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Building Your Control Boxes

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Hello everyone, wow it is great to see so many new LOR users !! And really great to hear that Dan will have some enclosures !! :waycool:I have seen some postings on how everyone will be constructing their LOR controllers so I thought now would be a good time to post some photos and different ways to build them. Especially since the sale will be coming up soon. I truly hope this will help some of you and will be glad to answer any questions. I have two basic ways that I have made mind. One is with pigtails for each channel. And the other way is to build the receptacles onto the control box itself. Since the plastic enclosures has been an issue ( but no more ) I have built a controller box out of scrape wood that has never had any water to penetrate the enclosure. But keep in mind this enclosure will house 2 - CTB-16D,s. Now I know there is probably a hundred ways of building enclosures but these have worked great for me and maybe can work for you. Enjoy !!

Don

Lake Myra Christmas

Wendell, NC

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The following photos here shows the Ritetime box with pigtails and one with receptacles and using the CTB-16D .Remember to brake the tab on each of the receptacles. I used #14 THHN solid wire to wire the receptacles.


Attached files 36098=2078-Controller9.jpg

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The following photos here shows the Ritetime box with pigtails and one with receptacles and using the CTB-16D .Remember to brake the tab on each of the receptacles. I used #14 THHN solid wire to wire the receptacles.


Attached files 36099=2079-Controller8.jpg

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The following photos here shows the Ritetime box with pigtails and one with receptacles and using the CTB-16D .Remember to brake the tab on each of the receptacles. I used #14 THHN solid wire to wire the receptacles.


Attached files 36101=2080-Controller9.jpg

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The following photos here shows the Ritetime box with pigtails and one with receptacles and using the CTB-16D .Remember to brake the tab on each of the receptacles. I used #14 THHN solid wire to wire the receptacles.


Attached files 36102=2081-Controller7.jpg

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Thought I would enclose these photos using the CTB-08 board. Believe it or not , the pvc boxes used ,I found about 15 in a trash dumpster. I purchased these boards when heat sinks was not available to us , so we had to make some ourselves. I really like these boards.


Attached files 36103=2082-Controller4.jpg

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Thought I would enclose these photos using the CTB-08 board. Believe it or not , the pvc boxes used ,I found about 15 in a trash dumpster. I purchased these boards when heat sinks was not available to us , so we had to make some ourselves. I really like these boards.


Attached files 36105=2083-Controller5.jpg

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Thought I would enclose these photos using the CTB-08 board. Believe it or not , the pvc boxes used ,I found about 15 in a trash dumpster. I purchased these boards when heat sinks was not available to us , so we had to make some ourselves. I really like these boards.


Attached files 36106=2084-Controller6.jpg

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Now this is the box built from scrape wood and will be housing 2 -- CTB-16D boards. I will be using pigtails on this one but I am in the process of building one with the receptacles. The inside measurements are 11 inches wide by 17 ½ inches tall. It has 3 coats of polyurethane and 2 coats black outdoor paint. The box was sat outdoors in a rain storm with paper tissue inside and when inspected the tissue was bone dry !


Attached files 36108=2085-Controller11.jpg

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Now this is the box built from scrape wood and will be housing 2 -- CTB-16D boards. I will be using pigtails on this one but I am in the process of building one with the receptacles. The inside measurements are 11 inches wide by 17 ½ inches tall. It has 3 coats of polyurethane and 2 coats black outdoor paint. The box was sat outdoors in a rain storm with paper tissue inside and when inspected the tissue was bone dry !


Attached files 36109=2086-Controller10.jpg

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Now this is the box built from scrape wood and will be housing 2 -- CTB-16D boards. I will be using pigtails on this one but I am in the process of building one with the receptacles. The inside measurements are 11 inches wide by 17 ½ inches tall. It has 3 coats of polyurethane and 2 coats black outdoor paint. The box was sat outdoors in a rain storm with paper tissue inside and when inspected the tissue was bone dry !


Attached files 36110=2087-Housing2.jpg

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Don, Very nice and neat installations!

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Looks nice. Reminds me of some of the early controller boxes I built when I started with this hobby.

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LightORama wrote:

Looks nice. Reminds me of some of the early controller boxes I built when I started with this hobby.

