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Convert 16 CCR Sequence to Pixel Tree with less nodes?

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Is it possible to convert a sequence designed for a 16 CCR tree into something that can be used on a 16 strip pixel tree that doesn't have 150 pixels per strip? I really wanted to see if there were any LOR features to accomplish this before taking the manual approach.

Thanks!

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4 minutes ago, robigd said:

Is it possible to convert a sequence designed for a 16 CCR tree into something that can be used on a 16 strip pixel tree that doesn't have 150 pixels per strip? I really wanted to see if there were any LOR features to accomplish this before taking the manual approach.

Thanks!

Are you getting 150 pixels confused with 150 leds? Most 16 CCR trees only have 50 pixels per leg which would be 150 leds or 150 channels.

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Just now, Mr. P said:

Are you getting 150 pixels confused with 150 leds? Most 16 CCR trees only have 50 pixels per leg which would be 150 leds or 150 channels.

Wow, I guess I am completely confused then. I just assumed I would have to have a pixel for every "LED"  in order for the sequence to look like it does. Is this not the case?

 

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5 minutes ago, robigd said:

Wow, I guess I am completely confused then. I just assumed I would have to have a pixel for every "LED"  in order for the sequence to look like it does. Is this not the case?

 

 Strips have three leds wired together to make one pixel. There are 30 leds per meter so 10pixels per meter. In a 5m strip that would be 50 pixels. There are also 60 leds per meter which would be 20 pixels or 100 per 5m strip. However, the 30 leds or 10 pixels per meter is the most common used in a CCR tree.

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9 minutes ago, robigd said:

Wow, I guess I am completely confused then. I just assumed I would have to have a pixel for every "LED"  in order for the sequence to look like it does. Is this not the case?

 

No dif in copy paste from pixel strings or ccr ribbons/ strips. Copy and paste to your hearts content.

Now if they have less pixels than the 50 you may run into a problem that I recently experienced with a shared sequence. Shared seq was a 42 pixel per strand. Mine 50. Shared sequence had texts in it. When I copy pasted the words were garbled up. The controller was trying to process the 42 pixel words over the entire 50, think of it as if you had a bag with writing on it and you pull the bag, stretching distorts the writing.

Lucky for me the producer of the sequence was kind enough to take time just 2 days before Christmas to help me resolve the issue.

JR

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4 hours ago, robigd said:

Wow, I guess I am completely confused then. I just assumed I would have to have a pixel for every "LED"  in order for the sequence to look like it does. Is this not the case?

 

The strips that we use for lighting come in (for the most part) either 5 volts or 12 volt version.  As a general rule of thumb, on 5 volt strips, each pixel is individually addressed; whereas on 12 volt strips, generally there are three LEDs that operate together.  Here are a couple examples.    This first photo is 5 volt pixels in part of my pixel star.  Each RGB is individually addressable.  On these strips, there is a chip built into the LED array.

Star_center_fill_top.sm.jpg

In this second photo, the strip is 12 volt.  On these strips, there is one chip (the black square) for every three RGB LEDs (the white squares).  I have annotated the photo with the chips, LEDs and cutting point.

Planter_strip_backfeed.jpg

The reason for this difference is the voltage drop of an LED.  The actual LEDs have a voltage drop of between 1.5 volts to almost 4 volts depending on the color of the LED and how much current you pass through it.  On 12 volt strips, normally there are three LEDs in series to better make use of available 12 volts.  For 5 volt strips, there is not enough voltage to have LEDs in series.

Original LOR CCRs are 12 volt strips and have three RGB LEDs for every chip, for a total of 150 RGB LEDs, but from a functional standpoint, there are treated as 50 pixels.

 

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18 hours ago, k6ccc said:

The strips that we use for lighting come in (for the most part) either 5 volts or 12 volt version.  As a general rule of thumb, on 5 volt strips, each pixel is individually addressed; whereas on 12 volt strips, generally there are three LEDs that operate together.  Here are a couple examples.    This first photo is 5 volt pixels in part of my pixel star.  Each RGB is individually addressable.  On these strips, there is a chip built into the LED array.

Star_center_fill_top.sm.jpg

In this second photo, the strip is 12 volt.  On these strips, there is one chip (the black square) for every three RGB LEDs (the white squares).  I have annotated the photo with the chips, LEDs and cutting point.

Planter_strip_backfeed.jpg

The reason for this difference is the voltage drop of an LED.  The actual LEDs have a voltage drop of between 1.5 volts to almost 4 volts depending on the color of the LED and how much current you pass through it.  On 12 volt strips, normally there are three LEDs in series to better make use of available 12 volts.  For 5 volt strips, there is not enough voltage to have LEDs in series.

Original LOR CCRs are 12 volt strips and have three RGB LEDs for every chip, for a total of 150 RGB LEDs, but from a functional standpoint, there are treated as 50 pixels.

 

Thank you so much for the clear, detailed explanation! I really appreciate you taking the time with the the image annotations. A picture is worth 1000 words!

Thanks again!

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