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Why do you use Pro Series over Res Series?

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Why does one purchase/use the Professional Series controllers (LOR1602W) over the Residential Series controllers (CTB16PC)?

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As mentioned in your other thread there are differences between the two controllers. That said, they can all work together, and create/produce the same effects.

 

Some commercial projects have no choice but to use the 1602 series, due to the UL508 rating. For others it's purely a personal preference.

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Thanks for the quick reply, sir!  That's what I'm looking for.  But, also looking for those "personal preferences", such as...

 

1.  "I need the UL508 rating."

2.  "I like the "swing door" on the Residential vs the screw plate on the Pro Series."

3.  "I like the Unit ID setting on the Pro Series vs the laptop-requirement of the Res Series."

4.  "etc".

 

Just looking for those insights that aren't necessarily gleaned from a spec sheet.

 

So, why do YOU purchase/use one over the other?

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Commercial projects I use 1602.

 

For home it's a combination of CTB16D cards (circa 2005) and PC boards. Why? When I got started the PC boards weren't available yet. Since they came out, I've only added PC (residential) boards/controllers to the display.

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Thanks for the quick reply, sir!  That's what I'm looking for.  But, also looking for those "personal preferences", such as...

 

1.  "I need the UL508 rating."

2.  "I like the "swing door" on the Residential vs the screw plate on the Pro Series."

3.  "I like the Unit ID setting on the Pro Series vs the laptop-requirement of the Res Series."

4.  "etc".

 

Just looking for those insights that aren't necessarily gleaned from a spec sheet.

 

So, why do YOU purchase/use one over the other?

Res. It's cheaper!! :)

Edited by 75redman

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Since you are on the topic, I saw this on the comparison sheet.

 

Use in 3 phase electrical environments CheckmarkGreen.gif

     no

 

I am not sure what this means.  I use my PC controllers in a 3ph environment every year.   Under what circumstances will they not work from a 3ph panel of the correct voltage? 

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plasmadrive, on 04 Apr 2014 - 4:40 PM, said:

Since you are on the topic, I saw this on the comparison sheet.

 

Use in 3 phase electrical environments CheckmarkGreen.gif

     no

 

I am not sure what this means.  I use my PC controllers in a 3ph environment every year.   Under what circumstances will they not work from a 3ph panel of the correct voltage? 

 

I think the commercial controllers pickup zero-crossing for their timing from each leg individually.

 

There was talk of the residential controllers picking phase timing from only one leg.

 

Max-Paul might know for sure. :rolleyes:

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I think it's good to have at least one pro box in your collection because of the stand alone mode.  Ive used a box several times other than at Christmas by loading a sequence into it for a small project.

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I think the commercial controllers pickup zero-crossing for their timing from each leg individually.

 

There was talk of the residential controllers picking phase timing from only one leg.

 

 

 

Well, they all have to pick up zero crossing to work so not sure that is the case. 

 

None of the LOR controllers that I know if will draw from all three legs of the 3ph power, so don't think that is it. 

 

I am really curious why LOR lists that as a feature..  

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Unless it changed with gen 3 hardware, only the DIO32 product supports multiple zero crossing detection. Both the 1602 and PC controllers presume both inputs (when configured) are in phase, or 180 out.

As long as both inlets are on the same leg of a 3 phase service, they work fine. If one inlet is plus 120 degrees, or minus 120 degrees, channels 1-8 will have major dimming curve issues.

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Unless it changed with gen 3 hardware, only the DIO32 product supports multiple zero crossing detection. Both the 1602 and PC controllers presume both inputs (when configured) are in phase, or 180 out.

As long as both inlets are on the same leg of a 3 phase service, they work fine. If one inlet is plus 120 degrees, or minus 120 degrees, channels 1-8 will have major dimming curve issues.

