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Extension Cord Routing ideas

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15 minutes ago, caniac said:

fiber isn't that much different than ethernet only 1000 times faster so what you are doing now would work, not sure how it would deal with RS-485 though.

That's why I don't think it would work for me.   I'd have to start changing things around a bit too much to even try using it.  I'll stick with my extension cords, may be a pain at times, but life goes on. :lol:;)

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1 minute ago, Orville said:

That's why I don't think it would work for me.   I'd have to start changing things around a bit too much to even try using it.  I'll stick with my extension cords, may be a pain at times, but life goes on. :lol:;)

fiber doesn't replace extension cords, it replaces ethernet.  Primarily used when you want to push ethernet (and back in the day token ring) greater distances.

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3 hours ago, caniac said:

fiber doesn't replace extension cords, it replaces ethernet.  Primarily used when you want to push ethernet (and back in the day token ring) greater distances.

Shows you just how much I know about fiber optic cables!???  

Seriously though, the only thing I know about fiber optics is the little fiber optic lamps and Christmas Trees that use them, and have used those light fiber optics in a locomotive on occasion to filter light from a source to where an actual light bulb or even L.E.D. would be impractical.  but as for running ethernet, I'd be completely in the dark {no pun intended} using them in that manner.

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8 minutes ago, Orville said:

Shows you just how much I know about fiber optic cables!???  

Seriously though, the only thing I know about fiber optics is the little fiber optic lamps and Christmas Trees that use them, and have used those light fiber optics in a locomotive on occasion to filter light from a source to where an actual light bulb or even L.E.D. would be impractical.  but as for running ethernet, I'd be completely in the dark {no pun intended} using them in that manner.

because the push light instead of electricity it can be pushed farther with less resistance.  Also you can bundle thousands of strands of fiber optic cable together and you don't get the interference you would get with copper.

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13 minutes ago, caniac said:

because the push light instead of electricity it can be pushed farther with less resistance.  Also you can bundle thousands of strands of fiber optic cable together and you don't get the interference you would get with copper.

I know it pushes light, but how do you use it in place of cat5 cables?  And does it replace the cat5 from controller to controller too?  Kind of curious as to how this actually works.

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4 minutes ago, Orville said:

I know it pushes light, but how do you use it in place of cat5 cables?  And does it replace the cat5 from controller to controller too?  Kind of curious as to how this actually works.

just a matter of formatting the data BUT controllers would have to be reworked to allow fiber in and out (sort like most audio amps these days and dvd players).  The signal is the signal whether it is riding on copper or fiber (microchips convert it for either medium).

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Posted (edited)

A lot of routers and switches these days either have optical interfaces built in or far more commonly SFP ports.  SFP is short for Small Form-factor Pluggable.  See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_form-factor_pluggable_transceiver  for details.  Essentially it provides an optical interface rather than an electrical interface for the ethernet.  Depending on the type of FO cable and the transceivers used, it can  go many miles at speeds as much as many tens of gigabits.

I will be using a pair of optical SFPs between two of my switches.

 

Edited by k6ccc

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8 hours ago, Orville said:

Looks more like 96 pairs to me Jim.   I see 6 across and 4 down, 24 for each section by 4 sections = 96 fiber optic cables.

96 strands of glass = 48 pairs of glass.  Each yellow tube is one strand of glass - they are made up in pairs, and it appears that the blue connectors are pairs.

Note that bi-directional fiber optic communications can be done with two strands of glass (one for each direction), or with a single strand of glass (using different wavelengths of light for each direction).  You can also multiplex multiple ethernet circuits onto a single strand with what's called Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) where there are a bunch of different colors of light for each direction.  We have some stuff at work that is capable of 40 colors - each running 10Gb/s (we're not running that much however).  Anyone need 400 Gb/s over a long distance?

 

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I have glass between 2 switches at one of my clients.  For no other reason than to be able to say I have glass between switches.

#geekcred

:P

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11 minutes ago, DevMike said:

I have glass between 2 switches at one of my clients.  For no other reason than to be able to say I have glass between switches.

That is exactly why I am going to run my second link between the family room switch and the data cabinet switch in fiber!  It will also be 100% diverse routed, and the two routes will be a LACP trunk group.

Besides, the optical SFPs are less expensive than gigabit electrical SFPs - enough cheaper that it paid for the 25m two strand multi-mode jumper (conduit extra).

Yes - GEEK!

 

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2 hours ago, k6ccc said:

96 strands of glass = 48 pairs of glass.  Each yellow tube is one strand of glass - they are made up in pairs, and it appears that the blue connectors are pairs.

Note that bi-directional fiber optic communications can be done with two strands of glass (one for each direction), or with a single strand of glass (using different wavelengths of light for each direction).  You can also multiplex multiple ethernet circuits onto a single strand with what's called Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) where there are a bunch of different colors of light for each direction.  We have some stuff at work that is capable of 40 colors - each running 10Gb/s (we're not running that much however).  Anyone need 400 Gb/s over a long distance?

 

Not knowing much about how FO works, that makes sense.  Thanks for clearing that up.  I would have sworn it was 96, didn't realize they were "paired".

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I reroute most of my show each year, mostly because I add a controller here or some more lights there etc. So I have several 8 ch and 16 ch "snakes" (think of the audio snake) that are labeled, zip tied, and ready for use. This way I can run 16 or 8 channels from the controller in one run, not 16 or 8 respectively. I also have a couple that spool out, where the controller (male) ends are all the same length, but the female ends are spread out every 5 feet or so. I mainly use these for the pumpkins during Halloween. Since each one is on a separate channel it works out well.

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I don't bother..... The wife has learned that if she goes and lays out all the extension cords for me, then her Christmas present is bigger, better, and more expensive ! ?

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2 hours ago, Richard Hamilton said:

I don't bother..... The wife has learned that if she goes and lays out all the extension cords for me, then her Christmas present is bigger, better, and more expensive ! ?

Happy Wife, Happy Life!

 

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