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Quad

Elegant permanent CCR attachment to house

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About 6 months or so I asked the community the best way to mount CCRs on houses. Many of the responses I got referenced PVC and J-channel. I was looking for a permanent solution that I wouldn't have to disassemble each year and that would look nice during the day.

Long story short I came upon glazing tape. It is a double sided tape. It is waterproof and comes in black or white; it costs about 12$ for a 100 ft roll. My house is white so I used the white tape. It works great. I have 11 CCRs on my house and not one has come unattached in the last 4 months. They have been through rain, snow, freezing temperatures, heavy winds over 60mph.

One item to note is that it won't stick on abrasive surfaces such as brick. My house having a brick front was an issue for this reason, for some corners of the house. I solved this issue by putting up aluminum flat bar along the brick. This sells for about 5-6$ for a 12 feet section from a metal supply store. I use flat bar that is a little narrower than the CCR so you can't see the aluminum. The glazing tape adheres nicely to the aluminum base.

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Hi Quad,

Were you able to take pictures of your CCR's this weekend? I'm interested in this as well.

Thanks!

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I'm glad to hear someone else is thinking this way.  Kudos on paving the way.

 

I've been very interested in the possibility of this as well, but I am concerned about the weather affects beyond mounting.  I've been wondering if it was practical and whether these ribbons would last if we installed them non-stop between early Oct and early Jan.  You took it to a whole other level.  :)   

 

These aren't inexpensive and a permanent exterior mounting seems to intuitively have a degredation affect on the MTFB/expected life even if mounted away from direct sunlight in perhaps an under-eaves channel. 

 

Q1: Does anyone have a good idea on how long these should last using a normal temporary installation approach?    

Q2:  I've heard & read a number of instances where IP67 items took on water.  Does anyone know if IP68 rated hardware really is sufficient for a long term exterior mounting strategy?

Q3: One other point of concern I have is the possibility of condensation. A completely sealed unit will draw moisture.

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I'm glad to hear someone else is thinking this way.  Kudos on paving the way.

 

I've been very interested in the possibility of this as well, but I am concerned about the weather affects beyond mounting.  I've been wondering if it was practical and whether these ribbons would last if we installed them non-stop between early Oct and early Jan.  You took it to a whole other level.  :)   

 

These aren't inexpensive and a permanent exterior mounting seems to intuitively have a degradation affect on the MTFB/expected life even if mounted away from direct sunlight in perhaps an under-eaves channel. 

 

Q1: Does anyone have a good idea on how long these should last using a normal temporary installation approach?    

Q2:  I've heard & read a number of instances where IP67 items took on water.  Does anyone know if IP68 rated hardware really is sufficient for a long term exterior mounting strategy?

Q3: One other point of concern I have is the possibility of condensation. A completely sealed unit will draw moisture.

This is the second year for my windows. I still haven't taken them down yet and am not concerned about the overall life being shortend.   My upper windows are exposed to the weather, and here in Ohio, we get everything.  Last year, my first using them, I had one section that seemed to wick up the moisture. I should note, the wicking was at my cut joint. After bringing it in the house and resealing the end with silicone, I've had no further issues.   As I have posted other times, I would label these as somewhat fragile and limit any un-needed flexing of the ribbons.  

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We're here in central Indiana so it's nice to hear that you've been successful with very similar weather.  Thanks for sharing your experience.   I think we'll give it a try.  

 

I've been tinkering with an idea to use aluminum L channel and stick the strip in place with double-sided exterior rated tape. reinforced periodically with a small wiretie every so often through holes drilled in the L channel.  The thought being that the L portion could be used as a little top overhang "Roof" and provide rigidity to the strip as well. 

 

I'd drill holes in each end of the L channel and sink a permanent double threaded stud screwed in through the aluminum trim on the house at the peaks lower end of the roof line with only about 3/4" of the threaded stud left exposed.   I'd then simply install the aluminum light channel with a stainless steel washer and nut on the threaded stud through the holes drilled on each end of the L channel allowing for easy removal if maintenance was ever needed.  The aluminum would serve to give it a consistent dust free surface to mount to while on the ground, then I'd only have to run up the ladder once at the peak and once for each end by the gutter downspouts.

 

Still thinking about it.

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About 6 months or so I asked the community the best way to mount CCRs on houses. Many of the responses I got referenced PVC and J-channel. I was looking for a permanent solution that I wouldn't have to disassemble each year and that would look nice during the day.

