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Need help U1 Socket


mendo15

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Okay guys I have a ctb16pc kit that me and my father built (he solders I read instructions lol). We just got done with everything and I was checking it over. And I noticed we soldered the U1 Socket (8 pins) on backwards. Notch is supposed to be on left but we soldered it on with the notch on the right side.

Will this affect anything?

Thanks guys!

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Just make sure you put the chip in properly, the socket itself is not going to affect anything if its backwards.

You sure it's okay? Is the sockets main purpose just to transfer power up to the chip?

Why on the instructions does it say to make sure notch is on the left?

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It will be FINE.

The notch on the socket is just there to show you how to align the chip. Installing it backwards doesn't change anything AS LONG AS you install the chip into the socket the RIGHT WAY (that is OPPOSITE to the way you soldered in the socket).

When I have done this before (and you will do it again), I take a white paint marker and put a DOT on the socket in the correct orientation. That tells me CAUTION SOCKET BACKWARDS, and shows the way the chip SHOULD be installed.

You will do MORE DAMAGE if you try removing the socket and reversing it.

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You sure it's okay? Is the sockets main purpose just to transfer power up to the chip?

Why on the instructions does it say to make sure notch is on the left?

You are correct. The socket is there for convenience, and ease of replacement if needed.

You actually gave a good example of that...if you had soldered the chip direct, backwards, then its a whole different conversation.

For a typical DIP chip, it is symettrical, so the socket can go either way. Other types of chips, you may not be so lucky.

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Not meant to muddy the waters, but just a bit of info. I have seen in rare cases where there has been a decoupling cap built into the socket. And those sockets do have to be installed properly.

DevMike, great tip with the white paint. Even small model paint and a brush can do the same job. Op, just be extra careful and remember to put the chip dot in the other direction than the socket.

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You guys are awesome! Thanks!

Oh and I know this might sound dumb but with the Triacs (Q0-Q15) they do have to be soldered right? Me and my dad got a little confused because of the directions that said stuff about thermal compound if using light duty heat sinks. I am using high power heat sinks so I do not use the compound?

Can someone help me with steps? Please and thank you!

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You guys are awesome! Thanks!

Oh and I know this might sound dumb but with the Triacs (Q0-Q15) they do have to be soldered right? Me and my dad got a little confused because of the directions that said stuff about thermal compound if using light duty heat sinks. I am using high power heat sinks so I do not use the compound?

Can someone help me with steps? Please and thank you!

Yes you solder them to the circuit board and when you are done you use the thermal compound in between the triacs and the heat sinks.

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Yes you solder them to the circuit board and when you are done you use the thermal compound in between the triacs and the heat sinks.

I use compound even though I'm not using low power heat sinks? On the steps it states, "If you are going to use the light duty heat sinks as heat sinks, spread a small amount of thermal compound on the outer surface of the triacs' metal tabs. Otherwise skip this step, because the light duty heat sinks will be used only as soldering guides"

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I use compound even though I'm not using low power heat sinks? On the steps it states, "If you are going to use the light duty heat sinks as heat sinks, spread a small amount of thermal compound on the outer surface of the triacs' metal tabs. Otherwise skip this step, because the light duty heat sinks will be used only as soldering guides"

You are looking at page 19 of the steps. the reason that they say that is if you are using the low power heatsinks it is easier to go ahead and bolt the triacs to them and then solder to the board. If you are using the high power heatsinks you solder them on to the board and continue following the instructions. The reason you cannot put the high power heatsinks on before soldering is they cover most of the back side of the board. look on the very last page of the instruction book and that shows how to properly install the high power heatsinks. The instructions for installing the high power heatsinks are on the last page 22. Good Luck!

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Another note.... make sure you go through all checks on page 21 and power up and test your board BEFORE installing the heat sinks. Once they are installed you cannot access the back side of the board.

Okay so first I would set the triacs on the board making sure they are seated right then solder them.Then follow the steps on page 22? Well test after soldering then steps on page 22?

