the other two.

http://www.crashplan.com/

Remember, it is free if you backup to your own computers.

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Tip 3

I had saved my license email

This is definitely a good idea, but I just want to point out that you can retrieve your license information from the LOR website:

http://lightorama.com/LicenseRetrieval.html

Again, though, in any case, it's definitely a good idea to save your license information yourself.
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I lost a hard drive once... with a lot of very personal pictures on it:{.

Last week, after maxing out the 11TB of space I had, I decided it was time to get more space, and also to back up everything that was irreplaceable.

I now have a Synergy NAS (network storage) unit with two 3TB hard drives set up in Raid (exact same files on both drives). This way i can access all my stuff from anywhere in the house via the network cable/wifi, and it's always backed up. Giving me 3TB of space for my most irreplaceable files.

I can access the files on the drive from anywhere with an internet connection... but I'm still trying to figure out how to set that part up, so far I can only get it on my iPhone over wifi, haha... But it's pretty awesome having over 30,000 songs on your iphone without sacrificing the phones hard drive space, lol.

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It never ceases to amaze me how many people will invest all kinds of money and time into their computers, the software put on them, and of course all the data, and yet not have a simple, reliable backup and restore strategy.

Internet-based remote backup is an interesting part of the potential recovery solution, but it is by no means the simplest to deal with at a time where a catastrophe has happened and you're trying to get everything "back the way it was".

A much simpler and very cost-effective approach is to make an actual physical image of your drive, which can be restored as quickly as the time it takes to remove the old one and install the backup one. You can also create online backups for times where both the original and the physical are lost, such as in a fire, flood, etc.

I am pretty fond of the Acronis product line. They are available at very reasonable price points and are very well designed.

Fabian

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If you are not Jeff AKA ubber-geek, then i strongly suggest carbonate. I sell at least one license every week. it is fantastic, $55 per computer per year and it is backed up to the internet, saves versions, and you can log into the website and download your files if you are away from your home.

Personally I put EVERYTHING onto a server and run carbonite on that. Currently I have just over 2 tb backed up for $55!

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Fabian wrote:


I am pretty fond of the Acronis product line. They are available at very reasonable price points and are very well designed.

Fabian


I agree. I started off on the wrong foot with them, but it turns out that it was the hidden Dell partition that was killing me. Once I found how to kill that program after copying the main partition to the larger drive, but before booting it the first time, all was well. For everything else since, I have had good experiences with them.
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-klb- wrote:



I agree. I started off on the wrong foot with them, but it turns out that it was the hidden Dell partition that was killing me. Once I found how to kill that program after copying the main partition to the larger drive, but before booting it the first time, all was well. For everything else since, I have had good experiences with them.


That recovery partition is pretty useless in most recovery sitations, particularly hard drive failures. Plus, recovery to me is NOT "reinstall everything from scratch", but rather "get me back where I was RIGHT AWAY". It's a lot faster to swap a drive than to reinstall Windows and all your apps.

Fabian
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Jim Saul wrote:

If you are not Jeff AKA ubber-geek, then i strongly suggest carbonate. I sell at least one license every week. it is fantastic, $55 per computer per year and it is backed up to the internet, saves versions, and you can log into the website and download your files if you are away from your home.

Personally I put EVERYTHING onto a server and run carbonite on that. Currently I have just over 2 tb backed up for $55!

I am with Jim, I worry that the best network home back up plan is still vulnerable to a fire or a break in. I feel much better with an off site back up. Carbonite is my choice, I just renewed and got 3 years plus one extra month for $129. It runs in the background and I have used it to restore once on a failed hard drive and again when I got a new PC.
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i dont have the cash flow i have to use mine for me season HUSKER tickets and donations to get the tickets...

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huskernut wrote:

I am with Jim,  I worry that the best network home back up plan is still vulnerable to a fire or a break in.


Acronis offers BOTH options in one license if you want, or license just the software and still use some other vendor like Carbonite for that warm and fuzzy offsite thing. The image-based backup lets you get up and running again without having to reinstall your OS and all the drivers on a new drive (which hopefully you have somewhere because without them you can't get to the internet), install all your software, and download all your data back. Using an offsite-only solution doesn't help until you're several hours into the restoration process.

I feel much better with an off site back up.


That only works for individual files. If you lose your hard drive, having a duplicate, with everything already installed, means hours of work eliminated. You can then lay over only your offsite-backed up files that are newer than your imaged drive. You're back up completely in less than 30 minutes.
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Having just gone through the install new disk, build system, and recover a bunch of files off the old disk, I can confirm that I still don't have everything back on this PC a month later. I still find myself working around taking the time to install some tools.

But the PC is much happier overall. It had 4 years of primary use since windows was last installed. Loosing all that history was quite the tune up...

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