Jump to content
Light-O-Rama Forums
brichi

Connecting P10 LED panels to LOR?

Recommended Posts

11 minutes ago, caniac said:

what is the colorlight card?

ColorLight is a "receiver" card.  It gets mated with a "sender" card.  The sender takes DVI video in and puts it into raw Ethernet packets.  The Receiver card receives the raw Ethernet packets and drives a P10 matrix.  Go to:  https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-diy-led-video-wall/overview  to learn about as much as I know about it.  That is not the same card that was being used in the video, but it's enough to learn what the heck he's talking about.

With that said, I'm impressed.  If you are running video only, that may well be the way to go.  As I am not planning on video (at least this year), not gonna go that direction.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, k6ccc said:

As for using SuperStar , there may be a way.  I noticed that in FPP you can set universe size to 510 channels.  If that works, you should be able to build a Visualization file and them use SuperStar.  I will attempt that today after I finish pruning my roses.

 

Short answer - it worked.  More in a little bit...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, caniac said:

what is the colorlight card?

It's a card that's only purpose is to drive LED panels which means that it can match exact refresh rates and other parameters to drive the panels with better color depth and scan rates. 

The advantage is you can still use an ethernet cable to run your display but you won't need to build a pi or beaglebone into the back of your display. 

These are also capable of doing more panels as well as different refresh rates sizes and orientation. ( you can also daisy-chain the receiver cards together to make a huge display if you choose)

In the video I had my computer sending E1 31 packets to the Raspberry Pi which then was converting that data to send to the color light receiver card. 

There was some concern with the pie converting the data that there would be a noticeable leg from the panel. 

Edited by Ebuechner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Earlier today, I built a visualization in S4.3.24 of a 32 row by 64 column matrix (2 wide by 2 high P10 panels).  I told Visualizer to pack the rows so there were no unused channels.  Visualizer being unable to split a pixel between universes only uses 510 channels.  Since there were four panels, which would take very slightly over three universes per panel, the visualization took a total of 12 complete and one partial universe.  I then used SuperStar S4.3.24 to build a one minute sequence.  This was then exported to Sequence Editor as an intensity file.

In FPP, I configured a matrix of 2 wide by 2 high P10 panels and I configure 13 universes that were configured as using only 510 channels per universe in E1.31 bridge mode.

I then played the sequence using S4.3.24 Sequence Editor.  It played essentially exactly as I expected.  There were a few places where there were unexpected pixels on the far right or left edge of the panel, but there was very little of that.  As my test last week, the panels were just sitting on the floor and not connected to each other mechanically - and not quite perfectly aligned.  Note, you will see artifacting in the form of mirror image of the actual panel display - That is in the camera and was not on the panel.  That is obvious in several places where I moved the camera and the artifacts move around - including off the panel.  Also note that the video may show as upside down - that is being fixed on the you tube end.  That is a benefit of my piece of crap iPhone.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, k6ccc said:

ColorLight is a "receiver" card.  It gets mated with a "sender" card.  The sender takes DVI video in and puts it into raw Ethernet packets.  The Receiver card receives the raw Ethernet packets and drives a P10 matrix.  Go to:  https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-diy-led-video-wall/overview  to learn about as much as I know about it.  That is not the same card that was being used in the video, but it's enough to learn what the heck he's talking about.

With that said, I'm impressed.  If you are running video only, that may well be the way to go.  As I am not planning on video (at least this year), not gonna go that direction.

 

so mostly for pushing video content a distance from the P10?  you lose effects and everything else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caniac I believe the simplest way to put it as far as I have read up on and awesome info from the guys here as always it the colorlight card is pretty much similar to a Pi Hat or octoscroller BUT its on its own and does a better job being its made for LED panels and you can leave it on its own vs having to have it mounted to the Pi

 

in this case you can have a Pi in you house vs outdoors and then run an ethernet cord from the Pi to the receiver card outside mounted to the display

 

please correct me if im wrong guys but that seems to be the easiest way to explain it, an octoscroller or pi hat that doesn't need to be mounted right to a BBB or Pi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, brichi said:

Caniac I believe the simplest way to put it as far as I have read up on and awesome info from the guys here as always it the colorlight card is pretty much similar to a Pi Hat or octoscroller BUT its on its own and does a better job being its made for LED panels and you can leave it on its own vs having to have it mounted to the Pi

 

in this case you can have a Pi in you house vs outdoors and then run an ethernet cord from the Pi to the receiver card outside mounted to the display

 

please correct me if im wrong guys but that seems to be the easiest way to explain it, an octoscroller or pi hat that doesn't need to be mounted right to a BBB or Pi

You pretty much got it.

These cards are the commercial grade unit that's designed to drive these panels. 