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First suggestion is to read the manual thru, each step, and make sure you clearly understand, and ask questions, such as you are doing here. Don't solder a thing until you are clear on what you want to do.

Assuming you are going with high power heat sinks (large flat L bracked sinks, as opposed to the punched smaller flat pieces of metal):

1. whether you use high power or lower power, you're going to attach the tabs of the triacs to the heat sinks, with the hardware provided.

2. you will use heat sink compound when mounting the triacs to the heat sink you will use for the controller, in this case, high power heat sinks.

3. the low power heat sink, in this case, is used as a mounting guide, as you want the holes on the triac tabs to line up with high power the heat sink holes when you install that heat sink. So thats the reason for attaching them to the low power heat sink temporarily, and not using compound. (Once you build a few, you may very well skip this step, but for now, definitely do it).

4. the triacs mount with the flat tab facing away from the board (where you'll apply the compound). The pins are bent to make it easy for you to get them oriented. BE VERY CAREFUL you do not mix up the triacs with the regulators. The regulators do not have their pins bent like the triacs. You'll have 16 triacs, two regulators; also identifiable by a close look at the part number.

5. when you mount the high power heat sink, use a small (a lot goes a long way) amount of thermal compound on the flat side tab of the triac, you want just enough to get good heat transfer to the heat sink itself.

6. Again, take your time and read the directions multiple times, lay out the parts in advance before even picking up the soldering iron.

Good luck!

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Gary is giving you great stuff. If you do not use the low power heat sinks as guides. The triacs will not be spaced out properly. Thus when you try to mount them to the high power heat sinks the holes will be way out of alignment. Thus you are going to try to force the holes into proper alignment and might cause stress to either the board or one or two triacs. Stress can lead up to failure of a component. So to avoid stress use the low power heat sink to help align the triacs as you solder them into place.

As for the heat sink grease. When given this for any electronic device. Use it. As Gary mentioned, use it during the final assembly, be it the low power heat sink install or the high power heat sink install. Note that you do not have much and you have 16 of these to grease up. Just a small dab just below the mounting hole will do. This helps promote transfer of heat from the tab to the surface of the heat sink.

P.S. that is the reason that computer CPUs have this stuff between it and the heat sink on the CPU. It fill in any imperfections between the CPU and H.S. and thus increase the conduction surface.

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Absolutely correct.

I have to stress the point about not using too much:

Even 2 perfectly flat pieces of metal will still have microscopic ridges/pits/etc. The grease helps 'fill' the voids so to speak,

But here is the thing, many people think if a little is good, more is better. NOT TRUE in this case. Metal to metal contact is the best way to transfer heat, with metal to grease to metal second. Too much grease, and you'll actually reduce the amount of heat transfered (less metal to metal) - turning the grease from a conductor of heat to an insulator!

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For a quick test, don't worry about the ground (assuming you are talking line cord).

Power it up, first thing to look for (making sure you have both line cords connected, or jumpers installed to use one line cord) is a flashing LED.

From there, you want to test connectivity using the Hardware Utility (I'm assuming you have your USB485B adapter ready, with drivers installed). Verify the HU can find the controller.

Once you have connectivity, then test each channel with a string of lights.

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For a quick test, don't worry about the ground (assuming you are talking line cord).

Power it up, first thing to look for (making sure you have both line cords connected, or jumpers installed to use one line cord) is a flashing LED.

From there, you want to test connectivity using the Hardware Utility (I'm assuming you have your USB485B adapter ready, with drivers installed). Verify the HU can find the controller.

Once you have connectivity, then test each channel with a string of lights.

I am using the 3 wire input cords from LOR. I am confused as to which color goes where. Black goes to hot input, white goes to neutrals, and the green?

Also how would the output wires go on?

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Guest wbottomley

I am using the 3 wire input cords from LOR. I am confused as to which color goes where. Black goes to hot input, white goes to neutrals, and the green?

Also how would the output wires go on?

If you're having trouble figuring out where wires go or what colors mean, I suggest to stop and read the manual carefully or don't take up this hobby.

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