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Chuck in VA

Removing a resistor network

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Well, I was making good progress putting a CTB16KD together last night, when I realized I had just soldered the R2 resistor in with the dot on the left, not right side :wacko: .  Can anyone tell me how to get this back off without damaging anything else?  Thanks!

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Been a couple years since I put a kit together, but I THINK that it doesn't make any difference on the resistor networks.  I think it may even state that somewhere in the instructions.  Of course, I may be confusing this with one of the other many kits I have assembled.  Regarding removal, if you don't have anything to wick up the solder when you reheat it, try using a can of that compressed gas used to clean electronics.  Heat the solder and blow it away carefully with the compressed air.  It will splatter everywhere, so be careful.  Takes a while, but eventually, you can get all the solder off and work the component free.

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You should be okay.  Each pack is actually 4 resistors.  Pin 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 7-8.  If the pack had 9 pins, then you would have take them out and reverse.

 

Invest in a solder sucker (vacuum) (sold-a-pult) when building kits.  Makes removing parts easier. 

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I also use one of them solder suckers. Even when you do a good job of getting 98% of the solder out. There will be a thin film left between the hole and edge of the leads. I then will rock the pack back and forth just a few times. Dont have to move it much to make it work. Might take a small flat blade screwdriver and do the same with the leads on the bottom of the board. Makes pulling the component so much easier to pull loose from the board.

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Resisters are  not directional sensitive, they work the same way no matter which way they are in the circuit

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Resisters are  not directional sensitive, they work the same way no matter which way they are in the circuit

 

Correct on that account, however, there are two types of resistor networks.... one type "A" with each resistor has it's own two pins in the network (I'm sure that R2 is this way).

 

AND THE OTHER TYPE..... "B" where ONE of the pins (generally the one with the dot) is COMMON to ALL the resistors in the nework, this tyoe of unit is generally used as a "pull up" resistor for IC circuits for un-used pins).

(as WBaker has said about the odd number of pins, this is the "tell tale" that it is a type "B" resistor network).

 

 

Greg

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Thanks everyone for the information and advice.  Solder sucker is on the way and we'll see where that and the other suggestions get me !

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Resisters are  not directional sensitive, they work the same way no matter which way they are in the circuit

True, but not all resistor networks are reversible. But as someone else has pointed out. The ones LOR uses are reversible. But there is one resistor network that is a different value. So this one pack needs to be identified and insured that it is placed in the one socket.

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