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LightORamaDan

Cosmic Color Ribbon Videos

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Hmm. interesting thought about a mega tree out of them however, the viewing radius of the LED's are 120 degrees. Therefore, the back of the tree would not be visible from the front like a standard bulb tree is.

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HowardShank wrote:

Hmm. interesting thought about a mega tree out of them however, the viewing radius of the LED's are 120 degrees. Therefore, the back of the tree would not be visible from the front like a standard bulb tree is.


RGB ribbon is manufactured in a "side view" form where the LEDs are mounted on the edge. Maybe LOR will use those for the next generation. In a year or two maybe rope light will be sold like this. That would be the ultimate.

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brianfox wrote:

HowardShank wrote:
Hmm. interesting thought about a mega tree out of them however, the viewing radius of the LED's are 120 degrees. Therefore, the back of the tree would not be visible from the front like a standard bulb tree is.


RGB ribbon is manufactured in a "side view" form where the LEDs are mounted on the edge. Maybe LOR will use those for the next generation. In a year or two maybe rope light will be sold like this. That would be the ultimate.




Thanks for the heads up. I didn't catch that. i think it would still work, but would need it toward the back of the display. I guess I'll have to get one to see how "bendy" and manuverable they actually are.

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brianfox wrote:

John Hertig wrote:
LightORamaDan wrote:

Piecing together other information, it appears there are 150 'light sources', each of which has 3 color elements in it. So 3 of these 'light sources' make up a 'pixel', correct? And a 'pixel' would be a 'dash' rather than a 'point'?

From the pictures, it looks like the pixel is indeed a point. The RGB LED is a single small square device, not three discrete LEDs in a row.

I could be wrong about this, but... the LOR picture shows a segment of the overall cable. This segment contains three pixels (3 RGB LEDs). The segments are spliced together at the ends. I believe the black rectangular device is some sort of MUX that allows specific LEDs to be addressed by the PWM logic. The LEDs on normal RGB ribbon are not individually controlled; the whole ribbon is a solid color.

It is all very confusing but we will have more information out soon to help answer some of the questions.

Our use of the word pixel also leads to some confusion. The CCR can be set to different resolutions simular to the way that a monitor on a PC can be set to different resolutions. But there are big differences.

At its lowest resolution (1) the whole CCR strip (all 150 RGB LEDs) is one pixel. Because it is one RGB pixel, it is controlled by 3 channels: one channel for Red, one channel for Green and one channel for Blue.... With a resolution of 1 the strip's color can be one color only. If you adjust the Red channel then all of the red components of each of the 150 LEDs on the strip is affected.

At the next resolution (2) the whole CCR strip is two pixels (the first 75 RGB LEDs are one pixel, the second 75 RGB LEDs is the second pixel). With a resolution of 2 the strip's color can be controlled by 6 channels. 3 channels for the Red Green Blue of the first pixel, 3 channels for the Red Green Blue of the second pixel.

At the highest resolution (50) the CCR strip is 50 pixels ( the first 3 RGB LEDs are the first pixel, the next 3 RGB LEDs are the next pixel... It will take 150 channels to control the color.

Each of the 150 RGB LEDs on the strip has a Red LED, A Green LED and a Blue LED in side of it. So in some terms there are 450 LEDS on the strip ( 150 red, 150 Green,...)

To the point of a Pixel being a strip vs a point... Yes it is. That strip is anywhere from 3 LEDs to 150 LEDs long depending on the resolution that is set on the strip. The physical characteristics of the CCR are such that the highest resolution we can have is 50 thus at the highest resolution groups of three LEDs will be acting the same.


In most of the video demonstration, the strip was set to a single pixel and here is where some of the magic of the macros comes into play. Because it is set to a single color you can set the color with 3 channels BUT at the same time with the macros you can have motion within that single pixel.

