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Cell-Turn on then off in 1 cell


xmasjam
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I saw in some sequences that in the middle of a cell there is a On the Off or fade. Example lets say 1 cell is 30 second 0-10 of cell is off the 10-20 of same cell is on then 20-30 in cell is off again, all in 1 cell. how is that done? I went through all options on the toolbar and I can,t get it to work.:?

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Hi, I'm not sure I'm understanding you correctly, but I think what you are seeing is a sequence that was done to a smaller timing grid. Some of the people here sequence down to .01(one hundredth) of a second, so if you are looking at it in a .10(one tenth) grid then you will see one box for every 10 that the other person used to sequence.

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No it's not a smaller grid. A few cells in a sequence has a cell that has a on in the center of a cell and off at the beginning and end of it or a small on at the beginning of cell and the rest of that same cell is off, all done in a single cell. Here is a link to one of a sequence of what I'm talking about. This might help if the link works.
files.me.com/c_n_c/yn60lp

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yup it is that the track was sequenced at .05 seconds. try this:

click on Edit --> timing --> switch timing grid.

click on the switch to a new fixed timing grid, and enter .05 in there, then done.

you will have LOTS more boxes in your grid and they will line up.

One more thing, you are going to want to use the zoom time in tool on the toolbar so you can see the sequences clearer.

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Hey Jim,

There are already a bunch of "Timings" already embedded in the sequence.

xmasjam, Look at the top right part of your sequence editor at the "Timings" button. To the far, far right there is a drop down arrow. Click that and you will see the timing marks that are included in the sequence.

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The "different timing grid" explanation is probably correct, but there are some other possibilities for why an event might not line up with timings:

* "Paste by time" doesn't pay attention to timings

* The Chase tool doesn't either

* A timing used to create the event might have been subsequently deleted

Maybe other possible reasons, too, but those are the ones that come to mind. Again, though, "different timing grid" seems very likely.

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I have sets of things in my display that range from 4 up to sixteen parts (or segments). In the course of sequencing a song I'm apt to have beats subdivided by multiples or fractions of those numbers depending on how "fast" or 'slow" I want something to move. In any given sequence I'll very likely incorporate all those items that Bob cited. Sometimes I get so many timing marks in a track trying to get just the right look that I can't even remember which ones marked full beats anymore so I just delete them all and run the beat wizard again.

Often I'll divide a beat up into smaller chunks to create a pattern and then delete those timing marks to make it easier to cut and paste by cell. Someone else looking at it later could see a ramp up, full on, ramp down all in the same timing just like what Xmas described. Or they'd see events beginning or ending in the middle of cells. The more sophisticated a sequence is, the more difficult it would be for someone else to easily modify it.

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I create a free form timing that matches close to what I start with 0.1 second and right click and sub divide the timing in that cell.

For example: I have a nut cracker that that flashes to the vocals. If I want him to flash 1/2 way through a cel I right click and divide the cel into 2.

So someone could divide the cell into 3 ramp up in one full on the next and ramp down in the 3rd.

I hope that makes sense. I am away from my computer so this is all from the top of my head.

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George Simmons wrote:

I have sets of things in my display that range from 4 up to sixteen parts (or segments).  In the course of sequencing a song I'm apt to have beats subdivided by multiples or fractions of those numbers depending on how "fast" or 'slow" I want something to move.  In any given sequence I'll very likely incorporate all those items that Bob cited.  Sometimes I get so many timing marks in a track trying to get just the right look that I can't even remember which ones marked full beats anymore so I just delete them all and run the beat wizard again.

This is the reason I will nearly always work in a duplicated timing grid... My issue is that I sometimes find I have enough duplicates, that I can't remember which ones have what, and will wind up deleting duplicates until I am down to one or two known timing grids. (So I just replace one issue with a different one)
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