 

I used one controller on my 3ph power, split between two different phases with a common neutral and had no problem.  (It was a trick question from me)  :P

 

Of course the answer is.... the shop power at my house is the old 240v 3ph with a stinger leg.. which means it is a Delta with a center tapped winding...  which is why it worked.  (The two phases are180 deg out of phase). (JUST DON'T USE THE STINGER LEG)

 

Since they only have a single zero crossing detect they won't support use on a Wye configuration which is the more common 208/120vac 3ph 4wire.  (All phases are 120 deg out of phase with each other).

 

 

Ok.. I was being a butt!  :D   Wanted to see what kind of answers I would get..  B)

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Delta is not that common in new construction. But note that you are only using 1 leg of the delta. And your two inlets are going to be 0 or 180 degrees as long as you are using the same leg that your ground bonded center tap is in.

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Delta is not that common in new construction. But note that you are only using 1 leg of the delta. And your two inlets are going to be 0 or 180 degrees as long as you are using the same leg that your ground bonded center tap is in.

True, 240v Delta is not common at all in new construction, out here anyway.. 

 

I am actually using 2 legs of the delta not 1 (since there are only three legs to use).  I think you meant I am using one winding of the delta, yes? 

 

That is why it works for me and my setup.  I lucked out when I got a delta instead of a wye on my 3ph power.  Of course I have less 120v power that I can use, but since it is a 200 panel, it is plenty for my 120v needs..

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It would seem to me that from a 3 phase perspective, your legs are A-B, B-C and C-A. It is somewhat arbitrary which one of these has the center tap and tie to neutral/ground, though there probably is a standard convention from a labeling perspective.

But if A-B is the one center tapped, you are using A-n-B for your lighting. You are not using B-C or C-A. You are basically using just a single 240v split phase which is basically residential power. Your pannel has the ability to wire single phase 240 loads on those two legs, but it generally is only used for 3 phase loads. B-C can correctly power 240v loads, as can C-A, but C-n is not really a valid combination to draw power on.

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It would seem to me that from a 3 phase perspective, your legs are A-B, B-C and C-A. It is somewhat arbitrary which one of these has the center tap and tie to neutral/ground, though there probably is a standard convention from a labeling perspective.

But if A-B is the one center tapped, you are using A-n-B for your lighting. You are not using B-C or C-A. You are basically using just a single 240v split phase which is basically residential power. Your pannel has the ability to wire single phase 240 loads on those two legs, but it generally is only used for 3 phase loads. B-C can correctly power 240v loads, as can C-A, but C-n is not really a valid combination to draw power on.

It is never arbitrary.. it is ALWAYS the one you don't want it to be.. Murphy's Law  :P

 

Mine happens to be AnB actually.  You are correct, those two phase connections to N are very similar to a plain residential power panel.  I use C for 3ph loads and 240v loads only...

 

BTW, you say "C-n is not really a valid combination to draw power on".... sure it is.  You can use it on 120v gear...  ONCE!  :D   .....And only for a very short time...   Something to do with the "Secret Smoke Causation Rating". (SSCR, not to be confused with SCCR) B)

 

But.... now that you mention it... You could technically use C-n for loads like auto ranging switching supplies that are 120-240v.  I have never though of doing this until just now, but it would work.. Not sure why you would want to.. but you could I guess.. C-n would be about 192v or so..  uuumm... :blink:

 

(You'll know this is tongue in cheek.... right?)

Edited by plasmadrive

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I could be wrong, but True "Delta" is what is on the pole (Never seen 4 wire 3 phase on a pole) you have to remember that any lower voltage 3 phase (800 volts and down)  has gone through a LOCAL transformer (pole or pedstal mount).

 

The local transformer will convert delta to wye (if needed).

 

220px-DeltaWyeTransformer.svg.png

 

 

Motors are automatically Delta (never seen a 4 wire motor yet)

 

I'm talking BEFORE earth or grounding wire.

 

Greg

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Never seen it drawn that way but looks about right. 

 

All motors are not automatically delta..  There are two phase motors... single phase motors, DC motors, wye/delta motors, permanent magnet AC motors, high count special poly phase motors... :P 

 

But I assume you meant all standard 3ph motors.. yes?  :)

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