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Convert LED lights to full-wave?


martinjc

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I saw a couple of posts where someone mentioned they converted half-wave LED strings to full wave. Has anyone tried this, and is it worth trying (maybe for sake of getting a brighter light, cleaner fade)?

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It can be done, but it requires soldering rectifiers inline and adding the appropriate resistor as well to dissipate any additional electric beyond what the LEDs in the circuit will use. The biggest concern with this project is that it is high voltage and must be sufficiently sealed from water and people. Do a google search for LED calculators and you will find a wealth of info.

Doug

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I dont know the answer but I thought I read that snubbers help the fading process? If its true, you may wanna look into it...

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I haven't tried it, but didn't someone say that if you plug the half-wave string into the rear of a full-wave string that the half-wave string gets full-wave rectified power?

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martinjc wrote:

I saw a couple of posts where someone mentioned they converted half-wave LED strings to full wave. Has anyone tried this, and is it worth trying (maybe for sake of getting a brighter light, cleaner fade)?




Why bother? Most half wave LEDs fade fine. Both full wave and half wave LEDs, depending on color, manufacturer, and # of strings, can experience fade issues. As mentioned above, snubbers (resistors) will correct most fade issues.

My new sig line - Proud owner of 60k half wave LEDs, still buying half wave LEDs, all fading just fine (love them snubbers!)
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I can see the flicker of a 1/2 wave LED and find it very very annoying on my eyes. Granted these are consumer store bought LED's I am not sure if pro LED's that are 1/2 wave have the same issue.

From my experience most people seem to see the flicker of 1/2 wave LED light and for the people that don't like LED lights most say its cause of the flicker.

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yes, I hooked up some 1/2 wave led's to a 600v bridge rectifier and added a capacitor too. Works well and fade fine. (I tried this a couple of years ago to combat the flicker seen on my mega tree.) I also used a bridge rectifier on the ac input to a 16pc card (1-8 only) and had no troubles when testing, but bever ran long term.(I wouldnt recommend to anyone unless you are willing to risk a board. I didn't try on 9-16 because this is the logic side of the board as I recall).

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thanks, I tried a 110v bridge rectifier on the on the AC input side of the light string, but not with much success. And to be honest I can't see any flicker even during a ramp up and down. I did fine that I needed to adjust the ramp from 10-70%, just because of the when they are full on/off, but as I understand that holds true for both 1/2 wave and full.

I;ve already got a couple of thousand invested in the 1/2 wave, so I'm not going to change now.


thanks again.

John

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Dr. Jones wrote:



yes, I hooked up some 1/2 wave led's to a 600v bridge rectifier and added a capacitor too. Works well and fade fine. (I tried this a couple of years ago to combat the flicker seen on my mega tree.) I also used a bridge rectifier on the ac input to a 16pc card (1-8 only) and had no troubles when testing, but bever ran long term.(I wouldnt recommend to anyone unless you are willing to risk a board. I didn't try on 9-16 because this is the logic side of the board as I recall).

Doc, the reason you would not want to try that bridge rectifier on the 9-16 bank AC input is because a transformer can not transform with a DC voltage on its input windings. Might of fact you are more than likely will smoke the input windings with DC applied to it. Remember what might look like 1K ohms impedance when an AC voltage is applied to a coil. Will look like 50 ohms to a DC voltage (those numbers are for illustration purpose only, not real numbers.)
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