Yes but Don had the advantage of a saw, nails and glue. Dan you only had----Oh look I found this about you:

An assemblage of 1.5-million-year-old stone hand axes unearthed in Tanzania at site west of Lake Natron. The axes, worn from heavy use, bear traces of acacia wood on their blades, the world's earliest evidence for woodworking. "Until now," says Dominguez-Rodrigo, "it was believed that our ancestors' toolkit was limited to simple hand-held stone tools until about 500,000 years ago, when wooden tools and weapons appear to have come into use. The oldest-known wooden implements, from 400,000 years ago, are a set of spruce spears, found near Hannover, Germany, and a yew lance tip from Clacton-on-Sea, England; a 500,000-year-old fossilized rhinoceros shoulder blade with a projectile point wound was found recently at Boxgrove, England, attesting the development of spears by that date. "That our forebears had the ability to fashion wood into utensils a million years earlier than previously thought," adds Dominguez-Rodrigo, "will cause us to reassess our understanding of their ability to hunt and gather." As for what may have been crafted of acacia wood at Peninj remains to be determined; no wooden artifacts were recovered.

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Bill Foley wrote:

LightORama wrote:
Looks nice. Reminds me of some of the early controller boxes I built when I started with this hobby.

Yes but Don had the advantage of a saw, nails and glue. Dan you only had----Oh look I found this about you:

An assemblage of 1.5-million-year-old stone hand axes unearthed in Tanzania at site west of Lake Natron. The axes, worn from heavy use, bear traces of acacia wood on their blades, the world's earliest evidence for woodworking. "Until now," says Dominguez-Rodrigo, "it was believed that our ancestors' toolkit was limited to simple hand-held stone tools until about 500,000 years ago, when wooden tools and weapons appear to have come into use. The oldest-known wooden implements, from 400,000 years ago, are a set of spruce spears, found near Hannover, Germany, and a yew lance tip from Clacton-on-Sea, England; a 500,000-year-old fossilized rhinoceros shoulder blade with a projectile point wound was found recently at Boxgrove, England, attesting the development of spears by that date. "That our forebears had the ability to fashion wood into utensils a million years earlier than previously thought," adds Dominguez-Rodrigo, "will cause us to reassess our understanding of their ability to hunt and gather." As for what may have been crafted of acacia wood at Peninj remains to be determined; no wooden artifacts were recovered.

Hey!!! and I still got the ligts to blink after I built the bulbs! :waycool:

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Hey Bill, That was GREAT !!!! You guys are too much !!

Don

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Don:

On the boxes using Pigtails, what types of wire and female sockets do you use? I've been trying to find either waterproof or water tight Female sockets to no avail. I am considering just cutting up a bunch of those cheap indoor 3' or 6' brown extensions cords.

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I think that is what I am going to do. I stopped by an estate sale the other day and picked up quite a bit of stuff for super cheap. I got a box that must have had 100 extension cords in it, vairous lengths, for $20. I am going to cut a few of them up and use those for my pigtails.

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Hi Michael

I have had a display for 25 years and it is just a fact of life that water will find a way into your sockets. I have tried a lot of methods to prevent this. I do know that tape is not the answer.

I use 6' drop cords with the 3 female plug ends. I just cut off the male ends. Save these to make up control wiring. Each drop cord are rated at 13 amps. I just make it a rule of thumb to never pull any more than 5.5 amps per channel. I only have one scene that pulls that many amps on one channel and that being my Santa Train.

Rain will always be a problem when you are using GFI's and what I have done , I have burn a CD with my voice that the show will have to be shut down due to the weather. We have a crowd every night and the times that I have had to shut it down , everyone understands. This past year we had to shut down twice.

I have just accepted the fact and the plugs will dry out. But I have seen when I had them taped, the water is trap in the plugs, so I just don't tape up the plugs any longer. Hope this help.

Don

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I thought I was the only one thinking of making wooden boxes for my LOR...

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Here's all 96 channels. I still have to mount the terminal strips and fans. Then I can start testing... It will be placed near the front of the house in the basement.

jeff:waycool:



Attached files 37034=2151-Box2.JPG

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Hi Jeff

That really looks nice !!! Wish I had a basement cause this is exactly what I would have done, but you work with what you have. Keep up the great work !!!

Don

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Jeff

That looks great, Looks like you still have abit of work ahead of you, would to see a pic when it's done.

Bill

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Thank You for the kind words. The design kinda took a left turn a couple days ago. I saw someone else's photo of a similar layout here on PC. My design led to bulky bundles of wire that got in the way of the terminals at the ends. So I scrapped it and started over. Much happier now!

jeff


Attached files 39584=2285-Better.JPG

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