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LightORamaDan wrote:

brianfox wrote:
John Hertig wrote:
LightORamaDan wrote:

Piecing together other information, it appears there are 150 'light sources', each of which has 3 color elements in it. So 3 of these 'light sources' make up a 'pixel', correct? And a 'pixel' would be a 'dash' rather than a 'point'?

From the pictures, it looks like the pixel is indeed a point. The RGB LED is a single small square device, not three discrete LEDs in a row.

I could be wrong about this, but... the LOR picture shows a segment of the overall cable. This segment contains three pixels (3 RGB LEDs). The segments are spliced together at the ends. I believe the black rectangular device is some sort of MUX that allows specific LEDs to be addressed by the PWM logic. The LEDs on normal RGB ribbon are not individually controlled; the whole ribbon is a solid color.

It is all very confusing but we will have more information out soon to help answer some of the questions.

Our use of the word pixel also leads to some confusion. The CCR can be set to different resolutions simular to the way that a monitor on a PC can be set to different resolutions. But there are big differences.

At its lowest resolution (1) the whole CCR strip (all 150 RGB LEDs) is one pixel. Because it is one RGB pixel, it is controlled by 3 channels: one channel for Red, one channel for Green and one channel for Blue.... With a resolution of 1 the strip's color can be one color only. If you adjust the Red channel then all of the red components of each of the 150 LEDs on the strip is affected.

At the next resolution (2) the whole CCR strip is two pixels (the first 75 RGB LEDs are one pixel, the second 75 RGB LEDs is the second pixel). With a resolution of 2 the strip's color can be controlled by 6 channels. 3 channels for the Red Green Blue of the first pixel, 3 channels for the Red Green Blue of the second pixel.

At the highest resolution (50) the CCR strip is 50 pixels ( the first 3 RGB LEDs are the first pixel, the next 3 RGB LEDs are the next pixel... It will take 150 channels to control the color.

Each of the 150 RGB LEDs on the strip has a Red LED, A Green LED and a Blue LED in side of it. So in some terms there are 450 LEDS on the strip ( 150 red, 150 Green,...)

To the point of a Pixel being a strip vs a point... Yes it is. That strip is anywhere from 3 LEDs to 150 LEDs long depending on the resolution that is set on the strip. The physical characteristics of the CCR are such that the highest resolution we can have is 50 thus at the highest resolution groups of three LEDs will be acting the same.


In most of the video demonstration, the strip was set to a single pixel and here is where some of the magic of the macros comes into play. Because it is set to a single color you can set the color with 3 channels BUT at the same time with the macros you can have motion within that single pixel.




So it's pretty much official, no RGB color picker yet?

Is that something that you might work on for next year, or should I give up on it?

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thebaronn wrote:


So it's pretty much official, no RGB color picker yet?

Is that something that you might work on for next year, or should I give up on it?


The Cosmic Color Ribbon (CCR) is the first RGB product from LOR. The CCR will be supported in the S2 software when we ship the product. Software support will include various things including the concept of a RGB channel and the ability to choose colors for that channel.

Dan

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Hi Felas , me again

i have one cuestion, are there son manual video tutorial how instal the ribon led package with my lor16 channels?

thanks

its water proof?

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I have a question. I've made sure all my current white LED's are the "warm" (look like incadescent lights) and not the "cool" (has a bluish tint). What does the "white" look like on the Cosmic Color Ribbon?

I'm guessing since there are 2,000,000 color posibilities that I could find something that would match my white lights but would like to know what the default white looks like.

Jeff

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barbosaa wrote:

Hi Felas , me again

i have one cuestion, are there son manual video tutorial how instal the ribon led package with my lor16 channels?

thanks

its water proof?


Yes it is water proof... We will have some turorials but they will not be ready for some tme.

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JeffBlan wrote:

I have a question. I've made sure all my current white LED's are the "warm" (look like incadescent lights) and not the "cool" (has a bluish tint). What does the "white" look like on the Cosmic Color Ribbon?

I'm guessing since there are 2,000,000 color posibilities that I could find something that would match my white lights but would like to know what the default white looks like.