You can keep your Raspberry Pi in the house garage or attic running the display remotely giving you access to the Pi if you need to do any maintenance and the receiver card is built into the display and there is nothing on there that you would need to access physically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, brichi said:

Caniac I believe the simplest way to put it as far as I have read up on and awesome info from the guys here as always it the colorlight card is pretty much similar to a Pi Hat or octoscroller BUT its on its own and does a better job being its made for LED panels and you can leave it on its own vs having to have it mounted to the Pi

 

in this case you can have a Pi in you house vs outdoors and then run an ethernet cord from the Pi to the receiver card outside mounted to the display

 

please correct me if im wrong guys but that seems to be the easiest way to explain it, an octoscroller or pi hat that doesn't need to be mounted right to a BBB or Pi

cost?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just ordered a card for $30, does 256x256 pixels, same as Ebuechner is using

 

I wonder how many colorlights 1 Pi can control, may cut down on that cost too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, brichi said:

I just ordered a card for $30, does 256x256 pixels, same as Ebuechner is using

 

I wonder how many colorlights 1 Pi can control, may cut down on that cost too

Where did you order yours for $30. 

I just ordered a 5A-75B on Amazon for a $38. 

Are you sure you didn't order a 5A-75. 

I'm not sure what the difference is between the 75 and the 75B. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I saw that one with my search but what confuses me is that picture of a 75. 

The 75B has a different Power connector. 

And maybe that's the only difference is the power connector that we're not going to use anyways.( because we use the screw terminals)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Ebuechner said:

I think I saw that one with my search but what confuses me is that picture of a 75. 

The 75B has a different Power connector. 

And maybe that's the only difference is the power connector that we're not going to use anyways.( because we use the screw terminals)

they responded 

 

Thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve you, we confirm that it is 5A-75B, its main characteristic is to have 8 linsn75 ports, and it supports 1/32 scans, we will send it today, if you have any questions, please feel Free to contact us, looking forward to continue to serve you, thank you
Best regards
Vince

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im assuming these P10's are LINS ports like he says below

 

as long as the display board is also linsn75 port, it must be connected to the PC Gigabit Ethernet port, it must use Gigabit network cable, or the PC can not find it. We do not know the structure of your display module, we can not provide specific technical support, we can be sure it supports 1/8 scan P10 display module.If you have any questions, feel free to contact us, thank you
Best regards
Vince
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going to try to decipher what he wrote. 

You will need to make a connection between the color light board and your computer through a gigabeat ethernet connection to use their software for your initial setup. 

You'll need to download LED vision onto your computer to set up the card. 

After that you will need a USB to ethernet adapter connected to the pi to communicate with the card. 

Yesterday I bought a USB 3.0 to gigabit adapter at Best Buy that worked. 

The Amazon basics adapters don't work. 

 

Edited by Ebuechner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15 pages so far of this P10 stuff.........sheesh.  Where's the ignore button?

 

Edited by B.Y.R.G.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, B.Y.R.G. said:

15 pages so far of this P10 stuff.........sheesh.  Where's the ignore button?

 

Lots to learn young Jedi!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, B.Y.R.G. said:

15 pages so far of this P10 stuff.........sheesh.  Where's the ignore button?

 

click unfollow or just don't look at the thread... lots of good info in here for matrix stuff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is it better to get a color light board or just run the matrix with the BBB/octoscroller or Pi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whew, made it through page 10 today.  This project has definitely made my list of things to do and add to my show.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, BMurray said:

So is it better to get a color light board or just run the matrix with the BBB/octoscroller or Pi

I’m going with the Pi with PiHat for my two little ones this year.  But mine will not be any video.  If I build the big one next year, it will likely be the ColorLght board.  If I knew a month ago what I know now, I would have to seriously look at going the ColorLight route.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, B.Y.R.G. said:

15 pages so far of this P10 stuff.........sheesh.  Where's the ignore button?

It's not plug-and-play.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BMurray said:

So is it better to get a color light board or just run the matrix with the BBB/octoscroller or Pi

If you're running under 36 panels go with the pi with an octoscroller.

If you're over that amount use the beaglebone with an octoscroller or a pi running a color light card. 

Here are some pros and cons.

The beaglebone hasn't proven to be as reliable as the pi (in my opinion) and has had some issue driving the panels this really depends on your level of expectation of performance. 

The pi (in my opinion) has proven to be more reliable but there's still a risk of building it into a p 10 panel where you have limited access.

The colorlight card is really new to the scene so opinions are still being formed but it's a commercial grade board that's more capable of handling extreme weather conditions and it's designed specifically to run LED panels of all types but it still relies on a pi to drive it. 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×