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Hi everyone. I'm going to be trying to add an E1.31 network to my laptop for my light display. I have an old router that was sitting in my closet forever. I was wondering if this is a perfectly good router to use, or should I purchase a new one that will likely have faster speeds? Here is a link to the old router I have. (https://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/wifi-routers/wndr3700.aspx)

Thanks so much,

 

Bob

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I use an $8  8 port Ethernet switch from mono price that i ran 3 E1.31 controllers  last year and will be adding another 3 this year. Not sure about a router.  There are many people on this forum that are extremely knowable in this area and will answer this for you.  

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Are you going to remote access or Monitor this network?  This is a (good) WiFi router.

All you need is the Switch portion. for the wired  E1.31 (10/100 ethernet).  to you controllers.

s the 'Show computer going to connect  to this by WiFi? Peer to Peer security mus be set to 'allow'

Do you need another DHCP server? There can only be ONE on a Single Local Area network  (YOU MUST turn it OFF if you just plan to use this on the 'house'  network

(The router can be used to isolate the 'house' network from the 'show' network) if the Modem is set to a simple bridge. )

Unfortunately, some devices get so helpful that  the WAN side must be present to be able to 'configure'

A cheap 8 port switch may be the less stressing solution :D

 

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Thank you BMurray and TheDucks. I wasn't planning to use the Wi-Fi part of the router. Both of your comments made it sound like I don't even need a router to accomplish what I want to do. Are you both just attaching a switch to your computer's Ethernet port? I didn't know I could skip the router all-together. Would I still be able to use uni-cast and set IP addresses and such with just a switch attached?

I wonder why LOR's tutorial suggested a router attached to the computer and not a switch. That would be much easier I would think. (http://www1.lightorama.com/PDF/IntroductionToDMXandE131.pdf)

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for Standalone networks, a Router contains a DHCP server.   That was the point LOR was emphasizing.  Router = simple configuration

You don't need that if you assign unique STATIC IP's (in the same subnet.) to each member.  (192.168.S.x)  S is the subnet of 192.168

 

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You CAN use a surplus WiFi router, but it is overkill.  As has been pointed out, you need to disable the DHCP server and WiFi and only use the switch functionality.  In fact I am using a spare router exactly that way.  I'm going to explain the parts of your typical consumer home WiFi router a bit.

That "simple" home WiFi router actually contains three completely separate functions - although normally it's all on one PC board.  The first part is router that has one WAN port and one LAN port.  The second part is a radio (or more than one) for the WiFi, and the last function is a six port switch.  The router part contains a number of functions that relate to routing between the LAN and WAN ports, and it also contains a DHCP server.  If you don't have anything connected to the WAN port, most of the routing functions don't do anything, but for this purpose, the DHCP server needs to be disabled.  That's normally just a checkbox on the router configuration.  The WiFi radio is just what you think it is.  The six port switch has one port connected to the LAN port of the router, one port connected to the WiFi radio, and the last four ports connected to the LAN jacks on the back of the router.

If you disable the WiFi and the DHCP router, and don't connect anything to the WAN port, you pretty much as left with a switch - which is exactly what you need for this purpose.

 

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