Jeff

I did not see a bluish tint when they were white. They look very white to me.

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JeffBlan wrote:

I have a question. I've made sure all my current white LED's are the "warm" (look like incadescent lights) and not the "cool" (has a bluish tint). What does the "white" look like on the Cosmic Color Ribbon?

White LEDs are made by coating blue LEDs with phosphor. More layers of phosphor can produce a broader color spectrum, producing a more "warm" white. "Warm" white LEDs cost more to produce than "cool" white LEDs, which let more of the light from the blue LED to show.

On the other hand, a RGB LED, such as those used in the CCR, produces white by combining all three primary (additive) colors. Therefore, the white will only have a bluish tint if you purposely set the red intensity lower. You could also make a white with a yellowish tint by setting the blue intensity lower.

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Steven wrote:

White LEDs are made by coating blue LEDs with phosphor. More layers of phosphor can produce a broader color spectrum, producing a more "warm" white. "Warm" white LEDs cost more to produce than "cool" white LEDs, which let more of the light from the blue LED to show.

On the other hand, a RGB LED, such as those used in the CCR, produces white by combining all three primary (additive) colors. Therefore, the white will only have a bluish tint if you purposely set the red intensity lower. You could also make a white with a yellowish tint by setting the blue intensity lower.


Steven,

Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night:) Thanks for the infomation and as I was looking at your picture, do you take your hat off when you eat?

Dan

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Steven,

Thanks for the insight! I never really knew the details of why some looked "warm" and the others "cool". Your explanation was very helpful.

Jeff

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LightORamaDan wrote:

Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night:) Thanks for the infomation and as I was looking at your picture, do you take your hat off when you eat?

That was from Halloween 2003. If I remember correctly, I think I ate lunch while wearing the crown. :)

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LightORamaDan wrote:


The Cosmic Color Ribbon (CCR) is the first RGB product from LOR. The CCR will be supported in the S2 software when we ship the product. Software support will include various things including the concept of a RGB channel and the ability to choose colors for that channel.

Dan


To make sure I am understanding you, when the CCR ships, there will be by that time a version of the Software available for download which will allow specifying color with 1 channel (meaning complete control of the CCR with a max of 57 channels) and all 57 channels with the same controller ID, correct?

Will it include the ability to add CCR(s) to the Visualizer display without too much tedium, and show a reasonable approximation of the behavior of each CCR as the sequence runs through the Visualizer?

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ItsMeBobO wrote:

Would it be possible to place one CCR on two pieces of PVC to create two mini arches from one ribbon versus just one arch? The reason I ask is that I have a fairly small yard and I'm not sure If I have room for two 16' arches. I was thinking about two 8' pieces of PVC. Would the ribbon be flexible enough to bend like this? I'm not sure how the pre-set effects would work in this configuration, but I thought I would ask just the same.


I too would like to have smaller arches. Can the cable be cut and extended with four lead wire and resealed? I hear "Void warranty" coming!


Anyone else wondering why 50 was selected instead or 32(96) or 64(192) pixels?


Do two ribbons chasing end to end look like a continuous effect?

Well... it was offered (by Dan I think, no... I'm wrong. It is a note in the manual) that there is a 'cut' line between the individual RGB modules that make up the ribbon where you can split the ribbon, but at the sacrifice of the warranty on the ribbon.

It has also been mentioned that there is the capability for 'daisy-chaining' ribbons, but this is not being offered at present as LOR has not found a water tight connector that they are comfortable with yet.

So... I'd like to offer a thought for consideration by the LOR crew... Since there is obviously a seal on the one end where the ribbon connects to the controller, might LOR consider offering a option to get the ribbon configured in two eight foot sections hard linked (wired) between the two segments using the same seal that is being used for the controller cable?

I also think this would be brilliant for arches, but as others have observed the arches are visually better in multiples.

