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I recently got LOR the DIY (YES!!) and was wondering what the green wires were for. Either they can be just cut off, or I am missing somthing extremly important! THANKS IN ADVANCE!

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jpcrew109 wrote:

I recently got LOR the DIY (YES!!) and was wondering what the green wires were for. Either they can be just cut off, or I am missing somthing extremly important! THANKS IN ADVANCE!

Eh? I don't even see the DIY for sale yet.

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ok ok maybe not the DIY, but the hobbist board

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jpcrew109 wrote:

ok ok maybe not the DIY, but the hobbist board


That makes more sense...

However, I have no idea what green wires you are talking about. Can't recall any green wires sticking out of my boards when I ordered them.

It's either time to post a picture, or wait for Dan to respond.

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Ok im a bad explainer.. I am attempting to talk about the wires that come out of the "pigtails". There is black, white and green.. heres a pic of them

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Those would be the grounding wires.

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jpcrew109 wrote:

Ok im a bad explainer.. I am attempting to talk about the wires that come out of the "pigtails". There is black, white and green.. heres a pic of them

Okay ... now we're getting somewhere!

Since we are talking about electricity, I'm not going to comment. Why? Well, I'm fairly sure I know what I am talking about. However, I'd like for someone else to serve up the answer. This late at night, I tend to mix things up in my head.

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ok but what do I do with them.. do I hook them up to the LOR board or...

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jpcrew109 wrote:

ok but what do I do with them.. do I hook them up to the LOR board or...

This much I know ... DON'T! You want to attach them to something else.

Just what/where and how, I will leave up to others.

Now, I will say, on my setup, I removed the grounding wires. My house did not burn up. Therefore, we can conclude that this was safe, or I got lucky. PLEASE DO YOUR HOMEWORK. Don't assume that my way is correct.

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umm, if you have a metal box I would ground them to the side of the box along with the controler. If its a plastic box, I would hook them all together along with the controler.

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There's a good picture in the user's guide showing them grounded to the case.

Charlie

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JR V wrote:

umm, if you have a metal box I would ground them to the side of the box along with the controler. If its a plastic box, I would hook them all together along with the controler.

JR is pretty much right. The green wires are for ground. Connect them to the surface of a metal housing. If using a plastic housing, don't worry about it and just bundle them together for future use. Plastic can't be used for a ground. If using a metal box, make sure the ground wire from the house power is connected to the housing.

OK, I just stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night so you might want to get with a certified electrician to be safe :].

Seriously, if you have doubt, get an electrician. Electricity can kill!!!

Tom

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Santas Helper wrote:


JR is pretty much right. The green wires are for ground. Connect them to the surface of a metal housing. If using a plastic housing, don't worry about it and just bundle them together for future use. Plastic can't be used for a ground. If using a metal box, make sure the ground wire from the house power is connected to the housing.

I believe if your using 2 power suplies you only need one of them grounded thou. Hopefully someone will concure with this.

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I believe if it is a plastic enclosure and it is being mounted to lets say a metal pole or anything else metal then it will be ok.

Zac

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jpcrew109 wrote:

Ok im a bad explainer.. I am attempting to talk about the wires that come out of the "pigtails". There is black, white and green.. heres a pic of them

I didn't know the hobbyist controllers came with pigtails. Silly me made some up ahead of time.

Also, I plan to drive a copper stake in the garden near my aluminum box's temporary Christmas location with a heavy ga. wire run inside. This is for the earth ground and where the green wire goes. However, your normal string of lights is a 2 prong and the ground isn't there.

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Zac_Cutt wrote:

I believe if it is a plastic enclosure and it is being mounted to lets say a metal pole or anything else metal then it will be ok.

Zac

Then the ground wires from the box will need to be connected to the pole to get a ground. Plastic won't bond to ground.

This is only if you are running 3 wire. Most christmas lights have only 2 wires. A positive and negative. Then a ground isn't needed for those strands.

Again, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express :]. Seek the assistance before a mishap occurs if your not sure.

Tom

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Roadrat wrote:

I didn't know the hobbyist controllers came with pigtails. Silly me made some up ahead of time.

They don't. You have to order them seperate from the controller. Continue to make up your cords.

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Santas Helper wrote:

This is only if you are running 3 wire. Most christmas lights have only 2 wires. A positive and negative. Then a ground isn't needed for those strands.

I believe the correct term should be HOT and NEUTRAL when referring to AC circuits. Positive and Negative refer to a DC circuit.

I'm not sure where a mix up in terminolgy could lead, but I would not want to see an accident occur by using a DC device on AC or vice versa.

======

Roadrat, without knowing your electrical setup, I hesitate to even open this potential can of worms, but make sure if you drive a copper rod for earth ground that you only tie ground(s) to it.

Do not tie (bond) neutral back to it as you will lift the path and change the potential of the current flow in relation to the bonded ground at the main breaker panel. This may seem a silly reply, but the question has come up several times in the old forum.

-- Bob

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Seems right so far,

except I think the point of the feed (cord powering up the controllers) to the controllers may have a ground in it as well which should be attached to the ground. This is the preferred method in most states and provinces. (but talk to the city official electrical supplier)

A pole or steel rod in the ground is generally acceptable if you can't get it (ground) by the power supply cord.

in a metal case, scrape a little of the paint off and grounds can be connected together there. In a plastic case as well as metal. You can buy or pick up grounding bus for real cheap. Looks like a piece of metal with a bunch of screws on it.

the idea of the ground is to bring all electrical equipment, chassis, and devices and non electrical devices, your house, and anything else attached that may come in contact with your electrical system (albeit the hot and neutrals to the same potential ( we are hoping for 0 volts).

When I first moved into my house they had crossed some wires up, and the whole outside was hot. But only when you got between it and the ground. It was amazing that no one got hurt . If it was installed correctly there would have been a ground wire attached to it somewhere, I don't know how long it had been the way I thought it was a requirement for metal siding.

when you are using GFIs (Ground fault interrupters), that ground becomes a very extremely, highly, critically, important (notice the fixation) part of the safety factor.

typical Disclaimer inserted here,

BOB
I bet it has comes up many a time and can get very deep.

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Here you go. Apicture is worth a thousand words.


Attached files 38229=2199-LOR16.jpg

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Thanks Robin. What is connecting the green wires? Where do they go to?

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Ok when you mount your board you will either use a bolt or a screw to secure the board to your box. Connect your ground there. I use a wire nut to wire all of the ground wires together.

However, if you do not need that heavy of a cord for each channel. Just on your cords going to your power supply. We just got a good deal on those cords last year and many of us bought them.

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Robin elected to use pigtails with a gound. It appears he has bound them all together and tied them to the heat sink. This would be the same point that the ground line from the power would be tied to.

Take an extension cord and cut off the female end and strip back the wires. You should have something like a black, white and green wire. Bring these into your box and secure them with some type of strain relief. (Its your call to use one or two power cords). Connect the black wire to the HOT terminal on your LOR board and the white wire to the NEUTRAL connector on your LOR board. The green wire you can put a spade lug or a ring lug on and attach it to the heat sink.

If you chose to use extension cords with grounds for your channel connections, you can tie all the grounds together with a wire nut. They make a really neat one ( I think Robin is using them) that have a single pigtail coming from the wire nut.

I used two wire extension cords for my LOR box (channel connections) so there wasnt a gound to have to mess with. Unless you plan on running grounded equipement from your LOR controller, you really dont need the expense or headache of the three wire pigtails (extension cords). Your lights are only two wire anyway, but that is entirely your call.

Hope this helps.

-- Bob

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ok thanks thats what i was leaning towards anyways

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