Jump to content
Light-O-Rama Forums

Recommended Posts

I had 2 controllers which needed a new cat5 port. I had trouble getting all the solder out on both and also had 2 pins break off and were 'stuck' in one of the controllers. After several people tried various ways to desolder and open the holes, we finally got them open by using a heat gun and heating small screwdriver type punch tools. One controller's new port is working and the other is not. The nonworking port is the one that had the pins stuck in it. After soldering the new port in 3 times and it still didn't work I found that 2 of the green board connections (top 2nd and 4th from left, looking at the underside of the board) have been partially stripped. This is definitely not anything I can fix, but I wondered if anyone may know how to do it or if LOR can fix this. The board itself still functions and I'm still going to use it since I do have 1 cat5 and the other smaller port to daisy chain.

 

Any suggestions is greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOR might be able to repair it by bridging a small wire from the circuit trace if that is broken to the connector.  It's not a easy fix if I'm reading your condition correctly.  I used to do this type of repair when working in electronic manufacturing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your reply. I don't think this will be an easy fix either. I had to use this board to finish setting up, it just has to be at the end of the chain. I will contact LOR about it, but it might have to wait until take-down day. I don't really want to have to dive into the rat's nest of wires since I've already done it twice in the last few days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IF LOR can't do the repair (or it's simply not done by them). There IS a trick to re-working  a damaged board.

 

the entire board will have to be out of the box, with all cables removed. (the heatsinks can stay on the board).

 

the dead connector if the traces are on the component side it will be real tough, IF the traces are on the back side it's easier..

 

get some 22 ga. wire (sometimes one can use a strand out of a larger stranded wire (just ONE strand out of that larger wire), about the thickness of a hair or so).

 

An "exacto knife" with a curved blade, carefully scrape the coating away from the bad trace a bit farther back from the solder pad (or behind the break), with the connector or component in place, use a set of tweezers to hold the strand and wrap one end of it on the component, and "lay out" the other end over the fresh copper where you scraped the coating away from that trace (you do NOT want to uncover others, ONLY the one in question) (this is the reason for the curved blade, you can be selective of what you uncover).

 

Tin the trace in question and lay the strand onto it, and solder. confirm operation of said fix. to hold everything in place AFTER you know it works.... use epoxy or hot glue to cover and protect your fix.

 

it's NOT easy, find an old junk radio or scrap board to test your skills on BEFORE you attempt the controller.....

 

use a low wattage iron (Pencil iron) , NOT A GUN.

 

Practice, practice, practice

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If worse comes to worse, one can use a small wire (radio shack 22 ga "hook up" wire) leave the insulation on, find the other end of the bad trace (where does it go to, the other end of that trace, use the insulated wire to make a new trace, expose ONLY the 2 ends of the wire, solder one end to the connector pin in question, the other end to the spot where the trace went to. (you are making an "off board trace") 

 

CONFIRM that it works correctly, epoxy or hot glue your new wire to the board.

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really appreciate your suggestions. I haven't been online much so I didn't see your posts until today. I have not done anything with my controllers yet. One board is being used in the display and the other is awaiting my decision to attempt to repair or to contact LOR. This may become a snow day project. I will have to decide after practicing on something :)

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could also put one of these...

ADAPTER-3WAYFF-2.jpg

...inside the case, connected with a short jumper to the working jack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe they also make one that has a single male that goes to a dual female. Though what Steven's has an advantage of is that it will not add to the chance that the connector on the board will be damaged.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...