...and as much as I might like to, I know my budget is not going to allow for more than one of these this season. :)

Which then also brings the thought, is there a macro mode that would allow one to program the two segments as independant units? (for non-synchronous effects, etc.) or would you have to take direct control of the pixels?

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John Hertig wrote:

To make sure I am understanding you, when the CCR ships, there will be by that time a version of the Software available for download which will allow specifying color with 1 channel (meaning complete control of the CCR with a max of 57 channels) and all 57 channels with the same controller ID, correct?

Will it include the ability to add CCR(s) to the Visualizer display without too much tedium, and show a reasonable approximation of the behavior of each CCR as the sequence runs through the Visualizer?

Yes on 57 channels and yes on one unit ID.

We are working on the visualizer, but this is tough. The ribbon's actual shape could be almost anything, an arch, wrapped on a tree like garland, used to wall wash, outline an arbitrary shape, ... It's also likely that macro/color effects will lead the PC software.

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jwilling wrote:

Which then also brings the thought, is there a macro mode that would allow one to program the two segments as independant units? (for non-synchronous effects, etc.) or would you have to take direct control of the pixels?


This is what I would like to do. I plan on buying 2 CCR's and making 4 8-foot arches. I'm not worried about cutting them as I'll have two sets of two arches and each set will be right next to each other (two 8 foot pvc pipes in two arches next to each other and 1 16 foot CCR over both arches).

It would be nice to operate the one CCR as two virtual arches. If that is not possible, I know I can take direct control but I'm afraid of what that will entail.

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JeffBlan wrote:

... I plan on buying 2 CCR's and making 4 8-foot arches. I'm not worried about cutting them as I'll have two sets of two arches and each set will be right next to each other (two 8 foot pvc pipes in two arches next to each other and 1 16 foot CCR over both arches)....

It would be nice to operate the one CCR as two virtual arches. If that is not possible, I know I can take direct control but I'm afraid of what that will entail.

I agree. This is what I plan on doing also. I am going to have 2 CCR's to make 4 Arches and the arches will butt right up against each other at the mid point.

It would be nice to get an option with the two already split with a more flexible cable in the middle so there's less twisting and bending and offers the ability to give 4-12 inches in length between them.

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JeffBlan wrote:


This is what I would like to do. I plan on buying 2 CCR's and making 4 8-foot arches. I'm not worried about cutting them as I'll have two sets of two arches and each set will be right next to each other (two 8 foot pvc pipes in two arches next to each other and 1 16 foot CCR over both arches).

It would be nice to operate the one CCR as two virtual arches. If that is not possible, I know I can take direct control but I'm afraid of what that will entail.

I had thought of doing this as well, only using 1 CCR to make 2 8-foot arches. However I'm just not sure how well you'll be able to bend the ribbon at the midway point.

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I think my explanation may be difficult to understand, but I'll try to explain how I'm going to make 2 - 8' arches out of one with a twist.

On the face of my arches I'm going to attach the strip facing forward and adhere to the 3 foot flex ability on the plane. In the middle where the two arches will meet, I plan on slightly rotating the strip, as it reaches the end, so that I can make the 3 inch bend from one arch to another.

I guess probably the best way to think about it is like this. Take a bow made out of a ribbon as an example. A bow exhibits the same properties as the CCR will have. Flexible one way but not very flexible the other (on the plane). So if you slightly rotate it as you make the bend you can get it to flow from one angle to another with little to no stress.

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Howard,

I'd be interested in seeing your arches once you get them assembled. I'm pretty sure I understand how you would get the ribbon from one arch to the other, but I'd like to see your application completed if possible.

Garrison

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Once delivered and setup I'll be happy to post pics.

Maybe I can find something around home that I can use as a mock up.

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I have not seen this question asked, if I missed it I am sorry...

The macros seem to be the real power here. Will a user be able to define their own macros? If so this is great news...

I ordered mine the first hour of the sale... When do you think CCR will be ready to start shipping?? I am speaking in general terms here not just my order... Speaking in broad terms... Like for example.. "We expect shipments to begin in August."

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