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Robocrash

Warm white from RGB pixels

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Hi Guys,

 

Even when using the "Superstar cool" keyword in the fixture comments section, I'm not getting what I would call a warm white from my RGB pixels.  I'm using 12mm RGB pixels from Ray Wu.

 

I can see that Green output is reduced to 69%, and Blue is reduced to 60%, but I'm still not happy with the color.  I'd like to match closer to white icans.  

 

Can anyone suggest a better mix of RGB?  Or should I just hammer away by trial and error?

 

Thanks

dave

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I don't know if Ray Wu RGB pixels are naturally warm white or cool white. And it is possible that some batches use LEDs that are warm white and some batches use LEDs that are cool white. The thing to do is to go into the hardware utility and send 100% red, 100% green and 100% blue to the pixels. Look at the LEDs, do they look cool white, or warm white? Cool white has a bluish tint to it, warm white is more of a true white.

The default in SuperStar is to treat the RGB pixels as naturally being "cool white" because this is how CCRs are. To take the blue tint out of the "cool white" SuperStar pulls back the Green and Blue as you are observing.

If the Ray Wu RGB pixels are naturally "warm white" then green and blue should not be reduced. Use the keyword "superstar warm" to tell SuperStar that the RGB pixels are naturally "warm white" and then it will not pull back on the green and blue.

One test is send 100% red, 100% green and 0% blue. Look at the LEDs, are they a true yellow or are they greenish yellow? If they are greenish yellow, pull back the green until you see a true yellow.

Another test is send 100% red, 0% green and 50% blue. Look at the LEDs, are they a true purple or are they a bluish purple? If they are bluish purple, pull back the blue until you see a true purple.

After doing the "Yellow" and "Purple" test, let me know what values you had to send from the Hardware utility to get a true "Yellow" and "Purple."

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Just as an FYI, I used a mix of 100% Red, 70% Green, and 19% Blue to get an incandescent look on some of my post lights for the yard landscaping.  At Christmas, I used some Ray Wu 50mm pixels to light plastic luminaries and used 100% Red, 26% Green and 0% Blue to get a candle look.
 
Xlights Nutcracker software has a great little test utility tab that lets you run individual sliders up and down for the R, G & B chanels seperately in real time so you can play with the mix to get the blend you want.  I put an incandescant lamp and a candle next to my pixels to see them side by side.  That gave me a target to reach.
 
Just a thought.

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SuperStar does not have the ability to play directly to your lights. It only has the ability to export files that the Sequence Editor can play.

With SuperStar the idea is to get the color you want on the computer screen, and then if you have told it if the RGB lights are "cool white" or "warm white" it will do a good job of getting the color on your lights to be the same color that you saw on your computer screen.

With LOR software, the way to control the lights in real time is with the Hardware Utility.

If I understand your question, you want to know what to set in SuperStar to get the "incandescent look" on your RGB lights. You already know that you want 100% red, 70% green and 19% blue for the raw values that are sent. SuperStar does not use "raw values" it takes the color you have on the screen and adjusts what is sent to the RGB lights to get the lights to match the screen. But that makes it difficult for you to know what to set in SuperStar to get it to send raw values of 100% red, 70% green, and 19% blue.

There is a way to get SuperStar to use "raw values", click on the Tools menu and select "configuration". In the configuration dialog box select "Use Raw Values".

Now when you export it will send exactly what you set. So if you set 100% red, 70% green and 19% blue that is what will be sent to your lights.

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Thanks guys - very helpful replies.

 

Brian - These pixels at 100% R, G &B have the "cool" blueish tint.  I experimented with both the "Superstar cool" and "Superstar warm" settings, but didn't get to where I wanted.

 

Pulled out a set of White Incans and set the pixels and incans side by side for some initial testing.

Next step - try the settings suggested by Alien.   and make some of my own adjustments as needed.   I'll post my results back here.

 

dave

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