Long story short I came upon glazing tape. It is a double sided tape. It is waterproof and comes in black or white; it costs about 12$ for a 100 ft roll. My house is white so I used the white tape. It works great. I have 11 CCRs on my house and not one has come unattached in the last 4 months. They have been through rain, snow, freezing temperatures, heavy winds over 60mph.

One item to note is that it won't stick on abrasive surfaces such as brick. My house having a brick front was an issue for this reason, for some corners of the house. I solved this issue by putting up aluminum flat bar along the brick. This sells for about 5-6$ for a 12 feet section from a metal supply store. I use flat bar that is a little narrower than the CCR so you can't see the aluminum. The glazing tape adheres nicely to the aluminum base.

Could you provide a link to the Glazing Tape please.

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I echo Steve's remarks.  Two of my CCRs have been outdoors continuously experiencing the sun and the elements for the past three and a half years, and to date I've noticed absolutely no signs of weathering or moisture accumulation.  If I didn't know which ones they are I wouldn't be able to tell.

 

And I agree, in CAPITAL LETTERS, that anything you can do to minimize flexing the ribbons will definitely prolong their life span.

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http://www.flickr.com/photos/94341905@N03/sets/72157633080187981/

 

Here is the link to the pictures.  Sorry this took so long!

 

Anywhere there is brick, the CCRs are mounted to aluminum flat bar.  The other areas of the house the CCR is directly mounted to the aluminum fascia with the glazing tape. 

 

So far haven't had any of the CCRs come off.  As you can see from the overall picture of the house the CCRs are hard to see especially from the street.

 

 

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The tape is orderd and inbound now.  Thanks for the tip Quad. 

 

 

Q:  I've checked out all the box stores and TSC.  I found some good 6ft aluminum stock at about a buck per foot. 

 

What did you do to join them on end for your two story vertical run, and how did you attach the aluminum stock to the brick?

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The tape is orderd and inbound now.  Thanks for the tip Quad. 

 

 

Q:  I've checked out all the box stores and TSC.  I found some good 6ft aluminum stock at about a buck per foot. 

 

What did you do to join them on end for your two story vertical run, and how did you attach the aluminum stock to the brick?

 

I bought aluminum flat bar from a local metal supply store.  Most cities have them; they usually sell different grades of steel and aluminum.  I got 12 feet strips for $5 each.  Despite the length i did have to join two pieces because the vertical run on my house is about 17 feet.  I just mated them up and screwed them in.  I attached it to the house with blue masonry screws they have at lowes or home depot.  I countersunk the aluminum so that the screws would be flush with the top of the aluminum bar.  I usually put the screws in every 2 feet.  I put the screws into the brick mortar as drilling into the brick isn't easy. 

 

Your 6 feet pieces would work.  I would recommend attaching them on a warm day as the aluminum will expand and contract with the temperature.

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Can you take a picture of the peaks? How did you get it to flex at the peaks? Did you cut and re-attach or flex the ribbon at the top of the peaks? I want to outline but not sure how to go about it without stressing the ribbon. Thanks in advance.

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Great post and idea. I have been thinking for a while on the right solution as my roof is two stories high and I would not want to take on the ladders every season.

One question - can the CRRs be cut into specific lengths or joined. Do you see the costs dropping. Are there suppliers who can provide at cheaper prices. Since the last many

years prices have dropped for all electronics. Why are the CCRs so expensive. thanks

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I've gone a slightly different way with my CCRs.  I use the on various props for various seasons.  (Tiny arches for Easter, A Talking face for halloween, a 3D star for Christmas and Independence day.)

 

Anyway...  I have attached sticky-backed velcro to the strips.  That way I can store them safely when not in use and easily attach them to the props.   Problem is that I can't get the velcro to stay attached.  I used sticky-backed velcro.  I've tried using hot glue and even gorilla glue.  But nothing sticks to the ribbons.  (are they made of teflon?)    :D

 

Does the "glazing tape" stick well to the ribbons?  If so, do you think that this would be a solution to attach the velcro?  Is glazing tape flexible enough to be bent and re-bent?

 

Thoughts?

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I was thinking of taking a pvc pipe and cut it long ways, creating a cradle for the CCR, after this, place the CCR into the 1/2 pvc then sliding all of this into 1" vinyl tubing, creating a sturdy, protected, sleeve for the CCR. This is a work in progress, I am still trying tofigure out how to mount this to the house. :-)

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